September 17, 2019
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Bath man forced to kill wild fox after struggle

Stock photo | Pexels
Stock photo | Pexels

BATH, Maine — Norman Kenney said that his Friday seemed to be starting off in a normal way.

“I was walking in my backyard to get some tools from the shed,” Kenney, 87, said. “I got over here and I looked, and I see this animal coming down from that patch of grass.”

He said he couldn’t tell what the animal was at first.

“I could see then that maybe it was a small dog, but I know most of the dogs around the neighborhood, and I didn’t recognize it,” Kenney said. “Then I got over here and realized this is a Fox!”

He says that he made noises and motions to try and scare the fox away, and said he was surprised at how the fox reacted.

“I thought maybe it would turn and run away,” Kenney said. “Then it made a beeline for me, coming right at me.”

He said the fox attached itself to his left pant leg and shoe, and would not let go.

“I picked up my foot and shook it, and then I’d back up a little bit,” Kenney said.

The fox never broke Kenney’s skin with it’s bite, but Kenney said he was still shocked at how aggressive the fox was.

“I thought I got to kill this thing or it’s going to get me,” Kenney said.

He shared the picture below moments after he managed to kill the fox. He said that he kept his foot on the neck of the fox until Bath police arrived.

“I’ve never had one come at me like that before,” Kenney said.

Bath police officials said that they have had seven confirmed rabid attacks this year, and said they’re waiting on the test results for this attack.

“The body was taken to the lab in Augusta to be tested today,” Bath Deputy Chief Andrew Booth said. “We should know what happened by the end of the week.”

He said that anyone who comes across a wild animal should be cautious, regardless if they look like they’re rabid.

“Take those precautions, make sure your pets are vaccinated, report any suspicious animals, and if there is exposure, get medical help,” Booth said.

Kenney said he will continue to walk in his backyard and do his garden work, but said he will not be far from his very large walking stick.

“I guess the story is walk quietly and carry a big stick,” Kenney said.

For more information on what to do if you come in contact with a wild animal, click here.

 



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