Beavers are amazing critters, and I fondly remember the few up-close encounters I’ve had with nature’s engineers over the years.

Fondly, that is, after the initial shock of the encounter has passed.

Beavers don’t really like sharing space with us humans, you see. And on the few occasions I’ve strayed into their territory, I’ve learned that they can make quite a commotion if they need to.

Tops among those experiences was at Beech Hill Pond, trolling for smallmouth bass along a deserted shoreline on a flat-calm day. With both feet up on the gunwale and my back to shore, I putted along, waiting for a fish to bite.

That didn’t happen.

Instead, I was knocked out of my near-doze by the thunderous clap of a beaver’s tail as it splashed the water just behind me.

Since then, I’ve watched an irate beaver in a standoff with a surly moose in a Canadian pond, with neither willing to yield ground to the other, and have watched a large beaver swim directly under my canoe while I was fishing for muskellunge in the St. Francis River.

All were cool experiences. And so is this: Today’s trail camera submission is a video sent in by Bob Hall of Appleton. This beaver is working well into the night, and takes a brief break in front of Hall’s camera.

Among the various animals we’ve featured in this space, we’ve not seen many beavers. Until today.

Thanks for the video, Bob. I’m eager to see what you come up with next.

Do you have a trail camera photo or video to share? Send it to jholyoke@bangordailynews.com and tell us “I consent to the BDN using my photo.” In order to prevent neighbors from stopping by to try to tag particularly large bucks, moose or bears, some identities and towns of origin may be omitted.

John Holyoke

John Holyoke has been enjoying himself in Maine's great outdoors since he was a kid. He spent 28 years working for the BDN, including 19 years as the paper's outdoors columnist or outdoors editor. While...