May 28, 2020
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Comments for: Electricity flows from ocean turbine to grid for first time in western hemisphere

  • Anonymous

    It’s not wind power, if anything their numbers will be more accurate because you can always count on the tides, where the wind doesn’t always turn those blades.  Either way a multi-tiered approach is what everyone needs, but not continuing with projects that are not up to snuff.

  • Anonymous

    Great news.
    The BDN has talking above doing something like this since I could read, if not longer.

  • Downeasta

    Lawn mower blades for aquatic creatures.

    • Anonymous

      So are boat propellers.  What’s your point?

    • Anonymous

      “Lawn mower blades for aquatic creatures.”

      Anything that swims or  crawls into those whirling blades has fulfilled its Darwinian destiny by becoming chum for the more intelligent members of its eco-system. 

      Same goes for any fisherman too dumb to read… or have … an up dated chart and so who sets his gear on a giant lawnmower blade.

      Or are you a fish hugger and a nanny state downesasta ? 

      lol

    • Free Bait chum to draw in— Lobstah!

    • Anonymous

      With a tidal current of 4-5 knots, I doubt they would be spinning fast enough to harm any aquatic life. Thanks for trying to interject some gloom and doom into something positive. 

  • Anonymous

    When will the Sierra club or HSUS file the first lawsuit in the western hemisphere against an ocean turbine

  • Anonymous

    At 21.5 cents per kilowatt,they can keep it!

    • pbmann

      As they add more turbines and improve eficiency, it will cost less than coal and NG and add not one bit of CO2 tot he atmosphere.

  • Kevin_Of_Bangor

    I didn’t realize how large they are until I saw the 3 men standing next to it.

  • And how long have they been doing this in the eastern hemisphere?

  • This technology is good news for Maine.

  • Anonymous

    I bet Bangor Hydro will be glad to pay 21.5 cents for a KWH that they sell to me for 17.5 cents!  I take it I’m paying for it another way, whatever this means : ”
    The price above the rate paid to other producers will be made up with a systems benefit charge to all electric users.”

    • pbmann

      Add in more turbines and increased efficiency and lower costs and soon it will cost less than coal and NG with no pollution. 

      Your ties to Oil, coal and NG industries is showing.

  • Anonymous

    This is huge. Sure, it’s just the beginning, maybe not a lot of power out of it right now. But the Model T was only the beginning of something, too. It cost money to invent, but sometimes development money is well spent, as it looks as if it might be in this case. Anyway, it was a heck of an accomplishment to get the thing working and I congratulate ORPC on it.

    • Anonymous

      But Henry Ford didn’t make Oldsmobile owners pay for his factory…

      • This Charming Man

        He borrowed money from banks, got deals from the local and state governments, and worked with other businesses.

        If you’re going to talk about Ford, you should learn something about him first.

      • What do you suppose powered his factory?

        You don’t suppose it was ” Hydro “do you?

        Wasn’t that the era of massive government sponsored hydro projects?

        • This Charming Man

          And the government funded railroads.

          It’s not that the anti-government crowd can’t do the math.

          They just won’t do ALL the math, and don’t like to show their work.

          • Also,

            The Tennessee Valley Authority comes to mind.

            Although some don’t have one.

          • Anonymous

            “To spur the development, those firms winning the bids would get higher payments from the state’s three big utility companies. The price above the rate paid to other producers will be made up with a systems benefit charge to all electric users”.

            And so, once again, Mainers’ continue to pay some of the highest utility rates in the country.

            The Coastal GA electric rates are exactly HALF of Maine’s.

            If Big Government is so “fair”, just why is it that we all don’t have access to a TVA subsidy?

          • The birth of a new industry comes at a price!

            It happened when Street Lights where invented that powered up entire cities.

            Some Leaches like the “Oil Industry” think that it is their God Given Right to stay on the “start up plan” forever!

        • County Escapee

          Ford’s River Rouge plant was mostly self contained and steam powered with even their own smelting furnaces. There was no real power grid as electric lights were a real luxury available to mostly urban areas.

          The Hoover Dam and a Tennessee projects weren’t built until the 1930’s depression era. Ford was selling T’s by 1905.

          • Anonymous

            Yeah – that rural electrification thingy was pure socialism.

            LOL

          • County Escapee

            Some people may say that, but at the time, it sure did more good and put far more to work than today’s stimulus package did. :)

          • Irrelevant Ford motor company still existed through the 1930’s and beyond!

