Wild turkeys mill around near a feeder in this trail camera photo. Credit: Courtesy of Susan Mack

It’s been chilly in these parts lately — the 28-below-zero wind chill on Tuesday was a bit harsh — so I think it’s time to think warm thoughts and dream of the day, not so far in the future, when we’ll all be wearing shorts outside again.

I know, I know — We’ve all got one of those peculiar neighbors who simply refuses to wear long pants on even the most frigid Maine winter day.

We’re not talking about him.

We’re talking about the rest of us: The people who are quite eager for a day like one of today’s trail camera photos depicts.

Susan Mack captured these pics of wild turkeys in Liverpool, Louisiana, just a couple of days back. And while one of the pics shows that it’s 39 degrees at 8:41 a.m., the other proves that warmer weather is on the way: It’s 82 degrees at 1:26 p.m. a day later.

A tom turkey struts, but the hens don’t seem interested in this trail camera photo. Credit: Courtesy of Susan Mack

To me, an 82-degree day (or even a photo of one) sounds pretty good right about now.

“This is a picture from my game camera showing wild turkeys at the deer feeder. You can tell it’s breeding season from the bright colors on the tom turkeys,” Mack said.

The second photo shows a tom strutting for hens that seem to be paying him little attention.

I’m sure plenty of Mainers have trail camera photos of turkeys, and I’ve certainly received a few over the past several months. Keep those photos coming, by all means. Just don’t feel slighted by my inclusion of some southern birds in this trail camera feature. I think thoughts of warmer days are just what many of us need right now.

Do you have a trail camera photo or video to share? Send it to jholyoke@bangordailynews.com and tell us “I consent to the BDN using my photo.” In order to prevent neighbors from stopping by to try to tag particularly large bucks, moose or bears, some identities and towns of origin may be omitted.


John Holyoke

John Holyoke has been enjoying himself in Maine's great outdoors since he was a kid. He spent 28 years working for the BDN, including 19 years as the paper's outdoors columnist or outdoors editor. While...