In this Sept. 27, 1983 file photo, Country Music singers Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers rehearse a song for their appearance on the TV show "Live... And in Person" in Los Angeles. Credit: Doug Pizac | AP

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Have you already run out of stuff to watch on TV? Already binged “Tiger King” and “Ozark,” re-watched a million episodes of “The Office,” cringed through “Love is Blind”? Here’s a bunch more stuff to whet your whistle while you’re stuck at home — dramas, comedies, romances, documentaries and even an entirely new streaming platform with original content.

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“The Gene: An Intimate History” on PBS

Just six months after the monumental “Country Music,” Ken Burns’ new documentary series started on PBS this Tuesday. “The Gene: An Intimate History,” inspired by the book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Siddhartha Mukherjee, is a four-hour series documenting the history of genetic science — from Gregor Mendel’s groundbreaking research in the 1850s and 60s, to contemporary gene-editing tool CRISPR. The first episode aired on Tuesday; episode two airs on April 14. The PBS app is free to use, though to watch older episodes you need an MPBN membership.

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“Run” on HBO

“Fleabag” creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s streak of producing compelling, darkly funny television continues with “Run,” a new series debuting on HBO this Sunday, created by her longtime collaborator Vicky Jones. The premise: two people who dated in college made a promise that if either of them ever sent a message reading “RUN,” and the other responded with the same within 24 hours, they’d drop everything and meet in New York City to spend a week together. Starring Merritt Wever and Domnhall Gleeson, it’s bound to be a wild ride. And if that weren’t enough, it premieres the same day as season three of Waller-Bridge’s other compelling, darkly funny show, “Killing Eve” on AMC.

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“Belgravia” on Epix

Do you miss “Downton Abbey”? You’re in luck, period drama lovers, as Julian Fellowes has returned to offer you another sumptuously costumed peek into British class warfare. This one is set in the 1840s, and tells the story of two families living in the wealthy London enclave, Belgravia — aristocratic old money, and upstart new money. Good heavens, this shall be a soapy delight. It starts Sunday, on Epix, which you can sign up for through Amazon, Apple TV, Roku or YouTube.

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Kenny, Dolly and Willie on A&E

Cable channel A&E will premiere three separate specials over the course of two days, on three country music icons: Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson and the dearly departed Kenny Rogers. The first one up is “Biography: Dolly,” set for 8 p.m. on Sunday. It’s followed immediately by “Willie Nelson: American Outlaw,” a tribute concert special filmed back in January, featuring Willie songs played by everyone from Jimmy Buffett to Chris Stapleton. “Biography: Kenny Rogers,” about the late, great singer, airs at 9 p.m. on Monday.

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“Mrs. America” on Hulu

Cate Blanchett takes on the daunting role of Phyllis Schlafly, the arch-nemesis of the women’s rights movement, in a period piece exploring the roots of the current culture wars. As figures like Gloria Steinem, Shirley Chisholm and Betty Friedan tried to get the Equal Rights Amendment passed, Schlafly was there to stop them in their tracks — and help build the Christian fundamentalist wing of the Republican party. It premieres Wednesday on Hulu.

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“Middleditch & Schwartz” on Netflix

You might not know their names, but you might know their faces. Thomas Middleditch, who played lead character Richard Hendricks on “Silicon Valley,” and Ben Schwartz, best known as Jean-Ralphio on “Parks & Recreation,” are a comedy duo, and their new Netflix mini-series, based on a live tour they did last year, is a masterclass in improv. Expect immense silliness. It goes up on April 21.

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So what is Quibi, anyway?

Earlier this week, Quibi (pronounced Quibby), an entirely new streaming platform, launched, with a whopping 50 shows in its initial lineup, all of which feature episodes that are 10 minutes or less. The catch? It’s only available to watch on your phone or tablet. Right now you can’t watch it on your TV or your laptop. While this may have been a great idea in a world where people were on the go on a daily basis, right now, since we’re stuck at home, watching stuff on your phone might not be the ideal way to consume media.

That said, Quibi’s offerings vary widely in subject and quality. Like reality TV? Try “Chrissy’s Court,” featuring the internet’s favorite hot mom, Chrissy Teigan, judging cases like Judge Judy. Prefer a scripted drama? Try “The Most Dangerous Game” with Liam Hemsworth and Christoph Waltz. For comedy, there’s “Flipped,” with Will Forte and Kaitlin Olson. There are reboots of old MTV shows “Punk’d” and “Singled Out.” There’s “Nightgowns,” featuring the incredible art of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” queen Sasha Velour. There’s “Dishmantled,” a ridiculous cooking competition. And so on. The first three months of Quibi are free. Why not give it a shot — what else are you doing?

Emily Burnham

Emily Burnham

Emily Burnham is a Maine native and proud Bangorian, covering business, the arts, restaurants and the culture and history of the Bangor region.