May 20, 2019
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How Maine’s members of Congress voted this week

Jacquelyn Martin | AP
Jacquelyn Martin | AP
In this Feb. 7, 2018 file photo Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, speaks about immigration on Capitol Hill in Washington.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 1 — Here’s a look at how area members of Congress voted over the previous week.

Along with roll call votes this week, the Senate also passed the Further Additional Continuing Appropriations Act (H.J. Res. 28), making further continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2019; and a bill (H.J. Res. 31), making further continuing appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for fiscal year 2019.

The House also passed the Further Additional Continuing Appropriations Act (H.J. Res. 28), making further continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2019; the Department of Homeland Security Clearance Management and Administration Act (H.R. 424), to improve the management and administration of the security clearance processes throughout the Department of Homeland Security; the Federal Information Resource to Strengthen Ties with State and Local Law Enforcement Act (H.R. 495), to require an annual report on the Office for State and Local Law Enforcement; and passed a motion to go to conference with the Senate for a bill (H.J. Res. 31), making further continuing appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for fiscal year 2019.

House votes

House Vote 1:
INSIDER TRADING OF STOCKS: The House has passed the Promoting Transparent Standards for Corporate Insiders Act (H.R. 624), sponsored by Rep. Maxine Waters, D-California, to require a Securities and Exchange Commission study of possible changes to the regulation of Rule 10b5-1 trading plans that allow employees of publicly traded companies to sell shares without violating insider trading prohibitions. Waters said loopholes in the 10b5-1 rule could allow executives to use their trading plans as a cover for illicit insider sales of stock based on private knowledge of their companies, making a change desirable. The vote, on Jan. 28, was 413 yeas to 3 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

House Vote 2:
ONLINE TRAFFICKING EXCHANGES: The House has passed the Fight Illicit Networks and Detect Trafficking Act (H.R. 502), sponsored by Rep. Juan Vargas, D-California, to require a study by the U.S. Comptroller General of the use of virtual currencies and online marketplaces for trading and financing of goods and services related to sex trafficking and drug trafficking. Vargas said the study could lead to legislation that blocks the use of online exchanges that “have been, and continue to be, exploited to pay for goods and services associated with illicit sex and drug trafficking.” The vote, on Jan. 28, was 412 yeas to 3 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

House Vote 3:
VIRTUAL CURRENCIES AND TERRORISM: The House has passed the Homeland Security Assessment of Terrorists’ Use of Virtual Currencies Act (H.R. 428), sponsored by Rep. Kathleen M. Rice, D-New York, to require the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Intelligence and Analysis to publish a threat assessment of the use of virtual currencies by terrorists. Rice said the ability to anonymously use virtual currencies makes them “particularly attractive to those seeking to circumvent American law enforcement and financial institutions. In order to effectively confront this threat, we need to fully understand it” by doing the threat assessment. The vote, on Jan. 29, was 422 yeas to 3 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

House Vote 4:
HOMELAND SECURITY AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT: The House has passed the Pathways to Improving Homeland Security at the Local Level Act (H.R. 449), sponsored by Rep. Val Butler Demings, D-Florida, to require the Homeland Security Department to annually distribute a catalog describing the agency’s training, publications, programs, and services for state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies. Demings said sending out the catalog will help Homeland Security partner with non-federal law enforcement to better protect the homeland. The vote, on Jan. 29, was 412 yeas to 12 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

House Vote 5:
COUNTERTERRORISM ADVISORY BOARD: The House has passed the Counterterrorism Advisory Board Act (H.R. 769), sponsored by Rep. John Katko, R-New York, to establish an advisory board at the Homeland Security Department for coordinating and integrating the agency’s counterterrorism intelligence, activities, and policies. Katko said the board currently existed only on an informal basis, and codifying it into law would work to help “ensure DHS is using all available resources to identify and prevent terrorists from coming to the United States.” The vote, on Jan. 29, was 414 yeas to 12 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

House Vote 6:
CONSUMER CREDIT AND GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: The House has passed a motion to table a motion to reconsider a bill (H. Res. 77), sponsored by Rep. Maxine Waters, D-California, to express the sense of Congress that consumers facing short-term financial hardship and potential long-term damage to their creditworthiness due to the partial government shutdown should get relief from their banks and other financial companies. Waters said the bill sought to “send a strong message to the financial industry that they should do what they can to help these innocent consumers.” An opponent of the motion to table, Rep. Andy Harris, R-Maryland, said the bill had an excessively broad definition of the class of consumers affected by the shutdown. The vote, on Jan. 29, was 240 yeas to 176 nays. The House then passed the bill by voice vote.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

House Vote 7:
PAY HIKE FOR GOVERNMENT WORKERS: The House has passed the Federal Civilian Workforce Pay Raise Fairness Act (H.R. 790), sponsored by Rep. Gerald E. Connolly, D-Virginia, to increase 2019 pay for most civilian workers in the federal government by 2.6 percent. Connolly called the bill a statement “that we do respect the work of our civil servants and our federal employees and that we are prepared to provide concrete measures to do that.” An opponent, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said government workers already received higher pay than their peers in the private sector, and the 2.6 percent raise would increase the burden on those private sector workers. The vote, on Jan. 30, was 259 yeas to 161 nays.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

House Vote 8:
GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWNS: The House has rejected a resolution (H. Res. 79), sponsored by Rep. Jennifer Wexton, D-Virginia, that would have expressed the sense of the House that government shutdowns harm the U.S. and are not an acceptable method for resolving differences within Congress and/or the presidency. Wexton said: “We owe assurances to the millions of federal civilian workers, including the hundreds of thousands who were furloughed earlier this month, that Congress will ensure continued, uninterrupted operations of the federal government.” An opponent, Rep. Scott Perry, R-Pennsylvania, said the resolution was political theater that attempted to blame Republicans for the shutdown rather than work on a solution to the country’s border security needs. The vote, on Jan. 30, was 249 yeas to 163 nays, with a two-thirds majority required for approval.
YEAS: Pingree D-Maine (1st), Golden D-Maine (2nd)

Senate votes

Senate Vote 1:
TROOPS IN SYRIA AND AFGHANISTAN: The Senate has passed a cloture motion to end debate on an amendment sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, to the Strengthening America’s Security in the Middle East Act (S. 1). The amendment would express the sense of the Senate cautioning that a rapid withdrawal of U.S. troops from either Syria or Afghanistan could put at risk hard-won gains against terrorist groups and U.S. national security improvements achieved in the two countries. McConnell said it sought to put the Senate “on the record about what our country should be doing in Syria and Afghanistan” at a time of debate over the extent to which the U.S. should intervene there. An opponent, Sen. John Kennedy, R-Louisiana, questioned whether the U.S. mission in Syria and Afghanistan was turning from protecting national security to the difficult and costly goal of nation-building. The vote to end debate, on Jan. 31, was 68 yeas to 23 nays.
YEAS: Collins R-Maine, King I-Maine



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