Hundreds protest sexual violence with walk to National Mall in Washington

Posted Aug. 14, 2011, at 8:53 p.m.

WASHINGTON — More than 1,000 women, men and children from all walks of life took to the streets of Washington Saturday in a so-called SlutWalk to protest sexual violence.

Demanding victims not be blamed for sexual assault against them, they marched from Lafayette Park outside the White House to the grassy National Mall and the monuments at the heart of the city.

They carried signs reading, “Blame the rapist not the victims,” “No means no,” and “This is my hot body and I do what I want to.”

The U.S. capital is one of dozens of cities worldwide that have featured such events in recent months, including a march in Berlin earlier Saturday.

An estimated 350 people took part in Munich and 250 in Hamburg and Frankfurt, carrying signs reading “Say no to violence against women,” and “My skirt is none of your business.”

Slutwalks have been staged in New Delhi and Buenos Aires as well.

Pakistani police don’t know who kidnapped American

ISLAMABAD — Authorities searched for clues about who kidnapped an American in Pakistan but came up with no leads after questioning the guards at his house where he was abducted, police said Sunday.

Gunmen snatched development expert Warren Weinstein, 70, before dawn Saturday after tricking his guards and breaking into his house in the eastern city of Lahore, a brazen raid that heightened fears among aid workers, diplomats and other foreigners already worried about Islamic militancy and anti-U.S. sentiment in Pakistan.

Weinstein is the country director for J.E. Austin Associates, a development contractor that has received millions of dollars from the aid arm of the U.S. government, according to a profile on LinkedIn, a networking website. He had told his staff that he would be wrapping up his latest project and moving out of Pakistan by Monday, just a couple days after he was kidnapped.

Syrian gunboats join fresh attack against protesters

BEIRUT — Syrian troops backed by gunboats and tanks expanded their offensive against pro-democracy protesters to the coastal town of Latakia on Sunday, in continued defiance of growing international pressure on the Syrian government to halt the violence and implement reforms.

Human rights groups said at least 21 people were killed in the latest assault, in which tanks and, for the first time, gunboats were used to shell seafront neighborhoods of the city that had routinely been staging demonstrations calling for the downfall of President Bashar al-Assad.

More than 2,000 people have been killed in the government crackdown, at least 300 of them since the military launched a heightened offensive against the protest movement two weeks ago.

SEE COMMENTS →

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business