December 18, 2017
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Comments for: Quimby buys 8,315 acres, including ‘impressive’ snowmobile trail

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  • Anonymous

    Thanks Roxanne!

    • Anonymous

      Ya, Thanks for nothing…

      • Anonymous

        Thanks for 14.3 miles of new trails for me to ride on. That is SOMETHING!

        • Anonymous

          They are not ” new trails”
          She just purchased more land that had the trails on them already.

    • Anonymous

      Thanks for what? Telling people if they don’t support her plans she will post her land. Let her post her land and keep it all to herself and pay the taxes.

      • Anonymous

        The NERVE of her wanting some control over HER property, Tell you whiners what, bring your family and throw a picnic blanket on my front lawn and see what happens.

        • Anonymous

          let her pay the true taxes on it then

          • Anonymous

            While Bruce Poliquin gets a big tax break for his coastal property? No public access allowed there.

          • Anonymous

            Which of her properties is she arrears on taxes?
            Get back to me on that one, huh?

          • Anonymous

            Its called Tree Growth Tax Break, my sister gets that tax break on her land, look up the law yourself.

          • Anonymous

            “Close off the property and loose (sic) the tax break”

            So, your sister lets people traipse all over her land? Splendid, tell me exactly where it is and I will load the 4-wheelers and the grand kids.

        • Anonymous

          We agree, she can keep it all to herself. Just pay the taxes.

          • Anonymous

            I see. So which of her properties is she arrears on taxes?
            Please be specific now, you aren’t just flapping are you? Get back to me on that one, huh?

          • Anonymous

            Close off the property and loose the tax break

        • Anonymous

          her front lawn is getting a little big don’t ya think? Not a very good comparison.

        • Anonymous

          Yeah I don’t get it at all. She bought it. Its her land. She can do whatever she wants (legally).

          I’d love to watch someone tell some of these whiners what to do with _their_ land.

          Oh yeah…one can’t really own an apartment. Oops.

  • FrankC

    Does anyone have a link to a map which shows where this is?

  • Andre Linoge

    and i care – why? NO PARK, go home quimbo

    • Anonymous

      Probably because you ride illegally on other people’s property right? Loser.

      • Andre Linoge

        I don’t even own a snowmobile…or a 4wheeler anymore…wah wah

    • Cecil Gray

      Ditto Andro.

  • Anonymous

    Percival Baxter approves.

    • Anonymous

      not likely, read his papers

    • Anonymous

      Baxter was opposed to a National Park in Northern Maine, look it up.

      • County Escapee

        Is that why its not Baxter National Park?

    • Anonymous

      No he wouldn’t. He respected the people in the region and the state. She has called them fat and lazy and dumb. He wouldn’t approve at all.

  • Anonymous

    Frankly I just don’t care what she does with her land.

    Close it, open it – cut it all down – really I don’t care.

    But don’t keep buying it and expecting the taxpayers to pay for the maintenance and towns to give you tax breaks.

    • Anonymous

      Do you think that the communities might benefit in some way? Tourism, etc?

      • Anonymous

        Do you know how much it takes to fund a National Park for a year?

        Exactly how many moose trinkets is that gonna take…

        • Anonymous

          And how many moose trinkets will it take to make up for the loss in property tax revenue?

          • Anonymous

            Some non profits opt to pay town taxes because they do not want to hurt them financially. Are you so sure that Roxanne doesn’t? I have a feeling that she is too smart not to.

          • Anonymous

            I don’t know, but I would be interested to know. I do know that no one will be paying taxes on it if it becomes a federal preserve.

          • Anonymous

            She could still opt to pay property taxes as a gesture of good will or set up another type of financial trust to insure that revenue is not lost. I dimly recall something like that in her proposal but am not sure. I was a board member of a non profit and we decided that even though we could be exempt, we paid the tax on the amount of land that we owned as a good will gesture and because we realized that the town would be hurt by not doing so. Even so there were some who falsely accused us of not paying because they harbored the same resentments that are harbored against Roxanne who is doing something that she feels in the long run will be beneficial to the land and to the public.

      • Anonymous

        Nice gift from Roxanne.
        Pray for snow!

