January 19, 2020
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Comments for: Vietnam deal sparks running battle between New Balance in Maine, Nike

  • Anonymous

    Eliminate the tariff. But eliminate the tax write off for advertisment expenses that Nike gets. Nike doesn’t manufacture one item in their line of products in the US. Therefore they should not be considered a US manufacturer. Let them move their corporate headquarters to Vietnam, Indonesia, China, India or wherever else they make their products.

  • Anonymous

    I heard a great line in a movie the other night. “Your clothes have the stench of the sweat of third world labor”. No matter how many times you wash them, the stench is still there.

  • Anonymous

    And people wonder why there are no more manufacturing jobs in this country any more. Who in this country can afford to live on $150 to $200 a month? Sounds to me like it’s time to boycott NIKE. I’ll never buy anything sold by them again!!

  • PabMainer

    The foundational issue isn’t the tariffs but the fact that 99% of the sports shoes sold in the USA are imported….and people continue to wonder why we have no jobs and a financial cliff hanging around…..Crazy…..

  • Matt Sparrow

    New Balance does $1.8 billion in sales, not $204 billion.
    New Balance does not “make” shoes in Maine. The company assembles shoes made for parts produced in China.
    The Nike shoe is Dual Fusion, not “Deep Fusion”.
    Any fact checkers at BDN?

    • Anonymous

      Thanks, Matt. I was going to question that “$204 billion” figure myself. I confess I like the BDN, but they do seem short on copy editors and fact checkers.

    • Anonymous

      Actually, many of their sneakers are, in fact, made in the USA of American materials.

      http://www.newbalance.com/Domestic-Manufacturing/about_domestic_manufacturing,default,pg.html

      • Matt Sparrow

        Sorry–that statement is false

        • Anonymous

          No, that statement is not false. When a footwear company labels a product “Made in USA”, their product must be assembled in this country and made of at least 70% American materials; the company can be sued if the information is incorrect. New Balance sells many sneakers labeled “Made in USA”, which can be verified on their website.

  • Anonymous

    They are worried about Vietnams economy. Not Americas as clearly stated above.. What exactly do they think we are going to sell to them?
    The whole story reeks of greed.

    • Anonymous

      The American businessmen take very good care of their Communist friends while crying unions are Socialist!

      • Anonymous

        I laugh every time I think about that! lol. For years, big business tried to demonize unions by calling them communists. Now, the same businesses embrace cheap COMMUNIST Chinese labor and still try to blame the commie unions here in America. Those commie unions, they forced us to do business with COMMUNIST China! lol. Which is it big corporate America? Is communism good or bad this week?

        • Anonymous

          I think the reason big businesses don’t like unions is because they can leverage higher wages for their constituents. This makes it very difficult to compete with countries whose labor prices are absurdly low. If you can make something in china for 25 dollars including freight and tariffs and it costs 30 dollars to make it in America because of labor costs or whatever, well I would think CEOs would be remiss to their shareholders if they didn’t employ the cheap communist labor.

          • FrankC

            I believe the cost differential is greater than 5 bucks a unit.. I actually consulted at a division of a national firm who ‘brought’ back from the far east the manufacturing of one of their products mainly because of quality issues. It was a high volume automated manufactured product.

          • Anonymous

            Yes, I would hope that if quality is not up to specifications the manufacturer would lose their manufacturing privileges.

          • Anonymous

            More importantly, if quality isn’t up to snuff, they should lose sales.

          • Anonymous

            Um, I wonder if they employed workers here to make their products, wouldn’t that greatly reduce the unemployment rate? Thus saving the American tax payers a lot of money?
            Oh foolish me. The Corporate interests don’t give a large rat’s rectum. They own congress and have the laws written so that their taxes are next to nothing anyway. Gotta love them loopholes.

    • Anonymous

      They are not worried about Vietnams, Chinas, Cambodias, Indonesias, or any other countries economy. They are only interested in ‘Corproate’ profitability.

  • Ansel Hazen

    So what got said here? Under another President he might not be told to care?

    “Under this president, it’s my job to care about those [New Balance]
    jobs and see if we can strike the balance. Those 1,300 jobs may not be
    much in a big city with 5 million people, but in a state like Maine,
    that’s a big deal,” he said.”

  • Anonymous

    Great opportunity to export more American jobs. Not a great deal for American workers, but at least they will be able to buy cheap t-shirts.

  • Anonymous

    Eliminate the tariff?! No, INCREASE the tariff! Any company that wants to keep it’s production facilities offshore should be taxed at a higher rate than companies that provide jobs here in the U.S. That being said, the salaries that would have to be paid here would inevitably increase the price substantially. I can easily live without the ridiculously over priced sneakers, but apparently many can’t.

    • Anonymous

      We need more common sense like this. Come on everybody wake up. Our elected leaders need to wake up and put America first.

  • Anonymous

    It’s all about the mighty dollar, bottom line is always money. I couldn’t imagine making only 150-200 a month, that is crazy. I wonder if that number is for US dollars though, because I’ve been overseas and our currency can go a long way for certain parts of the world. For them it could be great pay, all in the perspective I suppose, but I’ve been getting my shoes from the New Balance factory for pretty much my whole life and will continue to do so for as long as I can.

    • Anonymous

      I’m sure it stretches much further than here, but hundreds of millions of shoe sales a year and it only takes selling like 4-5 pairs to pay for the people who actually make the shoes for a month? New Balance seems like a much better approach.

      • Anonymous

        And yet Nike could afford to pay Mike Jordan, Tiger Woods $40 million a year to endorse their products. Of course it’s actually the American Tax Payer who foots that bill because Nike gets to write that money off as a business expense.

