May 26, 2019
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How Maine’s members of Congress voted this week

Carolyn Kaster | AP
Carolyn Kaster | AP
From left, Rep. Chellie Pingree, D-Maine, and Rep. Kim Schrier, D-Wash., walk to a closed Democratic Caucus meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Jan. 4, 2019.

WASHINGTON — Here’s a look at how Maine’s members of Congress voted last week.

Along with roll call votes this week, the Senate also passed the Medicaid Services Investment and Accountability Act (H.R. 1839), to extend protection for Medicaid recipients of home and community-based services against spousal impoverishment, establish a state Medicaid option to provide coordinated care to children with complex medical conditions through health homes, and prevent the misclassification of drugs for purposes of the Medicaid drug rebate program.

The House passed: the Department of Homeland Security Morale, Recognition, Learning and Engagement Act (H.R. 1433), to improve morale within the Homeland Security workforce by conferring new responsibilities to the Chief Human Capital Officer, establishing an employee engagement steering committee, requiring action plans, and authorizing an annual employee award program; and the CBRN Intelligence and Information Sharing Act (H.R. 1589), to establish chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear intelligence and information sharing functions of the Office of Intelligence and Analysis of the Department of Homeland Security and to require dissemination of information analyzed by the Department to entities with responsibilities relating to homeland security.

House votes

House Vote 1:

SCHOOL SAFETY COUNCIL: The House has passed the Coordinating and Leveraging Activities for School Security Act (H.R. 1593), sponsored by Rep. Donald M. Payne Jr., D-N.J., to establish at the Homeland Security Department a council charged with coordinating the development of strategies to protect schools against mass shootings and terrorism. Payne said the council would help instruct state and local education agencies about the best ways to ensure school safety. The vote, on April 1, was 384 yeas to 18 nays.

YEAS: Pingree D-ME (1st), Golden D-ME (2nd)

House Vote 2:

PREVENTING TRAVEL BY TERRORISTS: The House has passed the Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travel Exercise Act (H.R. 1590), sponsored by Rep. Michael Guest, R-Miss., to require the Homeland Security Department to carry out an exercise for preventing travel both into the U.S. and overseas by terrorists and people seeking to join terrorist groups. Guest said law enforcement groups “need to have access to the valuable information and resources that this bill would provide so that our communities can be protected from terrorist activity.” The vote, on April 1, was 394 yeas to 7 nays.

YEAS: Pingree D-ME (1st), Golden D-ME (2nd)

House Vote 3:

OVERTURNING OBAMACARE: The House has passed a resolution (H. Res. 271), sponsored by Rep. Colin Z. Allred, D-Texas, urging the Justice Department to stop arguing, in the legal case of Texas v. United States, in support of the effort by Texas and other states to have the health care reform law (Obamacare) overturned. Allred said: “As this administration seeks to tear down our healthcare system, this Congress will not stand by while cynical and partisan interests attack our healthcare system and that of hardworking Americans.” A resolution opponent, Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., said the health care reform law has not worked, and Walden called on Democrats to work with Republicans on bipartisan legislation to improve health care rather than “play politics with healthcare and attack the president for political purposes.” The vote, on April 3, was 240 yeas to 186 nays, with 1 voting present.

YEAS: Pingree D-ME (1st), Golden D-ME (2nd)

House Vote 4:

SEXUAL VIOLENCE ON CAMPUS: The House has passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., to the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (H.R. 1585). The amendment would authorize grants for the purpose of reducing sexual violence on college campuses, including by training college employees on how to interview students claiming to have been victims of such violence. Waters said the interview training would ensure that students reporting alleged violence are not “made to feel that they are at fault, that they will be punished, or that they should feel shame.” An opponent, Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., said allegations of criminal violence should be handled by law enforcement agencies rather than college employees, and the interview training grants would create the implication that collegiate sexual violence should be treated differently than other crimes. The vote, on April 3, was 258 yeas to 173 nays.