      • Anonymous

        Right because in recent history that area has been so accommodating to growth and expansion.

      • Michael Spaulding

        not in the long run, it will cost them in taxes since the community budget is divided amongst the taxpayers and if the land becomes public it will not be taxed so the community residents will have to pick up the slack.

  • David Douglas

    Give ’em trails, gate the trails ……it doesn’t seem to make much difference when it comes to R.Q. …….. perhaps it’s just because she’s a woman.

    • Anonymous

      Being a woman has nothing to do with it. Greed may have.

      • Anonymous

        You do mean ‘assumed’ greed, don’t you? I knew Roxanne back in the day. She was a kind gal then and I’m betting she still is. You’ve got nothing going for you but your prejudism and a computer to show it off on.

        • Anonymous

          If she was so “kind” why did she move her company and take the jobs away? And now she wants to come back here and have a park named after her.

          • Anonymous

            She moved her company, because North Carolina, would give her the tax breaks she needed. If Guildford had worked with her, she’d still be here. Shame on her for wanting to be successful.

          • Anonymous

            If you want to know how “kind” she is talk to some of the people who have worked for her. Find the guys who did the work for her in Winter Harbor. They can tell you stories.

            She can’t be trusted

          • Anonymous

            She is obviously an astute business woman. She moved out of state so she could make more money. Now she is giving back to the state but you obviously refuse to see that.

            She wants to have a park named after her? Is that why she is donating thousands of acres to the state? How do you know this? Have you spoken with her or is your prejudice based on how you view your own personal donating? You donate to further your personal image? No? I see no other reason why you would assume this about another person.

        • Anonymous

          I never assume anything. I know what that does to a person.

        • Anonymous

          So nice it was written twice.

    • Anonymous

      Your comment makes sense, considering it came from- a man.

  • She is a woman of greed. The woods of Northern Maine are nothing more to Roxanne than a Monopoly board and she wants it all. The woods are nothing like the “old days” and for future generations to see that will be nearly impossible after she puts up all her fancy yellow gates and posts all of “her” property. Go buy a country in South America to govern and leave our woods alone!

    • The good old days saw millions off acres controlled by timber companies who had no interested in what anyone of us thought and bought the State legislature hook, line, and sinker. I’m fascinated that it was ok for them to do whatever they wanted but Quimby, a private landowner too, cannot do what she wants.

      • Anonymous

        But that’s different! (isn’t it always for the hypocrites?)

      • Anonymous

        Timber companies came with thousands of jobs. They used a renewable resource that is still there today. Keep northern Maine a working forest. We have Baxter State Park. The people of Maine don’t need a Fed. Park right beside it.

        • Anonymous

          Notice that you are referring to the jobs of the timber companies in the past tense. Now those towns that relied on this, rely on unemployment checks and Mainecare. A park would be a way to reduce their reliance on the rest of us for subsistence.

          • Anonymous

            Let’s see how that works, loose the land tax, use taxes to pay for the maintenance now, and hire ranger for the park, so where is the money coming from now. The country is already broke. show us the math on that please.

          • Anonymous

            What on earth is it going to offer that Baxter already doesn’t? Build it and they won’t necesarilly come.

          • Cecil Gray

            It would sure be a step in moving forward to a real consortium of positive possibilities.

          • sassyfrazz

            I found this for Acadia National Park: The pay is good, but note that they are all temporary jobs. A few of them say that they can be terminated at anytime due to funding. I suppose one can say that logging is temporary depending on funding too, but I think the taxes they pay and the other businesses they rely on for their equipment maintenance, etc. probably generates more revenue than a relative handful of temporary service jobs do.

            As an aside, there are many, many, people working in service sector jobs like the ones a national park bring. A vast majority are on MaineCare and qualify for food stamps because contrary to what seems to be popular belief, a LOT of people on MaineCare actually work at least part-time, and often more than one part-time service job.

