WASHINGTON — Here’s a look at how area members of Congress voted over the previous week.

Along with roll call votes this week, the House also passed the following measures by voice vote. It passed a resolution expressing concern over anti-Israel and anti-Semitic incitement within the Palestinian Authority, and it passed the Global Anti-Poaching Act, to support global anti-poaching efforts and strengthen the capacity of partner countries to counter wildlife trafficking.

House votes

House vote 1

ANTI-SEMITISM IN EUROPE: The House has passed a resolution, sponsored by Rep. Christopher H. Smith, R-New Jersey. The resolution expressed the sense of the House that the U.S. government should work with European nations and the European Union on programs to prevent anti-Jewish violence in Europe.

Smith said the measures called for in the resolution were “essential to keep European Jewish communities safe and secure.”

The vote was unanimous with 418 yeas. Both Reps. Chellie Pingree, D-1st District, and Bruce Poliquin, R-2nd District, were among the yeas.

House vote 2

TRANSPORTATION AND TOURISM: The House has passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Corrine Brown, D-Florida, to the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform Act. The amendment would establish a National Advisory Committee on Travel and Tourism Infrastructure to advise the Transportation Department on ways to use intermodal transportation to promote travel and tourism.

Brown said the committee held the promise of improving ways to transport tourists and ways to evacuate tourists in the event of natural or manmade disasters.

An amendment opponent, Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pennsylvania, said the underlying bill already addressed the issue, making the committee redundant.

The vote was 216 yeas to 207 nays. Both Pingree and Poliquin were among the yeas.

House vote 3

STATE TRANSPORTATION SPENDING: The House has rejected an amendment sponsored by Rep. Ron DeSantis, R-Florida, to the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform Act. The amendment would have directed the Transportation Department to give state governments greater authority to determine how to manage elements of surface transportation systems that are not interstate highways.

DeSantis said the states would be more responsive and more efficient than the federal government in meeting local transportation needs.

An amendment opponent, Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pennsylvania, said Congress should maintain federal authority to partner with states to coordinate the development of transportation solutions.

The vote was 118 yeas to 310 nays. Pingree gave a nay vote, and Poliquin gave a yea vote.

House vote 4

MILITARY SPENDING IN 2016: The House has passed the National Defense Authorization Act, sponsored by Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisconsin. The bill would authorize more than $600 billion of spending on military programs in fiscal 2016, including provisions to provide benefits for military members who serve for less than 20 years, greater protections for victims of sexual assault, and for funding the building of nine new Navy ships.

A bill supporter, Rep. Adam Smith, D-Washington, said it reformed key military programs, gave the Defense Department greater funding predictability and improved national security.

The vote was 370 yeas to 58 nays. Both Pingree and Poliquin were among the yeas.

House vote 5

INCENTIVES FOR NATURAL GAS VEHICLES: The House has passed an amendment sponsored by Rep. Markwayne Mullin, R-Oklahoma, to the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform Act. The amendment would require the Environmental Protection Agency to give the same regulatory incentives for manufacturing natural gas vehicles that the agency gives for manufacturing electric vehicles.

Mullin said the incentives would promote the making of vehicles that compete with traditionally fueled cars and trucks, bringing down costs for consumers.

An amendment opponent, Rep. Janice Schakowsky, D-Illinois, said natural gas and electric vehicles “are fundamentally different in terms of their tailpipe emissions and the miles per gallon they get on the road,” and the EPA should give preference to the more environmentally beneficial development of electric vehicles.

The vote was 246 yeas to 178 nays. Pingree gave a nay vote, and Poliquin gave a yea vote.

House vote 6

NEGOTIATING TRANSPORTATION BILL: The House has agreed to a motion sponsored by Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pennsylvania, to go to conference with the Senate to negotiate differences between the House and Senate-passed versions of the Surface Transportation Reauthorization and Reform Act (H.R. 22).

