PORTLAND, Maine — The Maine Supreme Judicial Court on Tuesday unanimously upheld the conviction of a former Bangor-area disc jockey for possession of child pornography.

Dana Wilson, 65, of Brewer and Florida was sentenced in August 2014 at the Penobscot Judicial Center to 2½ years in prison with all but nine months suspended for possession of sexually explicit material. He also was sentenced to four years of probation.

Wilson has been free on bail pending the outcome of the appeal and living in Florida, according to a previously published report. He must report to the Penobscot County Jail to begin serving his sentence three days after his attorney, Jamesa Drake of Auburn, is informed of the court’s decision.

Efforts on Tuesday to reach Drake and Tracy Collins, assistant district attorney for Penobscot County, who handled the appeal, were unsuccessful.

Justices heard oral arguments in the case in September, when they convened at the Capital Judicial Center in Augusta.

Drake argued that Superior Court Justice Ann Murray misinterpreted the meaning of “possesses” in finding that he had possessed sexually explicit material, according to a previously published report.

“The court’s findings in this case demonstrate its understanding that, for Wilson to be found guilty, he had to have — in accordance with the plain meaning of ‘possess’ — held, owned or controlled the digital images in question,” Chief Justice Leigh I. Saufley wrote for the court. “The question becomes whether there is sufficient evidence that Wilson held, owned or controlled the images to support a conviction for possession of them.

“To establish Wilson’s intentional holding, ownership or control of prohibited material, the state offered both direct evidence that Wilson held on his computers in February 2011 two partial video files and [12] thumbnail images of sexually explicit images depicting children, and circumstantial evidence from forensic computer experts that Wilson had owned and viewed those images during the preceding two years using [file sharing service] FrostWire,” she said.

“Given the evidence presented at trial, and applying the plain meaning of the statute, the court’s findings are not clearly erroneous, and those facts support the court’s ultimate finding of guilt beyond a reasonable doubt,” Saufley concluded.

The case that led to the charges against Wilson began when Brewer police Sgt. Jay Munson went to Wilson’s home on Feb. 14, 2011, after learning from the group Internet Crimes Against Children that someone with an IP address at the home where Wilson lived had received a video known to portray child pornography, according to testimony at his jury-waived trial in June 2014.