YEAS: Pingree D-ME (1st), Golden D-ME (2nd)

House Vote 5:

INTERVENTION IN YEMEN: The House has passed a resolution (S.J. Res. 7), sponsored by Sen. Bernie Sanders, ID-Vt., to require the removal from Yemen, within 30 days, of U.S. soldiers stationed there, barring congressional authorization of the use of force in Yemen. A supporter, Rep. Eliot L. Engel, D-N.Y., said U.S. involvement in the Saudi Arabia-led coalition intervening in Yemen’s civil war should not continue because the war has put millions of Yemeni children on the brink of famine, with hundreds of thousands suffering from cholera. An opponent, Rep. Michael T. McCaul, R-Texas, said the U.S. did not have forces in Yemen, making the resolution irrelevant to the question of what U.S. policy on the Yemeni civil war should be. The vote, on April 4, was 247 yeas to 175 nays, with 1 voting present.

YEAS: Pingree D-ME (1st), Golden D-ME (2nd)

House Vote 6:

VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN: The House has passed the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (H.R. 1585), sponsored by Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif. Bass said the reauthorization was needed “to better deal with the gaping holes left unfilled in current law around the issues of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, harassment, and stalking.” A bill opponent, Rep. Elise M. Stefanik, R-N.Y., said it was a partisan, politicized measure with no chance of passing the Senate. The vote, on April 4, was 263 yeas to 158 nays, with 1 voting present.

YEAS: Pingree D-ME (1st), Golden D-ME (2nd)

Senate votes

Senate Vote 1:

DEBATING PRESIDENTIAL NOMINATIONS: The Senate has voted to uphold an appeal by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of a ruling by the Senate chair. The appeal would limit post-cloture debate time on presidential nominations for positions below that of head of a Cabinet agency to at most two hours. McConnell said the two-hour limit would end a “completely outrageous level of interference and obstruction with this administration” by Senate Democrats who have refused to allow votes on President Trump’s executive branch nominees. An opponent, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said the two-hour limit would degrade the Senate’s role of advising and consenting on presidential nominations by turning the chamber “into a conveyer belt for ideological conservatives” for the duration of the Trump administration. The vote to uphold the chair’s ruling, on April 3, was 48 yeas to 51 nays, and therefore McConnell’s appeal was approved.

YEAS: Collins R-ME, King I-ME

Senate Vote 2:

DEBATING JUDICIAL NOMINATIONS: The Senate has voted to uphold an appeal by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of a ruling by the Senate chair. The appeal would limit post-cloture debate time on presidential nominations for the judiciary at the district court level to at most two hours. McConnell said the two-hour limit on debating nominations for district judges was needed because of unprecedented and excessive levels of Democratic opposition to votes on judiciary nominees since President Trump took office. An opponent, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called the appeal part of a Republican effort to “use the courts to adopt the far-right agenda that Republicans know they cannot enact through the legislative process.” The vote to uphold the chair’s ruling, on April 3, was 48 yeas to 51 nays, and therefore McConnell’s appeal was approved.

YEAS: Collins R-ME, King I-ME

Senate Vote 3:

FLORIDA DISTRICT JUDGE: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Roy Kalman Altman to serve as a judge on the U.S. district court for the Southern District of Florida. Altman, an assistant U.S. attorney in the district from 2008 to 2014, is currently a partner at the Podhurst Orseck law firm in Miami. The vote, on April 4, was 66 yeas to 33 nays.

YEAS: Collins R-ME

NAYS: King I-ME

Senate Vote 4:

MORTGAGE FINANCING AGENCY: The Senate has confirmed the nomination of Mark Anthony Calabria to serve as the director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency for a five-year term. Calabria, currently the chief economist to Vice President Mike Pence, has been a housing economist for the Senate Banking Committee, in the George W. Bush administration, in academia, and in the private sector. A supporter, Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., called Calabria “an extraordinarily qualified and capable man” who would work to reform housing finance if confirmed. An opponent, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Calabria did not support federal guarantees of mortgages above $200,000 and did not support the 30-year mortgage. The vote, on April 4, was 52 yeas to 44 nays.

YEAS: Collins R-ME

NAYS: King I-ME



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