Shuster said the bill sought to reform transportation programs, making their planning and development efforts more efficient and thereby facilitating the flow of freight and commerce on highways and other transportation infrastructure.

The vote was 371 yeas to 54 nays. Both Pingree and Poliquin were among the yeas.

Senate votes

Senate vote 1

GOVERNMENT BUDGET AGREEMENT: The Senate has concurred in the House amendment to the Bipartisan Budget Act, sponsored by Rep. Harold Rogers, R-Kentucky. The bill would establish a federal government budget plan for fiscal years 2016 and 2017, suspend the debt limit through March 2017, revise budget spending caps for 2016 and 2017, and make various reforms to Social Security and Medicare.

A supporter, Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, said the bill would extend the solvency of the Social Security Disability Insurance program to 2022, prevent large rate increases for Medicare Part B enrollees and increase flexibility in government spending.

An opponent, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Kentucky, criticized the bill for derailing efforts to restrain government spending by breaking budget limits recently negotiated by Congress, and for giving the president unlimited borrowing authority.

The vote was 64 yeas to 35 nays. Both Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Angus King, I-Maine, were among the yeas.

Senate vote 2

REGULATING WATERWAYS: The Senate has rejected a cloture motion to end debate on the motion to consider the Federal Water Quality Protection Act, sponsored by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyoming. The bill would require the Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers to follow specific guidelines in revising the definition of the term “waters of the United States” for regulatory purposes.

Barrasso said the government’s initial proposed term would over-regulate isolated and temporary bodies of water, hurting farmers and many other groups by making their activities subject to arbitrary regulation.

A bill opponent, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Maryland, said the initial proposal “restores historic coverage of the Clean Water Act for streams and wetlands that provide drinking water for one-third of Americans.”

The vote was 57 yeas to 41 nays, with a three-fifths majority required to end debate. Collins gave a yea vote, and King gave a nay vote.

Senate vote 3

DISAPPROVING OF WATERWAYS RULE: The Senate has passed a resolution, sponsored by Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, stating congressional disapproval of the Army Corps of Engineers and Environmental Protection Agency rule defining “waters of the United States” and voiding the rule.

Ernst said the rule had dubious legal standing, and its restrictions on what farmers, manufacturers and small businesses can do with waterways on their land would impose “excessive permitting requirements that will delay future projects and conservation efforts.”

A resolution opponent, Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin, D-Maryland, said the rule would clarify water regulation under the Clean Water Act, establishing regulatory certainty, and that blocking the rule would compromise drinking water supplies for about 117 million Americans.

The vote was 53 yeas to 44 nays. Both Collins and King were among the nays.

Senate vote 4

DEBATING MILITARY SPENDING BILL: The Senate has rejected a cloture motion to end debate on the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, sponsored by Rep. Rodney Frelinghuysen, R-New Jersey, which would fund the Defense Department’s military activities in fiscal 2016.

A supporter of ending debate, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, said the bill provided vital military funding “at a time of serious and growing threats to our own national security and at a time of troubling instability and violent conflicts in many countries.”

An opponent of ending debate, Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Illinois, said delaying a vote on the bill would give the Senate the opportunity to complete the work of implementing the budget plan recently approved by Congress.

The vote was 51 yeas to 44 nays, with a three-fifths majority required to end debate. Collins gave a yea vote, and King gave a nay vote.

Senate vote 5

FUNDING THE VA AND MILITARY CONSTRUCTION: The Senate has passed a motion to consider the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, sponsored by Rep. Charles W. Dent, R-Pennsylvania. The bill would provide fiscal 2016 funding for the Defense Department’s military construction and housing programs, as well as the Veterans Affairs Department.

A bill supporter, Sen. Jon Tester, D-Montana, said adequately funding the VA would fulfill Congress’ obligation “to honor our commitment we made to the veterans of this country” in return for their sacrifice.

The vote was unanimous with 93 yeas. Both Collins and King were among the yeas.