            I don’t see it as helping people on subsistence at all. Still, I suppose it’s better than nothing; however, believing that is what I think has brought this state to the relative ‘zip for jobs that one can live on’ place that it now.
            https://www.usajobs.gov/JobSearch/Search/GetLocationResults?keyword=Any%20&latitude=44.3492088317871&longitude=-68.2542343139648&location=Acadia%20National%20Park%2C%20ME&statusFilter=public

          • Anonymous

            A national park, which would probably only offer seasonal work, would not provide much if any real jobs in the area, nothing that would make a dent on the entitlement checks mailed out from Augusta or DC.

      • Cecil Gray

        Home Run!!!! I remember arguing about the Jonathan Carters clear cut bill at a local store one day. I did not really favor the plan though the concept was right. One guy, who was a Carter hater, was bellowing about how he did not want people from away dictating how the Maine woods was managed. I guess he did not understand that the boardroom dictating those woods was in St.Louis at the time.

    • Anonymous

      You’ve completely forgotten about John Malone. He bought a million acres in Western Maine where you can’t even get to it and his PR campaign says he’ll keep the land “traditional”. So all of the nostalgic hunter breakfast eaters emoted over St. John Malone. But no one bothered to ask what he meant by “traditional”. No one. “our woods”? OUR??

    • Cecil Gray

      Greed is what stripped the deer yards.

  • Anonymous

    This is outstanding. It’s so nice to see Ms. Quimby moving forward with her plan despite the negativity of a relatively small part of the State population. This park will come one day – and that’s a wonderful thing – both for the preservation aspect and for the economics.

    • Anonymous

      You my dear have lost all credibility after admitting to pouring your grease down the drain. Don’t you dare pretend you care about preservation. You are as phony as they come.

      • Anonymous

        Hear hear.

      • Anonymous

        Says the guy who drives an 8 cylinder extended cab.

        • Your point being ?

        • Anonymous

          Imagine that, someone chooses to drive a 4 wheel drive vehicle in a state that has the potential for winter weather 4-5 months out of the year.

      • Anonymous

        Grease down the drain?!? *GASP*

      • Cecil Gray

        The grease is over at the old mill. It sits in the empty tank known as take the money and run while investing zip in modernization. Cut and run!!

    • Anonymous

      What economics? No one is gonna travel up there to camp in the millions, we already have plenty of camp sites in this area now, where are the millions, look up how much ATVing/snowmobiling alone brings in for economics, and she opposes both.

  • Anonymous

    Good for you Roxanne. Buy as much as you can and keep the wood butchers from stripping the land. Bless you for your efforts.

    • Anonymous

      Remember your comment about “wood butchers” when you are wiping your behind with a piece of plastic.

      • Cecil Gray

        You remember it when the last whitetail starves in a two tree deer yard.

        • Anonymous

          First off, my reply was not directed to you. But seeing as you have entered the fray. There are protocols, law and policies in place by the State of Maine that dictate how, where and how much wood can be harvested on any given piece of land. If a landowner chooses to have their property, that they own harvested of wood and it is done within the parameters of those laws and policies than that is their right. If Roxanne Quimby chooses to purchase land and do what she sees fit with it that is equally as fine. I do not think that labeling someone as a “wood butcher” is fair, as that person is trying to earn an honest living while providing a product that the vast majority need.

          • Cecil Gray

            The wood butcher sits in an out of state wall street boardroom. The meat cutter cuts the bacon. I hear you; the soldier follows orders.

        • Anonymous

          Really? Take a little trip to Northern or Western Maine and tell me what you see. Climb on top of one of the mountains and look in all directions and tell me what you will see. I will give you a hint, they are tall, green in the spring/summer, and all sorts of colors in the fall. You guessed it, trees…as far as you can see in all directions.

          Every single year I get to hunt in the western Maine woods near the Maine/NH/Canadian border. I’ve climbed to the top of many mountains in the area where I am deep within paper company owned woods and guess what I see? Trees. Sure, as one would expect to see in wood company land, there are sections that have been cut recently, but the vast majority of what I see in all directions, which by the way is all owned by various paper companies, are trees. Plots of young trees where they had cut a few years back, older growth where they planted 10+ years ago, and some much larger, older trees. Sustainable wood cutting, which is what is happening here in Maine, is not contributing to the decline of the deer population. I see deer, moose, and many other forms of wildlife in these ‘wood butcher’ owned forests. I also see a lot of coyotes. I know they aren’t the only reason for the decline, but they absolutely are a much more significant problem than foresting today will ever cause.

