Articles by Wayne E. Reilly

 
WAYNE E. REILLY

Bangor joined ‘the Telephone Nation’ a century ago

By Wayne E. Reilly on Dec. 04, 2016, at 4:20 p.m.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

Bangor businesses — and crooks — saw big money in junk a century ago

By Wayne E. Reilly on Nov. 20, 2016, at 11:12 a.m.
“Bangor is being well surfeited with junk. It has been junk, junk, junk since the first Monday in May,” a Bangor reporter said in May 1916.
WAYNE E. REILLY
The Park Theater was located at the corner of State and Park streets in Bangor. Today the spot is a parking lot.

When Hollywood arrived in Bangor a century ago

By Wayne E. Reilly on Nov. 06, 2016, at 12 p.m.
The most exciting entertainment story of the season, however, was the arrival in Bangor of a movie troupe complete with famous actors.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

Bangor cheered when Johnny came marching home

By Wayne E. Reilly on Oct. 23, 2016, at 12:32 p.m.
Crowds assembled throughout Bangor to welcome home the National Guard troops who were returning from a stint defending the U.S.-Mexico border.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Bangor’s harbor was once crowded with sailing ships as this scene at the mouth of the Kenduskeag Stream in the 1880s shows. The railroad drawbridge enabled vessels to sail up the stream to pick up and deliver cargo at warehouses.

What happened to Bangor’s ‘forest of masts’?

By Wayne E. Reilly on Oct. 09, 2016, at 12:01 p.m.
Of all the changes to Bangor in the past 150 years, none seems more dramatic today than the decline of maritime commerce in the city’s harbor.
WAYNE E. REILLY
The first sidewalk gas pump in Bangor appeared in front of L.P. Swett's automobile dealership at 106 Harlow St. Swett offered to sell gasoline at 20 cents a gallon to every customer who bought one of his Reo or Hudson autos between April 24 and Oct. 24, 1916.

Joy riders and just plain terrible ‘autoists’ fueled mayhem on Queen City streets

By Wayne E. Reilly on Sept. 25, 2016, at 12:09 p.m.
To many people, automobiles were a nuisance, belching clouds of smoke, noisier even than horse-drawn wagons and dangerous. And a species of drivers simply called “road hogs” were causing a great deal of irritation among polite folks.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

20 wealthy men supported Bangor soldiers’ families during Mexican expedition of 1916

By Wayne E. Reilly on Sept. 11, 2016, at 1:55 p.m.
City officials were still trying to decide how to support the soldiers’ wives and children who had depended on their husband’s wages.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

A trolley strike closed Bangor’s 112 saloons — at least, temporarily — a century ago

By Wayne E. Reilly on Aug. 28, 2016, at 1:23 p.m.
Few people in Bangor thought a temporary solution to all its drunken mayhem would be a trolley strike.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

A mission to Texas gave Maine troops a taste of Army life before WWI

By Wayne E. Reilly on Aug. 14, 2016, at 12:29 p.m.
Perhaps there would be a war, some thought, but tensions cooled off quickly. It would definitely help prepare them for The Great War raging in Europe, where many would be shipped the following year.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

Summer of doom and gloom afflicted Bangor a century ago

By Wayne E. Reilly on July 31, 2016, at 12:09 p.m.
“Let somebody be cheerful in this year of gloom,” a reporter concluded in 1916.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

Chautauqua tent show visited Bangor in 1916

By Wayne E. Reilly on July 17, 2016, at 7:27 a.m.
A century ago Bangor offered a wide variety of entertainment ranging from movies, vaudeville, opera and live drama to circuses, concerts, sports events and the ever popular Eastern Maine State Fair. Was there room in 1916 for any more — like a five-day Chautauqua tent show?
WAYNE REILLY
Inside the open-air theater at Riverside Park

Gypsy wagons, cannon crackers marked start of summer in 1916

By Wayne E. Reilly on July 03, 2016, at 9:12 a.m.
Wayne Reilly: In order to get ready for all these new folks and attractions, many people thought Bangor should clean up its rough hewn image as a lumbering town.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Bangor soldiers decorated their train with graffiti on their way to Texas in 1916.

Bangor boys stepped up to fight as US, Mexico came close to war

By Wayne E. Reilly on June 19, 2016, at 9:14 a.m.
Bangor boys were itching to fight in a war a century ago. They soon would have their opportunity.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

A century ago, Bangor was a ‘Modern Babylon’ on the Penobscot

By Wayne E. Reilly on June 05, 2016, at 11:52 a.m.
Public intoxication remained one of Bangor’s biggest crime a century ago.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

Police nab college men looking for a taste of hobo life

By Wayne E. Reilly on May 22, 2016, at 9:42 a.m.
Warm weather meant hoboes would soon be riding the rails into eastern and northern Maine a century ago. But not all the hoboes were for real like those described by Jack London.
WAYNE E. REILLY
If you bought an automobile in Bangor a century ago, some dealers offered cheap gasoline as well.

A century ago, Bangor faced a traffic mess

By Wayne E. Reilly on May 08, 2016, at 2:33 p.m.
A growing battle for control of the streets of Bangor pitted autos against trolleys and horses a century ago.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

Bangoreans made big profits shipping rum, coal, wood during WWI

By Wayne E. Reilly on April 24, 2016, at 1 p.m.
Bangoreans lamented the decline of their harbor as a lumber port a century ago. But anyone who owned a sailing vessel still was making plenty of money.
WAYNE E. REILLY
The Windsor Hotel in Bangor before the fire of 1911.

Wealthy Bangor snowbirds missed the glory of spring a century ago

By Wayne E. Reilly on April 10, 2016, at 11:05 a.m.
A trip to Bangor in the spring enabled one to witness ice-out on the Penobscot River and all that came after.
WAYNE REILLY
Wayne E. Reilly

Booze, brawls enlivened old Bangor in Springtime

By Wayne E. Reilly on March 27, 2016, at 2:55 p.m.
First, the loggers began arriving from the woods. Then the mayhem picked up in the days ahead.
WAYNE E. REILLY
Wayne Reilly

Bangor laundrymen prosecuted under Chinese Exclusion Act

By Wayne E. Reilly on March 13, 2016, at 11:43 a.m.
They were merely laborers — victims of one of the most racially charged laws in U.S. history — trying to support themselves in Bangor’s Chinese laundries.