Credit: George Danby / BDN

Letters submitted by BDN readers are verified by BDN Opinion Page staff. Send your letters to letters@bangordailynews.com.

Praying for our success against COVID-19

Reading Caitlin Andrews’ Jan. 16 article on the federal government’s COVID-19 vaccine supply was heartbreaking. Knowing that thousands of Mainers and Americans have been infected only reminds me of the vaccine dosages that the former administration had turned down. Having the chance to further bolster our supply could have made the rollout much faster.

There have been many who believed we would be in a COVID vaccine glut with too many dosages available, and not enough people to administer them. The United States has sadly faced one failure after another when controlling the pandemic with nearly 25 percent of worldwide infections stemming from the U.S. alone.

No other country comes close to the failures seen here, from the politicization of mask wearing to a divided, rather than united, effort across the states. Many young Americans entering the workforce have been excluded from direct stimulus payments, and many have not received their benefits.

The Biden administration now has its chance to combat the overwhelming situation we all face. As an American, my hopes and prayers are for our success in saving as many lives as we can. There has been a lot happening in our country for the last year, and in most recent events, that has torn us apart. Today I hope and pray for our success in uniting to save as many lives as we can.

James West

Bangor

This wasn’t a peaceful transition of power

Our long-standing tradition of a peaceful transfer of power has been broken by the former president and the members of Congress who stoked his lies. I am furious! I am also deeply sad. When I see troops surrounding our Capitol building, my heart breaks at what we’ve lost.

We have always been the shining city on the hill, giving hope to the world that democracy can be sustained. As Abraham Lincoln proclaimed, at Gettysburg, “…government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth.” The president and his backers in Congress displayed a selfish lust for power that damaged our sacred trust in our democracy and the institutions and norms that uphold it.

If Sen. Susan Collins does not vote to convict Donald Trump for inciting the insurrection to overthrow the results of our election, I believe she condones his behavior and invites future attacks on our democracy. She is either for a democratically elected, peaceful transfer of power or she isn’t.

Joyce Schelling

Orland

An instrument of the American people

President Ronald Reagan said that ours is the only nation whose anthem ends with a question. In this time of national crises, it is for us to answer that question.

The Revolution of 1776 was for the creation of America. The Civil War was for the preservation of America. World War II was for the protection of America.

In his farewell speech to Springfield, Abraham Lincoln said that without divine guidance he could not succeed, but with that guidance he could not fail. He asked for prayers.

President Joe Biden is, as Franklin Roosevelt said in his first inaugural, “the present instrument” of the American people’s wishes. He is not a Washington, or a Lincoln, or a Roosevelt. He is one of us. And he needs our prayers.

Hal Wheeler

Bangor

A civics refresher

Doc Wallace stated in a recent letter to the BDN that he knows “all three branches of government will be controlled by Democrats.” The three branches of the U.S. government are the presidency, the Congress and the Supreme Court, who are meant to act as a set of checks and balances to each other.

Does the writer really believe that the Supreme Court is controlled by Democrats? Or is this yet another example of why this nation desperately needs to be taught American civics in school?

Clifton Page

East Blue Hill