Landing craft on the beach during D-Day on June 6, 1944 in France. Seventy-five years later, surprising color images of the D-Day invasion and aftermath bring an immediacy to wartime memories. They were filmed by Hollywood director George Stevens and rediscovered years after his death. Credit: George Stevens | AP

As veterans and world leaders prepare to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day next week, Director George Stevens’ surprising color images bring an immediacy to wartime memories, a powerful reminder of the war’s impact and its heroes as those who witnessed the war are dying out.

“You’ve seen it in black and white. And when you see it in color, all of a sudden it feels like today,” his son George Stevens Jr. told the Associated Press. “It doesn’t seem like yesterday. And it has a much more modern and authentic feeling to it.”

Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP
Credit: George Stevens | AP