September 18, 2019
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Comments for: Vinalhaven couple state’s only breeders of ‘super cute’ sugar glider pets

  • Anonymous

    I’ll concede the things are darned cute. But they also repulse me so I’m sticking with all things cat for now.

  • Anonymous

    I hear they taste like chicken.

    •  Hahahahahaha… I was gonna say. So are they TASTY?          I’d bet the cats are willing to play with them. Once!

  • Anonymous

    your sick… they are adorable!

  • How adorable!!!! I think I just may have to rethink my oath to never have another pet when mine are gone….

  • Anonymous

    Though they are cute, they are extremely loud at night and therefore do not make good pets. Honestly, who wants a pet that is naturally awake when humans sleep? It is irresponsible for anyone to breed and sell these cute critters because many people who buy them find that they are not able to handle the responsibility. Unfortunately, I predict that many of these adorable critters will wind up abandoned or killed.

    • Al Brady

       they’d probably go where my mommy said my fish george went…

    • Anonymous

      “It is irresponsible for anyone to breed and sell these cute critters because many people who buy them find that they are not able to handle the responsibility.”

      Substitute  “cute critters” with “cars”, “ATVs”, “alcohol”, “guns”, etc. etc. and you’ll see that you’re advocating trying to keep society safe from itself.

      How about personal accountability?

      • Anonymous

        Actually, I’m not trying to keep society safe–I’m trying to keep the Sugar Gliders safe.

        In any event, we actually do have laws in place to protect people from the substitutions you listed. We also try to educate people about using them safely. Maine has no restrictions on Sugar Gliders to keep them safe and this article does not do enough to educate people about how challenging they are to live with. If Lazaro were responsible, she’d have talked about that more in this interview.

        • This article is a few paragraphs long; one couldn’t possibly cover everything about gliders and their care in that amount of space. That is why my website is linked to. islandsugargliders.com

          I don’t know if you have ever been interviewed for anything, but Abby and I talked for over two hours yet the end result–this article–is short and sweet, like we had a five minute conversation. That is the way all media works; most of the raw material ends up on the cutting room floor, so to speak. 

          If someone walks away from reading my website, or talking to me about gliders, and thinks, “Wow, these pets sound perfect and easy!” then I have failed. It is part of my job as a responsible breeder to extensively interview potential homes. I also have a contract that both parties must sign that states if the new owner finds that the glider no longer fits with their life, whether tomorrow or eight years down the road, I will buy the glider back.  

          • Anonymous

            I apologize, I missed your link, and your website does seem careful. Realizing that you didn’t write it, I still think this article should stress the challenges that come with Sugar Gliders.

            And I still think that promoting the ownership of exotic animals is dangerous for the animals because many people only see how cute they are and are not equipped to actually take care if them. Kudos to you for being caring, but not everyone is so kind.

      • Anonymous

        What you describe are inanimate objects/substances.  A sugar glider is a living being.  It is very sad if you do not see the distinction.

    • Sugar gliders are not “extremely loud” at night. I do not know where you heard this. Yes they do make chirping noises, definately not extremely loud, and certainly  not constantly. We have a glider cage in our bedroom and the gliders never keep us up. As far as it being irresponsible to breed them  Hannah  has an adoption form, speaks extensively to  anyone truly wanting to adopt a glider from her, and makes sure that they understand all the care that goes into the glider. Hannah makes anyone adopting a glider from her sign paperwork indicating that they will not sell or give away the glider to anyone without first asking her if she would like to take the glider back. She would always be willing to take the glider back if someone realized they could not take care of it. Exactly what responsibility are you talking about, when you say not able to handle the responsibility? The gliders wake up between 7 and 7:30 at night. You play with them for a while (which you would with any other pet) and then they go back in their cage. Oh you have to feed them too (just like you would any other pet). You do have to make them a special slurry and give them a fresh fruit and veggie every night  but making a slurry that takes all of 5 minutes once a month or so and cutting up a fresh fruit and a fresh vegetable each night is simple and really not a huge responsibility compared to any other animal. Sugar gliders need specific care, just like any other animal needs specific care (cats need different things than dogs, dogs need different things than rats, etc.) So, I really don’t see how you can say that it is irresponsible for anyone to breed them when she ensures that they go to a good home, backs out of any adoption that doesn’t feel right in anyway, agrees to take the gliders back if things don’t work out, provides lifetime education for you about the gliders, runs a glider website dedicated to answering questions and talking with other glider owners and provides those adopting the glider with a very sweet pet that they can  play with for a while each night, and that other than cage cleaning (you would do this for any rat, gerbil, hampster, etc.) feeding and playing with does not require a ton of care. Hannah advises anyone looking for a glider that they are not for everyone and that the person should really decided with all the facts if the glider is truly a pet that they want and can take care of.  Please educate yourself more than just reading an article before you decide to comment. Your opinion is not always fact, do some research about the actual animal and about the breeder.