          And yes, you may be right that most of the paper/wood company owned land is actually owned by investment groups and the wood harvesting is contracted out, but so what? They are still employing Maine people to do the work and by being an investment group their best interest is to keep the money coming in, which would mean proper maintenance of their land to give them the best product possible. That means the old images you have in your head of slash and burn are not happening. See for yourself that your knowledge of timber harvesting is severely outdated. Its okay to cut down a tree–they grow back!

    • Anonymous

      Please. The timber industry is nothing that it was 100 years ago, and there are far less woods harvested today. You realize the ‘wood butchers’ are replanting trees as well, right? After all, wood and paper is a renewable resource…do you get that? Renewable! Why would any timber or paper company just strip the land when they could replant after they cut down the trees in an area and come back in a number of years and cut again? Not to mention the fact that while much of the timber land is owned by private companies, they typically do allow it open to the general public for hunting, fishing, and snowmobiling. Seems like we all win. If we just left all these trees to overgrow and die, what do we really gain from that? Trees are a renewable resource and nobody should feel ashamed or be demonized for cutting them down to build, make paper, and keep their homes warm in the winter.

      I do not want northern Maine to become a national park. Its not needed and after she so ‘kindly’ hands over her giant tax deduction to ‘the people’, we get the burden of funding it. Not to mention the fact that Acadia is popular because there is so much to offer in such a small area. You can go on a day hike and then enjoy a popover at the teahouse or ride into Bar Harbor and get an ice cream. There are camping areas, hotels, bed and breakfasts all over the place, and Ellsworth is only 15 minutes away which offers many of the amenities that one would need for an extended stay or if you forgot something. What does that part of Maine offer? Trees? Sure, there are small towns which may see a little growth, but in order to expand we would have to cut down the very trees you accuse people of being ‘wood butchers’ of. Not to mention the asinine leaps that will have to be made to build in the area thanks to NIMBY crybabies just like those holding up the housing development in the area. Imagine attempting to build hotels, campgrounds, and restaurants? Forget it! Leave it as it is. Allow sustainable tree harvesting, year-round camping, and access for hunting, fishing, ATVs, and snowmobiles. That would be a true gift to Mainers.

      • Anonymous

        Well said.

  • Anonymous

    Go Roxie! Make their heads explode……..LOL.

  • Anonymous

    If we had not had some Roxanne Quimby types in the past, we would not have Yellowstone, Yosemite, Glacier, and a dozen other beautiful National Parks to visit and enjoy the unique beauty of the wilderness. I cannot understand why anyone would oppose the creation of another National Park in Maine – especially one where the land is free, thanks to the generosity of Roxanne Quimby.

    • Anonymous

      Seems reasonable to me too.

    • Anonymous

      Now i got plenty of my own land an am glad of it, and she owns her land and can do what she wants as well, but I would just like to say that if you think the land she wants to turn into a park is comparable to yosemite or glacier, boy I got news for you. Its not even close to the nicest land in maine. Just saying. And to reply to the person below who mentioned the cost of running a nat. park. to that I say it would be no more than 1 tomamhawk missile per year,

      • Anonymous

        Lol, your math skills need work.

        • Anonymous

          Really, the math isn’t all that far off. The national park service has an annual budget of about 2.5 billion, which works out to an average of 6.5 million for each of the the nearly 400 units under their control (of course, some cost much more and some much less). In contrast, one tomahawk cruise missile costs roughly between .5 and 1.5 million dollars depending on the specific model, so one park (on average) costs about four and a half tomahawks per year. All in all, however, the total U.S. arsenal of tomahawk missiles is worth slightly more than the entire annual cost of the national park system.

