September 19, 2019
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Maine peaches are perfect for this decadent dessert

Sandy Oliver | BDN
Sandy Oliver | BDN
Peach Cobbler

If a peach crisp and a peach cobbler got married, this dish would be their offspring.

Yes, you can grow peaches in Maine. Even if it isn’t Georgia, any ripe peach just off the tree is going to taste vastly better than any peach that has traveled from some distant parts to cool its heels in the produce department of some grocery store. Right now my trees are shedding peaches, two weeks late but, hey, am I ever glad to see them.

A batch of chutney is already in jars, we’ve had peaches with cream and a few canned slices are all put up in pints. I’m going to make a pie, for sure, and whirl up a peach smoothie or two. And I tried out this recipe that my friend Meg De Koslowski left with me last summer.

Meg’s Granny’s Cobbler combines a semi-batter topping with a crisp’s sweet crunch. She recommended making it in a 9-by-13 pan, which creates a thin layer of peach with the topping, but you could put it in a smaller one to end up with a slightly thicker layer of peaches and denser top. I used closer to six cups of sliced peaches than the required four cups.

Meg uses half white sugar, half brown. You can use all white, if you wish.

When you assemble the cobbler part, the result of mixing beaten egg into a sugar and flour mix creates a loose, crumble-like result for which I actually used my fingers to sprinkle over the top. Pouring melted butter over it all seemed a little counterintuitive. Was this going to be a big greasy mess? But the crumble rises with the baking powder in it, covers the peaches, and the sugar and butter bake together for a crunchy, sweet, almost cookie-like crust. Yum.

Sandy Oliver | BDN
Sandy Oliver | BDN
Peach Cobbler

Of course, I don’t feel the same semi-virtuous surge after eating this as I do when there is oatmeal and whole wheat flour involved in my usual fruit crisp topping. But I like it a lot better than the biscuit-like dough typical of many cobblers.

Meg’s Granny had a good idea here. Ice cream or whipped cream on top? Heck, why not both?

P.S. Last week I failed to say when to add the blueberries to the clafoutis. You can sprinkle them over the top of the batter before you put it into the oven, or you can stir them in. It will be fine either way.

Meg’s Granny’s Peach Cobbler

Makes 6 to 8 servings

4 to 6 cups of sliced, ripe peaches

Juice of half a lemon

½ cup white sugar

½ cup light brown sugar

1 cup flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ teaspoon cinnamon or more to taste

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

½ cup or one stick butter, melted

Vanilla ice cream or whipped cream, optional

1. Heat the oven to 375 degrees and lightly grease a 9×13 baking dish.

2. Distribute the peaches over the bottom of the dish, and sprinkle lemon juice over them.

3. Whisk together sugars, flour, baking powder and cinnamon.

4. Beat the egg with a fork and add the vanilla, and mix into the dry ingredients.

5. Mix until all the flour is taken up, rubbing it together if need be with your fingers or the back of a spoon.

6. Distribute the flour mixture evenly over the top of the peaches.

7. Spoon the melted butter over all.

8. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, until top is golden brown and the peaches are bubbling. Serve warm with or without ice cream or whipped cream.

 



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