            Without the government Public and postal roads as a basis of transportation in 1905 the motor car had no place to go!

          • County Escapee

            Of course Ford was still there in the 30’s! The comments were to the hydroelectric dams, etc. being available When Ford was created and whether only foot paths were available for cars to travel on at the same period. My reply to your other comment to me might explain how the old muddy ruts were “owned” by local governments. and the Old Boston Post Road et al were only used by the postal carriers and not owned or maintained by the Feds at the time of Ford’s formation…
            Over and out

          • Anonymous

            Um, the river rouge plant was squarely in an urban area, not far from downtown Detroit.

          • County Escapee

            Um, the “Rouge”was built in Dearborn (only now considered part of the greater Detroit region) which had a pop. of only 800 in 1910 and by 1930 had grown to 50,000! I wonder what caused that? It was certainly not “squarely in an urban area” a century ago.
            The site was chosen because of the proximity to the river for its for shipping capabilities.

      • Tyke

        Fords needed public roads to be a  feasible commercial product.
        .
        Are you claiming that Henry Ford personally paid for the US highway system?

        • County Escapee

          The Federal Highway system didn’t really start until  the 50’s. The model T rode already available rutted dirt wagon roads, while the first paved highway is recognized a much later and very short section of The Lincoln Highway. Most of the earlier T’s were also widely used as an all around farm implement when the majority of Americans lived on family farms.

          • Those rutted roads that you speak of where the Postal Roads Explictly listed in the Constitution as being under the power of the  government !

          • County Escapee

            Try this and see how it pertains to my reply to Tyke and refute your reply to me:

            The Federal Aid Road Act, as the first federal highway funding law, was instrumental in extending and improving the country’s road system. Prior to its passage (and for several decades afterward), the condition of many roads was deplorable; “They were often little more than trails that were muddy in the rain and dusty the rest of the time. Any long trip by automobile required not only time, patience, and ingenuity, but tire-patching equipment, tools, spare parts, and emergency food and fuel.” [4] A growing interest in road improvements was spurred by farmers who needed roads to take their goods to market, the introduction of Rural Free Delivery by the Postal Service, and the burgeoning popularity of the personal automobile. The 1907 Supreme Court case Wilson v. Shaw also paved the way for passage of the roads act by holding that the Commerce Clause authorized Congress to construct interstate highways.[5]By 1917, every state had a Highway Agency to administer the Federal funds. In 1918, the AASHO became the Bureau of Public Roads (BPR) with each state having an established chapter. The act focused on rural areas located near public forests while excluding cities altogether. Consequently, many felt the act was confused in its priorities, and it was criticized for not adequately addressing the need for roadbuilding and paving in urban areas.World War I and its concomitant demands on personnel and materials impeded the implementation of the 1916 Act, as did the Act’s small appropriation and its limit on federal funding to $10,000 per mile. These and other problems were addressed in the next national road bill, the Federal Aid Highway Act of 1921 (Phipps Act). [6] Most felt that the 1921 legislation was far superior.

          • Tyke

            I did not say “federal” highway system.
            .
            US governments at all levels have been building and maintaining roads for longer than the federalized highway system has existed.

          • County Escapee

            No, but you implied it with “the US highway system”, not by State and local roads which were all we had at the time.
            The first time the Feds bot involved in all that wasn’t until 1917. Ford had already been building cars for at least 12 years by that time

        • Anonymous

          You’re obviously right. Henry certainly didn’t build up his empire “all by himself” now did he!

          Gosh, now I wonder why there weren’t more “Henry Fords” out there with all that “help” from Big Government… He must have found it to be so simple!

      • Preston Nethercutt

        You certainly have lots to say. Pity none of it is of any value to intelligent people trying to discuss the beginning of a potentially game changing technology. 

        • Anonymous

           Thank you, Preston!   My thoughts exactly!!

      • Anonymous

        Oldsmobiles were never build by Ford.

        • hey-I’m-your-man

          But many parts were interchangeable!

      • Anonymous

         Is anyone talking about where these things will be made?China comes to mind

      • Anonymous

        21.5 cents hydro .vs. 6.4 cents nuclear. decomissioning Maine Yankee was a huge mistake.

        • Anonymous

          that does not include the external cost of waste management. However I have no Idea what it cost and could not actually add anything. 

      • In one of my favorite pictures of Henry Ford, Karl Kapp is giving him the Grand Cross of the German Eagle Order. I wonder who paid for that.