    • There is no such thing as a free lunch and you know it. The ‘donation’s monetary value alone is almost staggering in it’s corporate tax write-off value. Add to that the fact that, and we can all see it coming, Roxy’s sure to get a memorial out of this and now we have a legacy issue. We’ve all seen the legacy issue before with the E-W Highway and Cianbro. Now we are expected to swallow it again, this time under the guise of a National Park ? How many times does one have to shoot themselves in the foot before one realizes that it might not be the bet, or smartest, thing to do for the long term ? Maine’s not looking for another Park, the Fed’s aren’t looking for another Park. So why is Roxy so driven to get this Park done ? That’s the real question and it’s one that had better get answered before this goes any further.

      • Cecil Gray

        Tell me, how many holes do you have in your foot???

        • When one serves in the Infantry one learns about sight picture and making sure you have you weapon pointed down range.

          • Cecil Gray

            Your foot of ideas for Millinocket.

      • Anonymous

        For her narssistic ego.

    • Anonymous

      The Rockefellers, and their cohorts who were critical to the creation of those parks are nothing like Roxanne Quimby, sorry.

    • Anonymous

      agreed! We have an example right here in Maine already. Acadia National Park was created out of private land donated to the National Park Service (unlike many western parks, which were carved out of federal land). George Dorr and John D. Rockefeller Jr are heroes.

      • Anonymous

        Acadia was a great gift to the American people. No doubt about it. Acadia would today be dotted with million dollar mansions and its beauty off limits to everyday folks. We have a camp with a beautiful view of Mt. Katahdin on South twin lake. Quimby can buy all the land she wants. I just can’t figure out why she is. That land will be there forever, in my opinion. I don’t see a future that involves mass development of the North woods…ever. Anyone who thinks it will be a great tourist destination is not thinking logically about what types of trips families are looking for. I see families at Acadia with bored kids. Teens looking depressed and like they want to be anywhere but in that park. In today’s world they need to be entertained by something other than a view. What are the numbers for Baxter State Park?

      • Anonymous

        You do realize who J.D. Rockerfeller was? He was the the world’s first billionaire, and he controlled both the production and distribution of a large part of the oil/gas at the turn of the last century (Standard Oil-think Exxon). I’ve read about the founding of Acadia NP. I don’t think that the formation of it was altogether altruistic. Categorizing Rockerfeller as a ‘hero’ is probably a little strong.

    • Anonymous

      The “Qumbys of the past” were making parks because there were no parks, and those people were also avid outdoors people who were hunters, fishers, boaters, and photographers who wanted the most people possible to come to the parks. What Quimby is doing is shutting out most outdoors enthusiasts since they can’t go where they can’t drive. Opposition to a National Park is based on the experience of watching the tangled federal bureaucracies mismanage other parks in the past and not wanting their influence in northern Maine.

      • Cecil Gray

        So the private investments groups are presently managing land appropriately????

        • Anonymous

          I really don’t care how much land Quimby owns as long as she is paying a fair tax on the value. I have 8/10th of an acre and it is valued at $10,000 for tax purposes. What is her tax value?

    • Anonymous

      Once all that land becomes a National Park, we will be paying for it. It’s off the tax rolls and I question the value of this land as a National Park. Unless you can find a lot of tourists who want to go camping from October to March in the North Woods of Maine…lol. I don’t think you can compare the land Quimby is acquiring to Yosemite or even Acadia.

      • Anonymous

        Ya – I am just not seeing the value this land brings to the table.

        The people interested in hiking and camping already come.
        Baxter State park is the end (or start) of the Appalachian trail.
        People think that just because a national park is built the area is just going to automatically flourish.

        I just don’t see it happening.

      • Cecil Gray

        If it is not so good then why do the whiners who cry for access bleat so much about it being acquired by Quimby and over time becoming a treasure to visit?

        • Anonymous

          Are you from Maine? Do you know what “traditional use” of Maine lands means? Let me explain it for you: hunting, skiing, snowmobiling, fishing. She limits access to her property.

          • Cecil Gray

            “Traditional” use in your neck of the woods means using land, regardless of who owns it, for those activities as if it was a right. The “key tradition” is that the paper companies of the past, and so far most of the conglomerates, use access as a olive branch then they cut and run. Cutting and running is running out cutting places. Private land owners have different visions. Personally I like the access but I also favor people who treat land in Maine as a treasure and will allow me to enter said land as a treasure. Ms. Quimby is a treasure finder. Maine needs to cater to commercial interests as well as those who see treasure in land, not only in the harvest of wood, but in the reclamation of harvested land as well.

