May 29, 2020
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Wednesday, April 8, 2020: Jelly donuts in the apocalypse, getting through this together, take notes from Collins

Jelly donuts in the apocalypse

I’m ashamed to admit that it took a pandemic for me to realize the farmers of Maine could meet all my needs.

I’m a frugal Mainer, and bad habits die hard. Years ago, while teaching personal finance classes, I priced out my household staples at a variety of stores to find the lowest cost for what we ate at the time: Hannaford for dairy, Walmart for generics, and Save-a-Lot for everything else. I shopped at local stores and farmers’ markets frequently, but I always felt like it was a luxury.

Fast forward to 2020. Driven by social distancing and the climate of fear we currently face, I finally set up my Walmart curbside pickup shopping. I looked up my items and ordered online, only to find that no slots were available for pickup – not today, not tomorrow, seemingly not ever.

Then I looked at my list. Almost everything I needed or wanted was available on the “take out” form that my parents forwarded me from their little local store, Treats, in Wiscasset. I placed my order for carrots and apples, bread and cheese, butter and croissants – and I splurged a bit on prepared vegetable lasagna. Two days later, I unpacked the grocery bag that rounded out my pantry for the week.

Local stores have rallied for our community, arranging grocery orders and farm-to-store-to-car-to-table delivery. My farmer’s market is still open, taking care with cash and physical distancing.

Things still grow when hope dies. Tender shoots need harvest, even as panic spreads like mint run amok. As it turns out, all my needs are met. Bread, cheese, beans, vegetables, and pastries await. There are fresh jelly donuts in the apocalypse, and the baker will be back next week.

Erica Quin-Easter

Woolwich

Getting through this together

As a lifelong resident of Maine, I would like to thank those from away for appreciating our beautifully serene and quiet lifestyle. Tourism and seasonal property owners create a critical economic component to our livelihood. We truly appreciate them all for that.

An early in-migration of seasonal residents is occurring in our resort areas like Mount Desert Island, our many lakes, and rural areas close to the more affected population centers. Early seasonal property opening requests have risen significantly in the last few weeks. This could put a stress on our medical and service providers that we are not ready for if those who are fleeing the virus bring it to Maine.

Again, we appreciate them and their admiration of our great state. If they are moving here to be safe from the virus, they should please protect us and themselves from spreading it to the area they relocate to. With the rich and famous, royals, hospital CEOs, politicians and many others testing positive, we don’t need a higher risk occurring in Maine because they may be a carrier. They should please consider testing and should follow Gov. Janet Mills’ executive order to self-quarantine for 14 days after arriving.

The CDC recommendations of caution are also critical, such as 6 foot separation, hand washing, and cleaning of frequently touched surfaces, including gas pump handles for travelers.

As full-time or part-time Mainers, we will get through this. Everything will be alright when we work together. Stay safe.

Rep. Richard H. Campbell

Orrington

Staying connected in difficult times

I agree with the BDN editorial board in writing, “During this month of isolation, it will be important to periodically take stock of your wellbeing, as well as that of loved ones, neighbors and coworkers.” As this virus progresses it is hard to say when any restrictions that are put into place will end. There is no question that there are many elements of the spread of this virus that are uncertain. As a state and country, we need to take initiative to check in with one another to ensure that we are each doing well to cope with what is happening around us. This will also allow each of us to show one another that we care and that those struggling can persevere.

No one during this current situation should feel as though they are living in a silo. There are many opportunities for us to visit from afar. Whether it be through a phone call or through the plethora of video conferencing systems that are available for use. We live in an age where technology can aid us in staying connected. We each need to decide on what works best for us and those we intend to visit virtually with.

Whether it is calling a neighbor to say hello, video chatting with a family member, or finding other means of staying connected with friends from afar we need to show we care. Doing so is not just important to those around us, but for our own health as well.

Benjamin Bucklin

Searsport

Take notes from Sen. Collins

I would like to thank Sen. Susan Collins for once again putting the people of Maine before politics to craft the Paycheck Protection Program, which provides relief for small employers and their valued staff.

During one of the most divisive and stressful times in recent history, Collins did what she does best — she brought stakeholders and members of both parties together to craft real solutions, and was even able to get unanimous support in the Senate. When we needed our elected officials the most, she delivered for the people of Knox County and our country.

This new law was crafted with the hospitality industry and small Main Street businesses in mind, all of which have been hit particularly hard, and are vitally important to coastal communities like ours. The funding provided by this new program can keep businesses and their employees afloat, so they can all weather this storm together.

Collins has been working with everyone to bring home results. I would urge everyone who is in office, and those seeking office, to take notes from her, and rise to this occasion. It’s what we need as a country to get through this pandemic together.

Gordon Page

Owls Head

 


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