        The humble Farmer

    • Anonymous

      Hey, Henry!!  You didn’t build that!!

      • Anonymous

        Henry didn’t build the paved roads that made cars a truly viable means of transportation.

        Taxpayers did that. 

        Henry didn’t the dams and locks and navigable waterways that moved the gods he needed to  build cars.

        Taxpayers did that.

        Yessah

        • Kevin_Of_Bangor

          @munebaght:disqus wrote…. That moved the gods he needed to build cars…

          Nice typo, gave me a laugh.

        • Anonymous

          Of course.  And I’d wager that Henry wasn’t the only beneficiary of all that taxpayer generosity.  In addition, I’ll bet that Henry personally paid his fair share of that “investment” cost.  And when you consider all the taxes that have been and continue to be paid by his corporation, his employees, local and national businesses that were and are associated with the company, I’d guess he more than covers his obligation to our country.  And let’s not forget the charitiable contributions/foundations that ol’ opportunist Henry made possible due to the government’s foresight, risk and hard work in starting Ford Motor Company.

          Nossah?

          • In one of my favorite pictures of Henry Ford, Karl Kapp is
            giving him the Grand Cross of the German Eagle Order.

            The humble Farmer 

          • Anonymous

             I was wondering when somebody would pull out this tidbit.  There is an excellent wikipedia article about his German Honor and the anti-Semitic newspapers his company forced upon dealers.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_ford

    • Anonymous

      This should’ve been done long ago.  Tidal power on this scale has been done in several locations around the globe – and profitably – for almost 50 years.

      We are really behind the curve.

  • Anonymous

    nailed it!

  • Anonymous

    Always nice to hear from the Horse and Buggy Coalition.

    (P.S. How about some proper punctuation there, push?)

    • Anonymous

      Glad to see Jason is here, representing the anti-science, new age religion, the
      mother earth is the center of the universe crowd, the lunatic green
      fringe.

      • This Charming Man

        The R.O.I. is a factor of 1.8.

        Jobs, technology, innovation, leadership.

        And all without your approval !

    • Anonymous

      First  story was 75 to 100 homes.. Story modified this morning to 25 to 30 homes..  give it another day and I will have had it right.  The numbers will never be there to justify the cost..

      • pbmann

        “…It will produce 180 kilowatts at peak, enough to power 25-30 homes.

        ORPC officials said the two additional power systems expected to be installed in the fall of 2013 will raise production up to 540 kilowatts, enough electricity to power 75-100 homes. The company expects to continue to grow its production capacity in the coming years to eventually meet the 5 megawatt maximum in its contract with the PUC.”

        You really should read the article before commenting.  Eventually they expect to produce enough electricity to power 1200 to 1500 homes.  Not too shabby.

    • Anonymous

      unbelievable, you flaged my comment because I said it would only power 4 homes, I guess you don’t want the tuth to come out.

  • Anonymous

    Another member of the Horse and Buggy Coalition heard from.

    • Anonymous

      Loses something when all one can do is post the same refrain…

    • Anonymous

      Nope not a member just a fisherman that in my back yard 100 tons of scrap iron are on bottom taking up prime fishing area why not put it in an area that nobody can fish some place like reversing falls or the old sow to bad the only ones that loose is the fisherman that fish that area and then you wonder why i am dead set against it

  • Anonymous

    Impressive, and done in Maine!  Good job guys.

  • Anonymous

    That tells me nothing, make a comment that is relative to the conversation. So your saying this is the progress you’d want to pay for??

    • This Charming Man

      Let me explain it to you…

      Peak electricity from oil and coal costs more than baseline electricity, usually a LOT more.  

      When you grid tie systems that offset that peak load, it’s less expensive to cover the peak load.

      And fossil fuel peak load generators cost more every year to use.

      Say less, read and listen more.

  • This Charming Man

    Dirigo !!!

  • Turn off your lights then and light up the whale oil!

  • Anonymous

    This project was government subsidized.

    • Anonymous

      So are the roads you drive on.

    • Anonymous

      Thats where they make their money. couldn’t be done with private sector cash.

  • and_then

    Shhh!!! Whatever you do, don’t let Paulie L. read this! He doesn’t know that it’s happening here in Maine!

