September 19, 2019
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Comments for: How to free your town from school consolidation

  • Anonymous

    Establish a one percent sales tax to help fund these RSU’s, it would be a year round funding help.

    • Anonymous

      Raise taxes to pay for this.  Only Democrats would put a foolish idea like that out.  How about going back to the drawing board.  How about doing it over and do districts that make regional sense and economic sense.   How about consolidating areas that are close together even areas that didn’t follow the law.   You could have a district like Waterville-Winslow-Fairfield- Oakland.  You can get a few towns in and around Augusta to consolidate which would make sense.  We need to do districts that would make sense today instead of drawing them up on a system that was built in the 1950’s.  We also need to get every department to look at partnerting up with others.  Finally get these sports programs budgets under control because they are seeing huge increases while dollars are being taken out of the classroom.

      • Anonymous

        We already pay for this in our real estate tax bills, a one percent sales tax would spread it out and be a year income, take some presure off the property tax payers.  Let summer visitors help with the school bill. Of course it is not what a lot like to hear, but I personally think sports should go
        the community somehow, and get out of the school system, of course I also think algerbra is a plot to dumb down kids, I would rid schools of it, because they never use it, I would rather see a very practical everyday math, how to keep a check book, and so on.

  • Anonymous

    we all knew it would be more expensive.  Democratic idot move.

  • Anonymous

    Get out now is right!  If it sounds too good to be true is usually is.

  • FELT

    Most people felt that forced consolidation, whether to fulfill Commissioner Gendron’s vision of a Provincial arrangement of 35 districts she could lecture every month; or the vision of accessing all the undervalued property in small waterfront towns with small schools and falling enrollment; or the one of people seeking new huge consolidated ‘do everything’ high and middle schools would result in a smoldering resentment in small towns losing a school that was the ‘heart & soul’ of the community. 

    Once gone; as with many things, the ‘go with the flow’ voters finally realized what was lost.

    So now we have to endure the expense of gluing humpty dumpty back together again and having to endure another legacy of the Baldacci era!

  • StillRelaxin

    What’s the difference between your little old schools and your big new ones?  Those in charge of telling you lies get to tell your even bigger ones while they get paid more to do it.

    • Anonymous

      You’ve had a positive experience with school I see.  Too bad for you, you
      missed out.

    • Anonymous

      So far Maine DOESN’T HAVE ANY BIG NEW SCHOOLS. The three former district STILL have their own schools-THAT’S WHY THEY HAVEN’T SAVED ANYTHING.

  • Anonymous

    Of course it didn’t save any money.  How could this scam possibly save any money?  The teachers will all be getting paid at the highest rate of any district in the consolidation.  80% of schoold costs are pay and benefits. 

    Just another failure in a loooong string of failures foisted on the people of Maine by the failed Baldacci administration.

  • Anonymous

    It wasn’t about savings, it was about control.. easier to indoctrinate the kids this way

    • Anonymous

      Oh my, indoctrination?

  • I have always been opposed to school consolidation although money was not my initial complaint.  I would be glad to elaborate for anyone who is interested.

    I voted against St. George going in with Thomaston when the vote first came up — as most of my neighbors now wish they had done.

    In a few of the letters below we see Baldacci blamed for school consolidation. And that is ok because blaming Clinton or Obama or Baldacci for even a bad apple crop is taken for granted on these pages.

    But although Baldacci’s misguided school policy certainly entitles him to a good share of the present SAD situation in Maine, he was only about three years old when St. George was suckered in.

    The humble Farmer

  • Anonymous

    Why doesn’t the state just honor it’s commitment (twice voted in by voters) that it pay 55% of local education costs and that would provide tax relief locally for all the towns whether they are in an RSU or not.

  • Anonymous

    The problem, chummy, is that you DON’T HAVE real school consolidation. If you had TRUE school consolidation you wouldn’t have three high schools in an area that really only needs ONE. Yeah, some students may have to ride the bus a little longer, but with three high schools you’ve got three times the administrators and facilities and, to be sure, some redundancy in the number of teachers. And out of all of that, you still DON’T have a full menu of course offerings because you don’t have enough demand in any one of the schools. The bottom line is Mainers want their cake and to be able to eat it too. Every little town demands to have its own schools so it can continue to believe in unicorns, I mean, local control, and they want them on the cheap. Education is not cheap, never has been, but it can be more cost effective, but you have to give up something to get it.

  • Anonymous

    Why is the state eliminating the top income tax bracket instead of funding schools at the 55% figure that has twice been approved by Maine voters?

  • Anonymous

    Merge. We need more Class A schools.

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