  • Anonymous

    200 dollars a month is exactly why they need more tariffs.

  • Anonymous

    “Profitability is a wonderful thing, but it’s not always our No. 1 motivator,” LeBretton said. “When everybody else made the decision to move overseas, we redoubled our efforts at home.”

    Sounds like a good and smart guy. Can’t believe some of these corps that have absolutely no loyalty or sense of appreciation to the country, but then still expect us to buy their products.

    • Sherman2

      Who on earth didn’t like this comment and why!? Anyone who puts a negative on a comment should be made to comment on why!

  • anonme 527

    cue Mr. Michaud

    • Anonymous

      He campaigned on this! Time to pay back.

  • Anonymous

    Dont buy them…buy AMERICAN made….I have started reading labels to see where items are made. Most of the time, the American made items are about the same price ( sometimes less) and I know that a fellow American has a job making the item! I have actually seen sweatshirts at a well known hunting store in Saco selling womens sweat shirts with the stores name on the front for about $30…made in China. They want my money, they had better start having the stuff made in the USA. I can survive just fine without a wearing an ad for their store, made in china, 30 dollar sweat shirt!

  • Anonymous

    Back in the late 70s, I had the pleasure of working with an ex-marine who had fought through in islandsof the South Pacific including IwoJima. When we started getting blueprints to make parts for the Jap die cast machines the company had bought, this man said,”30 years ago they paid me to kill the bast**rds and now they want me to crawl in bed with them! He quit.

  • test_name

    “First of all, it will enable Vietnam to achieve its own goals for transforming its economy”

    …How about transforming our economy back to a manufacturing economy?

    Look at any old mill town south of Boston – wealth used to overflow. Now, everything is gone. Obviously, free-trade does not work for the middle class worker.

    As a engineer in a metal stamping factory, this article appalls me.

    I vote for heavy tariffs on all imported products.

  • Anonymous

    Let us see what President Obama admin does, really.

    • Anonymous

      I can save you the suspense. Follow the money.

    • Anonymous

      More importantly, what will Congress do? They are the writers of tax policy.

  • Anonymous

    If the whopping $3 cost of the tarriff is pushed onto the consumer and they can still pull the profit they are pulling, I agree with LeBretton, they don’t need the tarriff removed. Why not increase the tarriff? Vietnam being a consumer, well, they will be the only ones who can afford shoes soon, they better become a consumer if these companies and others are to last, but as stated who in the United States can live off of $200 a month let alone $150. They won’t be buying $100 shoes.

    Also, where is the military going to get trusted running shoes?

    On the other hand, if they improved their economy to where they needed to make the kind of money Americans need to make to survive we would all be on that level playing field. Then what would these businesses running away from problems do?

    Are shoe companies also in Vietnam to be near rubber trees like paper manufacturers were once in the woods of Maine to be near the trees that make paper, which they can now primarily get from recycling?

    Isn’t that part of the interest of Vietnam like Afghanistan has minerals for electronic devices?

  • Anonymous

    We had an all American Christmas this year. Bought everything online months in advance. No feeling like it. Not one thin dime sent to China and not a plug nickel given to WalMart, Sears, KMart, Target, or any other cheap Chinese crap peddlers. They were just on the news whining about lower profits this holiday season. I like knowing I had a small part in that.

    • Anonymous

      We did, too. Excellent job!

      • Anonymous

        Right back at you! It feels great to be part of the solution instead of being part of the problem, doesn’t it? I would rather go bare foot than wear sweat shop shoes. It’s a principle thing I have never been able to shake.

        • Anonymous

          Wholeheartedly agree! It’s a challenge to buy only American-made footwear and clothing, but it’s sure a sacrifice I’m willing to make for American workers. Keep up the good work, buddy!

  • Anonymous

    I said it before, I will say it again, if we do not protect our jobs, we are finished as a Nation, we must produce, create wealth, not retread welfare, Senator Collins will give this away, and then stage a news break on how mad she is about it.

    • Anonymous

      When you buy Chinese made products, you create jobs in China. When you buy American made products, you create jobs here in America. Whose employment rate are you concerned about? I worry about the employment rate here in America, not the People’s Republic of China.

      • Anonymous

        That is not necessarily true. When you buy something made in china you are consuming a good that has already been manufactured. The job is done. The reason American companies hire outsourced labor is because they are hoping their future profit margins will be greater using a cheaper labor supply in the present. I applaud buying made in USA products only, but these American companies are simply trying to return more profits to their individual shareholders, many of which are Americans.

    • Anonymous

      Look, I said our, I am an american, do you need any more explaination??

  • Anonymous

    The only reason that they ( overseas workers)
    are so successful is that we are buying their products.
    I am as guilty as anybody but the fact is imports are cheaper. What to do about it? Simple. Tax imports to level the playing field. When it becomes more expensive to buy imports then we will buy home grown. New Balance has two lines. One made in America and the other overseas. The way that I see it is , they are trying to hang on , but need to cover their butts in case we continue to buy the imports.

  • Anonymous

    Boycott Nike and increase tariff!

  • Anonymous

    Why are we trying to protect Nike and Vietames employees? I’ll bet money that Viet Nam subsidizes their factories already giving them an unfair advantage over American companies..

  • Anonymous

    Thank god R$Money was not elected… EVERY Mfg. Job would be outsourced…!!!

  • Anonymous

    The fooishness and utter horror of war…58,000 Americans dead…2,000,000 Vietnamese killed and now have the shoe war….In 40 years the US will be competing with Iraq and ‘Afghanistan…Does this all make sense..

  • Anonymous

    best advice is to call your 2 US Senators and your Congressman/woman and tell them how you feel…I wrote mine last Aug

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