    It’ll be like when the dam was coming down behind his press conference over there in Old Town, in front of the nation he asked why they were tearing down the dam when they need more of ’em… even though it had taken 13 years to get all the agreements signed and that the agreement was applauded all over the country as a model of how utilities and environmental groups and Native tribes can work together for the better good of all, Uncle Paulie was aghast. (Adrianne forgot to tell him about it…)

  • Take that, coal companies! Way to go, great job, keep up the research and get better.

    • Anonymous

      You can buy your power from them if you like. Just call your power company and tell them that is where you want your power to come from.

  • Anonymous

    It appears that the pipe supporting the egg-beater looking turbine needs to reconfigured to facilitate laminar flow thereby increasing efficiency, maybe? 

  • Tyke

    Thank you governor King for promoting the policies and laws that promoted and enabled this project.

  • Some people get together and form a company that they hope will make them money generating electricity for their neighbors. And some of said neighbors who read about it in the paper think it is a good idea and some don’t. What it boils down to at any stage of the game is who is going to get their hands on the money. And Maine citizens jaw about it back and forth and let it go at that.

    Of course, the way to go in rural Maine is to have your own solar photovoltaic panels and solar hot water heaters on your house. But the folks who make their money providing energy for us have showed us printed facts and figures that prove that solar energy is not economically feasible in Maine. And if you say something over and over, a certain class of people will believe
    that it must be true. — And continue to feed the pig.

    So am I the only person in Maine who has seen his electric bill cut in half even as he heats his cellar for free by building his own solar hot water heaters and having friends hook up some Canadian photovoltaic panels in his backyard?

    Before I built these solar hot water heaters I was heating my water with an oil fired boiler. So I don’t even factor in the savings in oil expenses even as my light bill is cut in half.

    I discovered that the 8 solar hot water heaters I made with my own calloused hands did such a great job heating our domestic hot water that I hooked them up to some pex pipes I put into the 22’ x 12’ cellar floor under the new addition on my house. I’ve insulated and finished off that cellar room and would have moved my office down into my “mole hole” last week if I hadn’t spent so much time posting commentary on this blog.  

    On Saturday, October 13, I have been invited to be part of a Solar Tour. That is, many of us who are getting free energy from that big light bulb in the sky will have a “Solar Tour” sign out by the road in front of our homes. Interested parties will drive around Maine with a little map that tells where all of the solar units are located. Home owners will be on deck to explain how their solar units work and answer questions.

    http://www.nesea.org/gboh/

    True. Most of the people who are saving money with solar units are rich kids from away. If you read about it, it would scare you because boughten units are wicked expensive. But a couple of us with more need than money went down to the dump and dragged home some material and built our own.

    You are right. There are disadvantages to saving money by using free energy from the sun. The other day, when the town manager stopped by to help catch some cow friends that had made a bid for freedom, I invited him down into my solar heated cellar. 

    He looked around with approbation and said, “You got a building permit?”

    The humble Farmer

    • Anonymous

      Robert, I’m so pleased you, and Professor Dick Hill, aren’t fooled by the “profiteering snake oil salesmen” you’re afraid of; “But the folks who make their money providing energy for us have showed us printed facts and figures that prove that solar energy is not economically feasible in Maine. And if you say something over and over, a certain class of people will believethat it must be true. — And continue to feed the pig.”

      Do you really think we’re all so numb as to be unable to make our own decisions?

    • http://bangordailynews.com/2012/06/02/business/searsport-firm-aims-for-affordable-solar-hot-water/ 

      Since posting the above, Tom Gocze got back to me with this BDN article about his solar hot water heaters. I haven’t seen them but intend to as soon as I can because his technology is certainly way ahead of mine.

      Tom Gocze knows. 

      He has been kind enough to give me valuable advice whenever I have asked.

      The humble Farmer

    • Thank you, Humble Farmer!  You gave me a good laugh this morning.  I wish EVERYONE who thinks “green is great” would do a solar tour of homes, not just the rich homes, but the homes of the off grid humble folk who cobbled their systems together over time and are living simply because when you live off grid, REALLY off grid,  there’s no other way to live.  I have lived on 500 watts of solar power for over twenty five years so when the ‘green hysteria’ took over I was baffled that so many people wanted to live the way I did.  Of course the truth is, they don’t.  They just want to talk the talk and feel good about being politically correct.  Can solar power work here in Maine?  Of course it can, and it does for a bunch of us here in northern Maine.  My solar powered greenhouse provides heat to my home in Fort Kent when the temp is twenty below zero.  My solar panels power my LED lights and computer and deep well pump.  Next project: home made hybrid solar/wood stove hot water.  Batteries are the most expensive component of any off grid solar electric systems but considering what the electric rates are about to do thanks to the PUC and CMP, we should be helping more people climb on board the solar train.  You don’t have to be rich to be independent and self reliant.  