      • Anonymous

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvchGSugt44&feature=youtube_gdata_player

        I have looked into this before, it’s why I made the comment. There is a lot of responsibility in keeping these as pets, financial and otherwise. Please don’t pretend that there isn’t.

        The only thing I missed is the link to the breeder’s website, and I apologize for that.

        I still fear for the Sugar Gliders because breeders don’t have to be so careful about adopting them out. We know the human population can’t be trusted… look at all of the abandoned and overbred dogs and cats we have in this country.

  • United we stand,divided we beg

    I think that this is really cool!!! The meer educational factor of introducing these is great!! Something that we don’t usually get to see or care for!! They don’t seem that difficult to handle and I am sure that the Lazaros are VERY careful and selective who they sell them too! It would take the right owner and they should be properly educated on the right way to care for them but then again… so should people who own dogs, cats or anyother pet!! And to A_Dawn, not everyone is awake during the day and this would be perfect for people who for work or other assorted reasons must also sleep in the daytime!!! Congradulations to the Lazaros!!

  • Al Brady

    i heard they are an invasive species…

  • PaulNotBunyan

    1) In some places, including the animal’s native Australia, they are not allowed to be kept as pets, she said.

    2) They have sharp teeth and claws.

    3) The alarm bells in my head start ringing and I leave the pet store.

    Catch a bat and give it a makeover. You’ll save money that way.

    • Anonymous

      No need to makeover a bat, Paul.  We are fortunate to have flying squirrels here and they are remarkably similar to sugar gliders, except that they are free (in every sense). I’ve had as many as seven of them at one time feeding on suet bricks fastened to my porch railing. They glide in almost every evening in the winter months to frolic on the deck and are care and mess free.

      • PaulNotBunyan

        For those of us who decide our home isn’t also a zoo it’s easy to know which species are allowed inside the house. I started feeding birds, chipmunks and squirrels when I was a little kid.  I can honestly say that I never had any desire to touch or capture them. It just seemed like that wasn’t the right thing to do. My cat and dog are true pets and they fit in just fine here. The cat stays inside and the dog is leashed when he goes out. That seems to keep the peace between inside and outside critters.

        • Anonymous

           Dogs and cats didn’t start out inside a home either. It took someone deciding that they had a purpose that required domesticating them, and many, many years.

  • Anonymous

    Where do they go the bathroom??!!!

    • Anonymous

      A sugar glider goes potty in the sugar bowl.  C’mon, isn’t that pretty obvious?!

  • Anonymous

     Why in the world would someone want a nocturnal ‘pet’ that is known for being highly active?

  • Anonymous

    I read somewhere that in Colonial times New England children kept flying squirrels as pets, and played with them like furry Frisbies.

  • Anonymous

    They will never get to glide what a shame.

    • Anonymous

      I agree with you.  If they’re born to glide and they can’t it must not be good for them.  To be stuck in a cage all the time?  I feel the same way about birds.

  • Sectar114

    “The exotic pets are active at night and can glide up to 150 feet”…yea, i bet they get to do that a lot in those “spacious” cages…sad

  • Anonymous

    Just don’t feed them after midnight and never, EVER get them wet.

  • BancyNotwin

    Oh myyyy they are the cutest things! It’s best to get two if you decide to adopt, so they’ll always have a friend to play with in the wee hours of the night. Also, if you get them young enough they will bond with you for life. You can carry them around in your shirt!

  • Anonymous

    While they don’t appear to be the pet for me, they ARE pretty cute! I wish you both the best of luck!

  • Alykins

    “I wanted people in Maine to have a chance to get gliders,” she said
    Because Mainers are so good to the standard cats and dogs.
    :(

    Best wishes to Hannah. From what Heather says she sounds a lot like the woman I got my cat from, cautious and caring about the animals. Sadly, I agree with A_Dawn, and doubt the level of care these sweeties receive after adoption out of Hannah’s hands.

  • Anonymous

    They are the cutest little things I’ve ever seen. This lady is a true animal lover with so many kinds of pets. Please don’t tease about eating them.

  • Anonymous

    target practice , PULL.

  • Otis Guelpe

    Keeping animals captive for one’s amusement is unconscionable.

    • Anonymous

      You should set that high horse you are on free.

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