          • Anonymous

            Yes lets hug every tree and kiss every pine cone in the name of preservation!

          • Cecil Gray

            Nice dodge Cletus.

          • Anonymous

            She will eventually block access. She always does. She wants a National Park. No No No. She has even admitted she does not know what a working forest is. She has admitted that she knows nothing about taking acre of the woods other than a Thoreau interpretation. She is not what Maine needs.

    • Anonymous

      Not to mention state parks like Baxter which faced the same kind of negative response. I think Roxanne will be viewed as a hero (heroine) in the future.

    • If Rox pays for maintenance, personell and admission, it will be “free”. Otherwise, subsidization will be needed. IE – she’s shifting the cost from her private property, to you and me – the public.

      I can’t say I’d mind that much, given the tax burden would be minute, though it’s not something I’d be likely to be visiting anytime soon, if ever.

      She could conserve the land, keep it free from development, pay the taxes and let responsible Mainers use designated areas for recreation. If this privilege is abused, then shut it down. There, not too hard.

    • Liberal Soup N Crackers

      There was no Quimby type associated with the establishment of Yellowstone. Yosemite was stolen from the Ahwahneechee Indians.Glacier was established by purchasing the land from the Blackfeet Indians subject to the Blackfeet having perpetual hunting and fishing rights as well as full access to the land. That doesn’t sound like Quimby to me.

      • Anonymous

        I just knew you are smarter than Randall!

      • Cecil Gray

        Every park we own was taken from “Indians”. Different day same tired argument.

        • Liberal Soup N Crackers

          That is not true. Acadia was provided to ensure the exclusive environment of Bar Harbor remained for the very privileged. Different day, same ignorance from the progressives.

    • Liberal Soup N Crackers

      The most that could happen with that land is the establishment of a national forest. The land does not meet the criteria for a national park.

    • Anonymous

      Thanks Mr. Randall for your positive thoughts on the betterment of Maine and for it’s citizens. It’s a breath of fresh air….than to read of the whining over and over of others who love to tell other people who own land and pay taxes on it….what to do with it. If Roxanne Quimby wasn’t around they would find something else to whine about…there not happy unless they are whining….

    • HalseyTaylor

      Countless times I’ve been on logging roads here in Maine and thought how the beauty rivals that in Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Glacier Parks. Soon folks all over the world will be seeing the beautiful glory of T10-R7.

      • Anonymous

        Watch the gates go up on the logging roads. The Wilson stream road in Elliotsville is a prime example. Although ordered by the Piscataquis county commissioners months ago to remove the gate it still remains their just waiting for her to get the chance to slam it shut again.

        • Cecil Gray

          And I hope she does.

  • Anonymous

    I hope she blows every last cent he has on trying to build her park

    • Anonymous

      Why not?…..she’s got plenty of it to spend.

  • Bertha Gruntz

    LOL. Keep up the vitriol, folks. She has the money to do whatever she wants and after all the hate you have bestowed on her for taking away your free snowmobiling land, I hope she puts a big fence around the whole Millinocket area and charges tolls for every one of you just to get home.You folks are, sadly, not overly bright.

    • Anonymous

      You mean if we would just play kissy face with her she would be nice to us and let us on her property? Just like if we play kissy face with the Taliban they will love us.

      • Anonymous

        After all, it is your RIGHT to use her property.

  • Anonymous

    She’s squeezing you out Northern Maine.

  • Anonymous

    Ho, Ho, Ho: Let, it Snow, Let it Snow, Let it SNOW…!!!

  • Anonymous

    What is her take on ATV’s

  • she is up to no good,she has voiced her distaste for maine people more then once.so her motives are clear to buy all the land she can and keep maine people from using it or living on it.I would not doubt her motives are to drive as many natural maine folks out as possable.

  • Anonymous

    “The company also announced the opening of 14.3 miles of snowmobile trails on land it owns between Millinocket and Matagamon.”
    Are these new trails or the ones she’s allowed all along? It sounds like new trails, but I find that hard to believe.

