November 22, 2017
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Comments for: Cavities are unspeakable part of childhood, parenting

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  • Anonymous

    Have no fear..blame the kids grandparents and revenge of recessive genes! My sister had great teeth and my teeth financed many of my dentists boats. Also, of my five cousins (mothers side), 3 had great teeth, one not so good and one “normal”.  In a strange twist of fate, my aunt and I shared the same tooth structure (teeth cave towards the inside rather than protrude out!)..family genetic history at it’s best.   Keep up the good work and witty observations about life. 

  • Anonymous

    Nothing says you are a bad momma more than “advanced dental carries”.  My son has eight, yes eight silver caps.  I blame it on bad jeans and the fact that he is gluten intolerant which can cause tooth decay (or so I have heard).  I must have something to blame it on.  We brushed his teeth twice a day and he rarely drank juice.  Sometimes it just happens. Oh, and having three boys I totally get that they will fight over ANYTHING!!

  • My daughter who will be 14 soon has never had a cavity and yes, she eats junk food. She just has good strong teeth which she did not get from me because I have very soft teeth.

  • Anonymous

    If the kids have pitted teeth they are much more likely to get cavities. Sealants can help with that particular problem.

  • Anonymous

    Maybe their adult teeth will be caries free, let’s hope so.

  • Anonymous

    I have always been perplexed at how teeth can vary so widely from one person to another, even if they have the same dental habits. For example, a close friend of mine who I have known since elementary school (and I am in my 30’s now) has drank mt. dew, eaten lots of sugary foods and he usually brushes his teeth once per day before he goes to bed and he has never had a cavity in his life. I even looked at one point and sure enough, no cavities. I on the other hand rarely drink soda, rarely eat candy (maybe once a month), brush at least twice a day, and I have had more fillings than I can remember. Both of my parents have also had many filings and teeth that had to be pulled.  I had filings in my baby teeth and now in my adult teeth. Although this is just one isolated example, I think it shows that genetics plays a huge part in dental health. How can my friend not have any cavities?

    I once heard a dentist on tv say that he has heard people talk about soft teeth but has no idea what that means. I was a bit confused at this since I once had the dentist checking my tooth density with some sort of sharp metal instrument, which she actually got stuck in my tooth. It took just about all her strength to get it out and I never let her do that test again, but I think that is the definition of soft teeth.

  • Anonymous

    From what I understand, we are not born with the bacteria responsible  for tooth decay. When an adult shares a spoonful of icecream or whatever, that’s when it is transfered to the child. That could be total crap, but it kinda makes sense.

  • Anonymous

    My freshmen college roommate introduced me to floss. I’d never seen it before. A lot of older folks like me  would have had better teeth if we had eaten far better and flossed. 

  • Anonymous

    Bet your husband loves the description you gave of his teeth back in elementary school.

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