Julia Bayly

Julia Bayly

Fort Kent

 
FIDDLEHEAD FOCUS

Cycling’s current technology started but could not stay in northern Maine

on Nov. 03, 2016, at 1:06 a.m.
(From the BDN) “We did pretty much everything right there at the factory,” former employee John Desjardins said. “Every single bike we made was built completely by hand.”
JULIA BAYLY
Saying goodbye to Corky, my friend and constant companion for 12 years was among the hardest things I have ever had to do.

Final words on Corky, the Rusty Metal Farm shusky

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 27, 2016, at 11:27 a.m.
Julia Bayly: According to an online BDN linked search engine, I’ve written about Corky 125 times in the 12 years she lived on Rusty Metal Farm. This column is the 126th and quite likely last time I will do so.
Painted and unpainted frames wait for build-ups that will never happen in the former Aegis Bicycle factory in Van Buren.

Cycling’s current technology started but could not stay in northern Maine

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 26, 2016, at 7:49 a.m.
“We did pretty much everything right there at the factory,” former employee John Desjardins said. “Every single bike we made was built completely by hand.”
Lise Pelletier, director of the Acadian Archives at the University of Maine at Fort Kent, opens a display case containing original maps from the 1500s on display.

Three centuries of mapping ‘you are here’ on display in Fort Kent

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 18, 2016, at 7:05 a.m.
“It’s so interesting to see how maps of a single area changed over time with new information.”
JULIA BAYLY
Julia Bayly

Fighting the hobgoblins of consistency on Rusty Metal Farm

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 13, 2016, at 1:01 p.m.
People who know me, know my resistance to change. Call it “being in a rut,” if you will, but here on Rusty Metal Farm, it’s been all about consistency.
Images captured by Raptor Maps' drones are combined with computer data taken in the field to provide farmers with real-time crop analysis.

Drone technology, computers ushering in a brave new world for northern Maine potatoes

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 12, 2016, at 10:19 a.m.
Tom Wolf, a farm apprentice from New Orleans, Louisiana washes carrots at the Four Season Farm in Brooksville in 2015.

Coastal city may join food sovereignty movement in Maine

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 11, 2016, at 10:41 a.m.
The Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry says it wants to make sure all food sold in Maine is safe for the consumer.
VIDEO
Jason Johnson (right) of Sturdi-Bilt Storage Buildings discusses camp options with potential customer Ron Iverson of Old Lyme, Connecticut, on Sept. 28 inside a camp completed for another family at the business' main offices in Smyrna Mills. Johnson manages the sales and supply of the Amish owner-operator business.

Meet the Maine Amish community making tiny houses, sheds by hand

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 07, 2016, at 6:24 a.m.
In two workshops, eight craftsman, each members of the 20-family Smyrna Amish church, work year-round building everything from simple storage sheds to elaborate camps ready for occupation.
A sign along the shore of Rangeley Lake warns residents and visitors about the thin line of string used by the town to prevent Canada geese from walking into the park from the lake.

Fake coyotes, fence helps keep messy geese off Rangeley’s park grass

By Julia Bayly on Oct. 07, 2016, at 1 a.m.
“They eat around the shore of the lake in the short grass and then defecate all over the park.”
FIDDLEHEAD FOCUS

Declining numbers could propel Maine bumblebee to federal endangered species status

on Oct. 05, 2016, at 1:07 a.m.
(From the BDN) The rusty patched bumblebee is under consideration for federal endangered species status.
JULIA BAYLY
To date, the view from the outhouse on Mt. Aconcagua in Argentina ranks No. 1.

No matter where you are, domestic and international calls from nature must be answered

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 29, 2016, at 9:41 a.m.
Julia Bayly: It’s a big world out there, and I have loads of future travel plans that will doubtless involve outhouses of varying styles and locations. Frankly, I can’t wait to get the call.
The five-week controlled moose hunt in Aroostook County is credited with reducing moose damage in broccoli fields.

Moose hunt a win for Maine veterans, broccoli crops

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 28, 2016, at 11 a.m.
“We have not seen the moose eating the broccoli the last few years like we were before the controlled hunt,” Emily Smith of Smith Farms in Presque Isle said. “Those moose, they really do like the broccoli.”
The rusty patched bumblebee is under consideration for federal endangered species status.

Declining numbers could propel Maine bumblebee to federal endangered species status

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 27, 2016, at 4:03 p.m.
One of Maine’s smallest creatures could soon find itself on the federal endangered species list.
Harvested trees and equipment can be seen in Patten in this September 2016 file photo.

Money does grow from trees for some Maine municipalities

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 23, 2016, at 2:15 p.m.
There was a time in the early years of Maine statehood that trees were the coin of the realm.
Terry Kelly turns a chair spindle on his lathe.

Presque Isle chair-maker turning out one handmade piece at a time

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 22, 2016, at 8:06 a.m.
Terry Kelly is a one-of-a-kind craftsman in a mass-production world. He has shipped his creations all over the country, including Texas and California and has pieces on display at Casco Bay Artisans in Portland.
Kristen Miale, executive director of Good Shepherd Food Bank of Maine, talks about how the organization's new 40,000-square-foot facility in Hampden will help ensure healthy vegetables and produce make it to the tables of hungry Mainers in this November 2015 file photo.

BDN, Good Shepherd team up to shine spotlight on hunger in Maine

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 18, 2016, at 7:24 a.m.
Data collected by the Good Shepherd Food Bank in 2014 showed more than 206,000 Mainers — or 16 percent of the state’s total population — are living with food insecurity,
VIDEO
A former horse barn on the land in Passadumkeag near the Penobscot River that Tim Shay, president of the Wabanaki Cultural Preservation Commission, has been trying to help purchase in order to establish a center for culture and healing can be seen Thursday.

Maine tribes looking to purchase traditional lands for healing center

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 17, 2016, at 7:32 a.m.
Members of Maine’s Wabanaki tribes are hoping a planned purchase of land along the Penobscot River is the first step in establishing a center for culture and healing in the state.
Rusty Metal Chickens practicing for the catwalk can get a bit distracted by tasty greens and grubs on the ground.

Move over Calendar Girls, it’s time for Rusty Metal Farm poultry photo shoot

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 15, 2016, at 2:35 p.m.
%gP5T3KfTZmRaNcCnn2BfA

Model chickens at Rusty Metal Farm

By Julia Bayly on Sept. 15, 2016, at 2:30 p.m.
ACCIDENTAL ADVENTURE

Acadia is Maine’s #1 ranked bicycle ride — and even better when it’s car-free

on Sept. 15, 2016, at 11:46 a.m.