  • Anonymous

    So, that is what Bigfoot looks like without the fur!

  • carl loeffler

    As a born and raised northern Mainer, keep it up Mrs. Quimby!

  • Lord Whiteman

    In northern Maine over 30% of all income comes from government checks but when someone comes along who wants to create job opportunities the wingnuts are against it.

  • Anonymous

    The taxes they are talking about is called “Tree Growth Tax Break” look it up, just because she buys more land and opens a trail that has been there for years eceryone is suppose to forget about her past remarks, and plans for Maine, she is just looking to make a name for herself so everyone looks to her like Mr. Baxter, the only thing in that area that people want to see is Mt. Katahdin, there is nothing else there to attract millions just because its called a federal park.

    • Anonymous

      What is wrong with wanting to be the next Percival Baxter? You say, “the only thing in that area that people want to see is Mt. Katahdin.” Poppycock! Try telling that to someone from Gary, Indiana who comes to Vacationland for a summer vacation. A new national park would generate interest all over the country, if not the world. Maine has always been a tourist state, and we know how to parlay such publicity into revenue. Half the naysayers are those who complain of no new business opportunities. And this opportunity, unlike Plum Creek and others, is not based on development, but preservation of our natural resources. It would be a win-win for the citizens of Maine. But there will always be a faction of selfish “me me” type individuals who believe the most important consideration is for their personal access and recreation. Why not frame the access and let the world enjoy the beauty of Maine?

  • Cecil Gray

    Build it Roxanne and they will come!!!

    • Anonymous

      Will they?
      Why?
      What is sitting on this land that people will flock to see?

      • Cecil Gray

        If you do not know then I cannot tell you.

        • Anonymous

          I do know – nothing.
          That would be the reason you can not tell me.
          I have seen this land – have you?

  • Anonymous

    She won’t be satisfied until she has turned the entire state of Maine into her own private national park, complete with her rules.

  • PabMainer

    Ms. Quimby appears to be a very generous person……

  • Anonymous

    One would think, as much as the BDN loves this woman, that they could get a new picture of her:)

    • northernmaine

      New or old pic she’d still be just as homely

  • Anonymous

    You know if Roxanne Quimby didn’t own land and want to have a park established, than the same people that whine about her and her land, will start whining about something else…..they are never happy unless they got something to whine about…..and we wonder why our tourist industry is going down the tubes.,.,…Maine used to be the “Vacation Land” No more!!!! We keep whining them right out of state.
    Who wants to be around people who whine all the time….I for one want to be around positive people doing positive things with their lives….

  • Anonymous

    Man, she’s going to shut down that trail… it’d be another thing if she was donating the land but putting restrictions on land and what not that use has done in the past needs to be changed…this time the state should put restrictions on this property instead of her… hopefully she doesn’t ruin this one for the public…and public use

  • Anonymous

    I am always upset, everytime they do a story about Roxanne, they mistakenly run a photo of Earnest Borgnine. I think someone does it on purpose.

  • ernie

    one ugly women or is that a man?

  • Anonymous

    I have 1400 acres of land just cut. It would make a beautiful park. Plenty room for benches. Enough trees have been cleared so you have a view since there are no mountains to view from. or it could be turn into a natural museum of harvested land.
    first $750,000 takes it

  • Michael Spaulding

    More land that will eventually be taken off the tax roles so the rest of us working people can pick up those taxes. Additionally if she successfully gives the and to the feds not only will we pay more to make up the lost tax revenue, we will have to pay more to manage additional public land. I believe Quimby has the right to do what she wants with her money and with her land but rue the cost to the rest of us.

  • Anonymous

    Watch the gates go up on the logging roads. The Wilson stream road in Elliotsville is a prime example. Although ordered by the Piscataquis county commissioners months ago to remove the gate it still remains their just waiting for her to get the chance to slam it shut again. This land that she owns should be taken out of tree growth and be taxed accordingly.

  • Anonymous

    It could be worse, she could have decided to develop it all as an ultra rich hosing compound. There are plenty that would do so and you can bet no ordinary person would be allowed in ever again.

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