      • How do you power your computer with solar panels? Does your computer run on 12 volts, or do you have an inverter that raises the power to 120? It’s hard to find information about this because although top-drawer solar gurus try to educate me, they can’t seem to get what they’re saying down to a level where I can understand it. It goes without saying that I know absolutely nothing about electricity outside of “don’t stick your finger in there.” There is so much information about inverters on line that it doesn’t help because the first time you Google inverters you are swamped with incomprehensible alternatives. I have some PV solar panels I made myself, but then the gurus who taught me how to make them left without telling me how to hook them onto something. For three years I’ve been trying to find someone who will come here and actually hook a solar panel I’ve made onto a battery so I can see with my own eyes how to get some use out of the thing. Professional solar techies won’t touch anything but a factory made PV panel. The technology is available. The problem is finding someone who has the time and patience and know-how who is willing to explain to an old Maine man how to get some use out of a home made PV solar panel. 

        • Anonymous

          Robert-

          Run your solar panel into a charge controller, then connect the charge controller to your deep cycle battery. then connect that to your inverter to change the current from DC to AC. Plug your computer into your inverter – and there you go.

          All NEW housing construction should be solar powered IMO.

          Imagine the jobs that would create!

          Good Luck!

          • Thank you. I started with Charge Controller. Looked it up to see what it was. I read, “Charge controls come in all shapes, sizes, features, and price ranges.”

            So you can see that before I even move on, my first question has to be, “What is the model number/size/brand name of the charge controller that I should use?”

            And this is why it is hard to do anything without a guru on deck, because the answer to my question will be, “Well, what do you want to do with the charge controller? How many watts/amps/volts does your solar panel put out?” Each answer only produces several more questions and by the time I get the answer to one question and am working on the second question, I have usually forgotten why I asked the first question to begin with. 

            There are those of us who cannot conceptualize things in our heads. Even looking at a diagram doesn’t seem to help. I have built many things in my life but I never knew what it was going to look like until I finished, stood back, and looked at it. If I have built something with my hands, I can usually come close to building it again. But I can’t work from a set of instructions because instructions are usually written for people who are able to work without them. Important in between steps are usually left out of instructions because the people writing the instructions think the process is self-evident and figure that any fool will automatically know how to fill in the blank spots.

            Thank you anyway, for making an impossibly difficult operation sound childishly simple.  I challenge anyone with an IQ of less than 130 to put one of these things together in a week by just reading some instructions. — Without blowing something up or burning something down. 

            The humble Farmer

  • Anonymous

    I don’t know, an awful lot of money to power 25 to 30 homes and what are these things doing to the ocean  floor?  They’d have to cover a lot of ocean floor for enough electricity to power our smallest town.  But I guess if it makes us “feel” good then its okay to be fools.

    • Anonymous

      Yes – and the early automobiles, home computers, televisions, home video systems, radios, cell phones  et al. were “too expensive” as well.

      Please try to keep up.

      • Anonymous

        Sorry, you will never put these monstrocities in the same category as vehicles televisions etc.  Entirely different as once they are down there its safe to say they will stay there as they are.

  • Anonymous

    Huge piece of cr*p  to be put in the most corrosive, unforgiving, environment on earth.  Can’t wait to see the reliability on these things.  And we are to cover the sea flor with these things producing power at OVER 2 times the cost per kilowatt hour.
     
    Another great idea from the green people.

    • Anonymous

      Did you know the French have no word for entrepreneur?

      • Anonymous

        In France, no one ever “built it on their own”.

        If the next four years parallels the past four years over here, we’ll get rid of the word (and the deed) as well.

        • Anonymous

          In this instance  – conservatives are the ones that hate entrepreneur “job creators”.

          And I will remember your remark the next time I hear a conservative rave glowingly about France’s nuclear power program.

          Yessah

      • Anonymous

        The word must have originated in western Switzerland or southern Belgium then.

    • Anonymous

      The Rance 240 MW Tidal Station in France has operated since 1966 at a +40% capacity factor. Power is predictably dispatched with the tides and operating cost are far less than nuclear. The ORPC project is a pilot program moving at a pace which will permit the collection of operating data to determine performance characteristics and a template for future scale. Mass production will ensure economies of scale which should drive cost down by 80%-90%. Not all green ideas are bad and if this project doesn’t meet expectations it should be killed despite the fact that some other popular green energy sources get undeserved support.

