PORTLAND, Maine — If you’re a Mainer going to the IRS for dating advice, the situation likely is bleak.

For instance, if you’re looking for a home where the single-filers roam, the IRS confirms perhaps what instinct would tell us — that peninsular Portland is the place.

In the city’s 04101 ZIP code, there was a full 2.6 single-filers for every person filing a joint return in 2013, the most recent year local individual income data were available.

[tableau server=”public.tableau.com” workbook=”Maine2013taxfigures” view=”Singlesmapandscatter?:showVizHome=no” tabs=”no” toolbar=”yes” revert=”” refresh=”” linktarget=”” width=”100%” height=”535px”][/tableau]

All those rows and schedules laboriously filled in or totaled from above do shed light on topics beyond the most obvious ones, such as where the highest earners in Maine call home (answer: Cumberland Foreside).

While that fact may not get your engine revving, it might be a welcome distraction from actually filing your taxes. (In case you’re wondering, the April 15 deadline was pushed to April 18 this year nationally and to April 19 in Maine and Massachusetts because of Patriots Day).

At the heart of that data, though, are the questions about who makes the most. The Tax Foundation in 2014 noted that IRS data don’t paint a complete picture of relative wealth from one area to another. Bottomline adjusted gross income includes various types of income, and the data don’t account for variations in the cost of living.

Those caveats in mind, the data do allow analysis of fairly small areas where income was most highly concentrated in 2013.

[tableau server=”public.tableau.com” workbook=”Maine2013taxfigures” view=”Wealthmapandscatter?:showVizHome=no” tabs=”no” toolbar=”yes” revert=”” refresh=”” linktarget=”” width=”100%” height=”535px”][/tableau]

In ZIP codes mostly in southern Maine but also Down East and in two areas of central Maine, tax filers taking in more than $200,000 accounted for more than a quarter of the reported gross income.

Accordingly, those areas of the state also had some of the highest levels of refund requests for overpayments per tax filing. But destinations north had some of the highest rates of refund requests, many areas with as high as 90 percent of tax filers claiming overpayments.

[tableau server=”public.tableau.com” workbook=”Maine2013taxfigures” view=”Repayments?:showVizHome=no” tabs=”no” toolbar=”yes” revert=”” refresh=”” linktarget=”” width=”100%” height=”535px”][/tableau]

For those areas near the top for income, those areas also were among those where income was least likely to be split in a substantial way. For every dependent claimed in Ogunquit, there were about seven tax returns.

That contrasts with the southern Aroostook County ZIP code 04780, including Smyrna, Dyer Brook, Hersey and Merrill, where there was about one dependent claimed for every return filed in 2013. In the Bangor area’s 04401, just more than two returns were filed for every dependent, perhaps signalling a focus on family values — or valued families.

[tableau server=”public.tableau.com” workbook=”Maine2013taxfigures” view=”Dependents?:showVizHome=no” tabs=”no” toolbar=”yes” revert=”” refresh=”” linktarget=”” width=”100%” height=”535px”][/tableau]

The data don’t include details on promptitude and circumstance of filings but do reveal a far northern aggression toward taxes this time of year.

ZIP codes including Madawaska, St. Agatha and Van Buren were the most likely in 2013 to shell out for someone else to do their taxes, with an estimated 80 percent of returns coming in with a paid preparer’s signature.

[tableau server=”public.tableau.com” workbook=”Maine2013taxfigures” view=”Paidpreparermap?:showVizHome=no” tabs=”no” toolbar=”yes” revert=”” refresh=”” linktarget=”” width=”100%” height=”535px”][/tableau]

Bangor, Portland and Lewiston ZIP codes were among some of the most fearless come tax time, with about 40 percent of returns coming in with a paid preparer’s signature in 2013. But the boldest towns by that measure were Randolph and Vienna, where about two-thirds of filings came in without the signature of a paid preparer.

The IRS rounds those totals of filings to the nearest 10, which has an outsize impact on percentages in smaller towns, many of which had the highest rates of hiring paid preparers.

Most of those areas weren’t far off from the national average, which was about 61 percent in 2013, while most of the state had a much lower share of people paying to have their taxes done.

So, if you’re feeling the pain or pressure of tackling taxes yourself on this deadline weekend, it’s likely that, in much of the state, you’re not alone.

Darren Fishell

Darren is a Portland-based reporter for the Bangor Daily News writing about the Maine economy and business. He's interested in putting economic data in context and finding the stories behind the numbers.