Comments for: One plane crash victim believed to be from Maine, other two from out of state

Posted Nov. 17, 2012, at 8:44 a.m.
Last modified Nov. 17, 2012, at 3:20 p.m.

OWLS HEAD | Federal, state and local investigators were back Saturday morning at the scene of the plane crash that claimed the lives of three people whose identities are still not known. Officials now believe they know who the victims are but are waiting to contact family members, Knox …

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  • Millicent

    how the heck does Owls Head NOT know who was on the plane, or which plane it was? Don’t flights have to receive clearance for take-off or landing?

    • Anonymous

      yea something doesn’t add up with this story. One would assume the control tower would have the tail number on file from the days activities; don’t they keep a log?

      • Anonymous

        I don’t think Knox county airport has a tower.

        • Anonymous

          I see, thanks for the info.

    • On small airports, like Owls Head, they don’t have a tower to call for their clearance.They have a radio freq that they call for any planes or ground vehicles in area to see if it’s clear to take off.

    • Anonymous

      This is an uncontrolled field, meaning there is no air traffic control.

      • Millicent

        ah, thank you. –

  • KM92

    If it’s any insight to anyone there’s a small cesna that hasn’t returned to the general aviation in Bangor not sure if that’s the plane or not they found in Owls Head..

  • Anonymous

    There are only two regular control tower equipped airports in the state, Bangor and Portland. Back in the 90’s I used to fly into the Portland Jetport after the tower had closed for the evening. The rules then revert back to the same used at non-tower fields like Owls Head.

  • Anonymous

    The small regional airports like Knox County Regional(RKD) operate with what is known as CTAF/Unicom radio frequencies(123.05). Pilots are required to be on this freq and announce the movement of their aircraft on the field prior to departure. When in position to take off, they are required to announce the runway they are taking off from and their departure direction.

    The truck on the runway should have been equipped with either a hard wired or hand held radio tuned to the CTAF/Unicom freq(123.05). I know the article said it had one….on, off???

    Since none of us were there, or listening to the RKD unicom, we do not know if any of the above requirements were met.
    However, being a pilot, it will be interesting to learn what the driver of the truck(and a pilot, according to the article) will have to say in this tragic incident. Obviously there was a lack of communication and/or loss of visual contact on the part of the pilot and the truck driver.

    • Anonymous

      Unless the regulations have changed, aircraft radio communication is not required in class E airspace or for operations from a typical airport in E. Obviously it is a very good practice, but it isn’t regulatory.

      • Anonymous

        It IS FAA “recommended” procedure. And we’re talking about ground communications.
        Any pilot who operates as PIC of an aircraft on a non towered airport is extremely negligent in disregarding this very basic radio procedure….especially since there is semi-regular commercial air traffic into/out of RKD.

        • Anonymous

          As I said, it is very good practice, but it isn’t regulatory. You can legally operate VFR from Rockland with no operational radio on the aircraft. That would include taxi and takeoff, and it would not be considered negligent to operate that way if done so properly.
          Just pointing out that it was not a requirement for the aircraft. I am not sure what the regulations state about other non-aircraft surface vehicles.

          I agree that it is silly not to be monitoring CTAF and making position reports if you have the option to do so.

          • Anonymous

            Maybe it SHOULD be mandatory then. You can’t have a 20oz soda in NYC, but it’s okay not to have to use a radio at an airport? And just wth was that numbskull crossing the runway for anyway? It seems to me that an airport should only have vehicles running parallel to runways, if at all. Senseless loss of life here.

          • Anonymous

            Keep in mind that the facts are still unknown. Plenty of accidents have happened when pilots, and I am sure surface vehicles, use radios, but mistakenly report the wrong position. We will have to wait for the NTSB report for all of the details.

          • Anonymous

            You’re right, I should wait for all the facts. I guess I’m just tired of seeing so many senseless deaths everyday in the BDN. Most of them seem to be caused from people behaving stupidly.

  • Anonymous

    Airplanes, even small ones, have good running lights.
    Unless the pickup was parked on the runway prior to the pilot initiating the takeoff, it seems the truck driver is at fault. You don’t drive across an uncontrolled runway without checking to see that it is clear first.
    An apparently he was a pilot, so he would be doubly aware of the potential hazard.

  • kmish

    What’s the sense of having video cameras on site if they’re not operational??..Just sayin’

    • They were on, just didnt capture the crash that happened for away from the terminal building.

      • kmish

        Oh gotcha!

  • Mackenzie

    Knox VillageSoup reporting a story of an 11 year old girl who said she saw the plane “bouncing” then heard a crash and saw no lights on the plane. Interesting change of events before we go blaming the driver of the truck! Freak accident, not sure we should put the blame on anyone.

    • Anonymous

      A TRUCK WAS ON THE RUNWAY!!! WHAT IS HARD TO UNDERSTAND ABOUT THAT???? A TRUCK WAS ON THE RUNWAY!!!! RUNWAYS ARE FOR PLANES–A TRUCK WAS ON THE RUNWAY. You can’t blame the pilot because A TRUCK WAS ON THE RUNWAY!!!!

  • Anonymous

    This is a classic situation where some are responding who don’t know the facts or the rules. These uncontrolled airports operate under a set of “see and be seen” rules that do not require radio communication, but can be significantly enhanced by using the radio on the CTAF (common traffic advisory) frequency. These rules have worked effectively for decades as long as all parties keep their eyes outside the cockpit. Obviously that did not work in this situation and I am confident we will eventually find out why.

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