  • Anonymous

    This is a large Lure to attract fish.. This will kill 1000’s of fish weekly

    • Anonymous

      Based on what evidence?

      No evidence.

      Yessah

      • I like what you have to say. I’m easier to find on line than you are so someday you might send me an email that would enable us to communicate in another forum. Yessah

        The humble Farmer

        • Anonymous

          What happens if you are fishing over one of these thingies, hook it and if winches you under water..Wind you right to the bottom….Then you could sue Zebco….

          • Anonymous

            Try letting go of the fishing pole.

          • Anonymous

            Never would of thunk to do that..

          • PabMainer

            Genius!!

    • Anonymous

      Are they loud?  Seriously, I think ten years from now these will be rusted relics littering our ocean floors.

    • Anonymous

      If you bothered to research the company’ studies the blades cannot move any faster than 80% of the speed of the tidal water or a maximum of 7.7 meters per second if and when that speed is ever achieved. Normal tide speed is 1-2 meters per second which means the blades make a complete turn about every three seconds. The fish that could be bait for the blades have far more to worry about when the “blues” or “stripers” are running.

    • Anonymous

      I know, that will make chum and attract more, oh my….It will never end..

  • Anonymous

    People who think egg beater power sources (wind and tidal) are a good Idea need only do one thing. Call your power company today and choose that for your power supply.. how are they going to survive if no one buys power from them… Be Green and do it today!!!!

  • Anonymous

    I see some people are flagging comments that  criticise this project.. WOW!!

    • Anonymous

      Yeah, I noticed that too.  It’s the free speech crowd who believe that only their speech should be heard.

  • Anonymous

    This is interesting, and has potential. Certainly more reliable than the outrageous visual blights that are industrial wind turbines. However it is incorrect to say that this is the first tidal power project in the US, much less the western hemisphere. There are many others, for example the Chelsea Piers development in NYC is completely powered by tidal power. The difference, of course, is that the businesses on the highly developed piers get the power, not the grid. this conversation should be about who benefits from these massive projects. In the case of power produced in Maine from wind, and probably tidal, MA and So New England, not our Maine communities. How about getting out of the grid and establishing regionally owned and controlled power authorities that produce power for Maine homes and businesses in their region, rather than for out of state homes and businesses. Each authority could configure their energy production and if they decide on a project that has a downside, whether environmental, visual or other, the people will at least be getting some benefits.

  • Anonymous

    Perhaps someday, the reporters and the BDN will learn a little about energy and physics and will publish useful information. Saying a turbine produces 180 kilowatts does not tell you how much energy it has produced. Power is a rate. You need a unit of time to tell you about energy produced.
     i.e. Produce at a rate of 180 kw for one hour and you have produced 180 kWh. Run at this rate all day and you get 4320 kWh.

    Tell us how many kWh per day these things generate. Same with wind turbines in other stories. Only then do we have useful info.

    Let’s use a car analogy. A car is capable of traveling at 75 miles per hour. How far has it gone?
    Obviously you cannot answer the question unless you know how long it has been traveling.

    According to the US Energy Information Association, as of 2008, the average US household uses about 30 kWh per day. 25 homes would use 750 kWh per day. With a power rating of 180 kW, the tidal turbine in the story would run about 4 hours and 10 minutes to generate that much energy.

    • Anonymous

      Key word here is “peak load”, or capacity

      It is more important to know the load or capacity, not how many hours.  If this turbine can supply 180kW  then in 24 hours it could have supplied 4,320 kWh  or 4.3 megawatts, this will depend on the actual load. 180 kW is the peak load.   That is about all one needs to know.  The load will vary throughout the day, usually the peak is the  5am to 8am and 4pm to 8pm time periods.  Load will be very light at 2am. 

      Same as buying a backup generator for a house, you need to know what the peak load will be at a given time –  you need  to get one that will handle the peak load when all of the power devices that you want running, are running,  IE: refrigerator, water pump,  furnace, TV etc; .  

       Does not matter how long those devices will be running at a given time, just how much power or load will be required at peak.  The load is not a constant.  In one  hour the peak load may be 1000 watts in that hour, the next hour there may be 5000 watts peak. So you would want a generator that could handle 5,000 watts – that peak load may be for only 5 minutes or much  longer.  The total power used will be a total of the low and high demands

      • Anonymous

        I think what Imperceptus is saying is that it would be nice to know the average power rate delivered to the grid that can be expected in a 24 hour period.

