May 19, 2019
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Comments for: 49-year-old mystery solved: Recovered B-52 ejection seat was pilot’s, researcher says

  • County Escapee

    That’s when men were men and did what they had to do. 
    It’s a nice article except that I have to guess that Morrison was the copilot.

    • Nick Sambides Jr

      Just fixed that. Thanks for catching the dropped reference.

      • County Escapee

        S’all right. Just be as forgiving when I stray from the parameters of commenting!  :)

      • Anonymous

        None-the-less, a very good article.

        • Nick Sambides Jr

          Thanks. This was a very enjoyable bit of work for me. I am a huge
          history buff, especially military history, and to be among the group of people
          on Elephant Mountain that day was amazing. (Today’s paper shows a good weekend in that regard, with this story and the story on the Greenville Junction Depot restoration effort.) Such strange feelings emerged when we saw the seat. It was eerie, thrilling, awful, moving. A transporting experience.

          We knew we were seeing history in which men were killed, which was
          sobering enough, and I learned later that day that these men were on a mission of what I take to be great significance.  The ability to successfully penetrate communist radar cover at low altitude might have given the U.S. a significant deterrent to nuclear war. The flaw in the vertical stabilizer that caused the accident was corrected partly as a result of this crash, so this incident probably saved lives. (I think there were other crashes, too, that I wouldn’t want to shortchange by omission.)  

          I wish I could reproduce here the original coverage of the crash – the pictures of the pilots and other crew. God, they were so young! A hush came over the crowd when we first saw the seat, and for awhile we all spoke rather quietly.
          It was a very hot and sweaty day, with a lot of work attached to it –
          photography, video, writing, tweeting and telephoning, plus the arduous climb itself – and yet it seemed like all that fell away for a minute or two. One can take pride in the subtle reverence that we all seemed to feel, for anything
          that removes people from their own concerns, that gives them an opportunity to see things greater than themselves, is an illustration of goodness. I heard
          yesterday from Mr. Pratt that some of the rangers, who weren’t especially attracted to the crash until that day, have become a lot more interested in it since. Me too.

          • Anonymous

            Thanks for a great article and for including Pete Pratt in this.  He has been dedicated to this research and site for as long as he has lived in the region.

  • Anonymous

    Every time I see today’s pictures of the area I think back and remember how open the area was in June 1963 after the crash, on my way to Baker Pond with my Grandfather and how shocking it was to an 11 year old that didn’t have any idea about the crash (of course my Grandfather knew, just didn’t tell me about it).

    I’m glad that it is preserved as a reminder to future generations, of the sacrifices given, even if not in combat.

  • Anonymous

    Something to be said for the quality of the equipment that the Air Force installed in their bombers & fighters. When you look at the excellent condition of that ejection seat after some forty nine and a half years, it is amazing.
    Having had to eject from an F-4C in a Martin Baker Mk7, I understand full well the quality of that equipment the US Air Force installs in it’s aircraft, and I thank Almighty God that I am still here to write about it.

    • Anonymous

       Kind of makes one wonder who’s shed or barn the seat had been stored in all these years.

      •  Think i woke up drunk in that seat one morning on the dock of the Black Frog in Greenville.

    • Anonymous

      Thank you for your service. I have a special place in my heart for the ordinance the F4’s delivered ON TARGET in the central highlands years ago

      • Anonymous

        It was an honor and privilege to have served. Thank you.

        • Anonymous

           I bet you guys could tell some stories!  Thanks for your service gentleman.

      • Liberal Soup N Crackers

        …for the ordinance the F4’s delivered ON TARGET in the central highlands years ago…
        So THAT is what happened to Dover-Foxcroft.

        • Anonymous

          Doubt it- Sure were a welcome sight in Binh Dinh province!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Subject: [bdn] Re: 49-year-old mystery solved: Recovered B-52 ejection seat was pilot’s, researcher says

  • Anonymous

    Your B-52’s are still guarding America’s skies today.  The last ones manufactured through 1964 The B-52 H 48 years old and still protecting.  The comment about buying the right equipment is well defined in this aircraft.  A credit to yesterdays engineers.

    • Anonymous

      I just did a little research and the B-52 C’s were first assigned to the 42 BMW Loring AFB in 1956.  The last B-52 C rolled of the assembly line in December of 1956 and they were retired in 1971. (www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/systems/b-52c.htm).  So this seat is more than likely 56 years old as they are not something that are normally swaped around. 

      • Liberal Soup N Crackers
        • Anonymous

          In an earlier post i indicated that the B-52 H is still operational and assigned to (not in my original post) the 2nd bomb wing in Louisanna and 5th bomb wing in north dakota. In this one i indicated that the C model had been retired in 1971.

          Subject: [bdn] Re: 49-year-old mystery solved: Recovered B-52 ejection seat was pilot’s, researcher says

  • Anonymous

    Could someone tell me why it matters which seat it is?

    • Nick Sambides Jr

      It would be incongruous, to say the least, to discover the seat and not preserve it. Identifying who sat in it is an integral part of preserving and respecting the history of the event.

  • Liberal Soup N Crackers

    Mystery solved ….. probably.

  •  Endured 18 hours in subzero temperatures. Not to mention the horrible injuries they suffered.Must have been hell. Probably wished they had died during parts of that ordeal. 

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