      • Anonymous

        With a generator, peak capacity tells you a lot. You need to be able to power your load. But, you choose how long it will operate. You start it and turn it off. You are not concerned with how much energy it will produce because you will just run it for as long as you need to get the job done.

        But with tidal or wind turbines, they run when they run. Nameplate capacity is only a potential. A 2 megawatt wind turbine produces nothing if it is not turning, yet its capacity remains 2 megawatts. I want hard data on how much power they actually produce per day/month/whatever in real world conditions.

        Also let me correct you on terms. A turbine with a capacity of 180 kW
        does not produce 4320 kW in 24 hours, it produces 4320 kW-hours.
        Kilowatts are a unit of power, a rate of generation. kWh is a unit of
        energy.

        Let’s run with your generator analogy. You buy a generator with sufficient capacity to handle your household load. How well will things work if there is no gas in the tank? Obviously, not well. You are not producing any energy, yet the generator still has the capacity to handle your load. This is my point with these turbines. We are told their capacity… great. But how much energy are they actually producing? (Before another science type gets picky with me… the turbines produce nothing due to laws of conservation. They are merely transforming kinetic energy of the wind or water into mechanical energy then into electrical energy.)

        Let me assure you the tidal generators do not produce 24 hours per day. They will produce nothing a high or low tide, because there is no flow at those times. There is a window between those points when the tidal current is sufficient to spin the turbines. A quick glance at the tide charts says peak production today would be at 2 am, 8 am, 2 pm, and 8 pm. Since the tidal cycle is about hours long, these production peaks will shift slightly every day.

  • No mention of what goes on in the aquatic world beneath the surface.  How do the fish/diving waterfowl interact with what  looks like a giant reel lawnmower spinning on the harbor floor, and if they are ecologically safe, can these things be used in our rivers?  Seems like rivers of adequate size would produce a lot more than tidal flow and be closer to the big cities and towns that require all the energy.

  • Anonymous

    Since the total cost of the project seems to be a secret I’m assuming it  cost on the low end 50 millon dollars R+D plus the equiptment itself..  Thats only 1 millon dollars per home, What a deal!!!   Where can I get myself some of that there grant money???

  • Anonymous

    Nice looking fish grinder..LOL

    • Downeasta

       I called them lawn mower blades for aquatic creatures.

      • Anonymous

        LOL on that..

  • Anonymous

    What happens if you are fishing over one of these thingies, hook it and if winches you under water..Wind you right to the bottom….Then you could sue Zebco….

  • Anonymous

    These people should be arrested for littering.

  • Patten_Pete

    OK, I’m interested in watching this. Simply because tides are predictable unlike useless wind power.

    There are tide tables.

    The are no wind tables.

  • Combine this with solar, wind, and hydro and kiss oil goodbye. Nothing like home grown energy. Buy the equipment, maintain it and the fuel is free and dependable.

    The big energy companies hate this. They are spending many millions of dollars to discredit renewable energy. The future is clean homegrown energy produced from renewable sources.  Produce it here. Use it here. Keep our energy dollars here.

  • Anonymous

    Thank You F D R , Your Dream and Vision Has Come in to its own!!!!!  Go Eastport !!!!!  Why are we talking Automobiles ??????  Enjoy the limelight for once ! This might put people back to work , Think about it! Not many places in the world this would work . Good Luck O R P C .

  • Anonymous

    So i guess posting a comment on my maine lobstermans page is less interesting than the humble bumble farmer ??? Thanks – For Nothing !!! Again  , Thank You F.D.R . !   Get R done .

  • Downeasta

    The interesting part is this can be used in rivers as well with out the need of a dam to block the passage of vessels.  Thus allowing commerce to continue in the area where the generator may be functioning.

  • Anonymous

    It does seem remiss not to have pointed out that Nova Scotia (not too far from Cobscook Bay) has had a tidal power station (of a different design) since 1984. It produces 80 – 100 megawatts of power daily, considerably more than this pilot project and five times more than its projected maximum. It’s been operational for almost 30 years. 

    But I guess if it didn’t happen in the USA, it doesn’t exist.

    http://www.nspower.ca/en/home/environment/renewableenergy/tidal/annapolis.aspx

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