May 26, 2020
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Comments for: Down East petition to open scallop fishing areas likely won’t sway closure decision

  • Anonymous

    i think theres alot of blame game on the western boats. but when the western boats leave the  locals drag it till the end of the season facts. n far as pat keliher says about juvenile scallops , there will always b juvenile scallops. its all a mad cycle thats all blamed on the fishermen, the state broke a treaty they said after 3 yrs they would open it , n far as drags destroying the bottom my friends come here after 50 knot winds + or a hurricane not a pretty site i’ll have u know . last i knew it says in GOD we trust on the currency . GOD says a man that don’t work wont eat , come on state of maine lets reason together.  a concerned commercial fishermam 4 all fishermnen my name is David Leach thank you

  • Anonymous

    i think scott emery and will hopkins should keep their noses out of it and when you do an interview talk to someone who makes their living commerical fishing not to someone who has fished ONLY two days all season scott emery lets get real we all need to put food on the table

    • Anonymous

      “We all need to put food on the table.”
      Even if it destroys the scallops for the next 20 years!
      There’s a good reason no one interviewed you. With you as our spokesperson we would ALL look bad.

  • Anonymous

    This article is probably some of the worst reporting I have ever read.  First, Tom Walsh, needs to get his facts straight.  In an article that he himself reported on not even a week ago on December 30th wrote 

    Although Keliher told those attending Tuesday’s emergency meeting that he would be meeting with Gov. Paul LePage this week to discuss options for addressing the dismal scallop harvest, that never happened due to schedule conflicts, Keliher said. Instead, Keliher discussed the situation with the governor’s staff.”  
    So that says to me there was no meeting with the governor as it clearly states above.  Not sure which one needs to keep their  lies straight, but they might want to start writing them down.
    Secondly, you might want to speak to someone that actually makes their living from commercial fishing.  Scott Emery obviously doesn’t need or rely on fishing.  Heck, when you only fish a few days out of a season, that’s saying something.  Wanting to close the whole coast down shows that he doesn’t give a crap about the rest of the fisherman and their families.  Good for you Scott, if you have enough money to pay your bills but most of the fisherman are just getting by.  And now, they are all barely getting by because of the closure and no alternative.
    Scott can blame the “western boats” all he wants but if he was a real fisherman that needed to work he would go where the work is.  Nobody is saying that the so called “non-western” boats couldn’t go to the open areas.  Actually, they would probably be well accepted.  Everybody is just looking to make a living.  I think David Leach, said it below, when the western boats leave, all the locals keep dragging.   They need to make a living also but you can’t just blame the “western boats”. 
    And, by the way, Mr. Hopkins, nobody said they were “surprised” that the scallop population is depleted in Cobscook Bay.   When you fish the same area year after year, it’s bound to happen.  Nobody is disagreeing with closing Cobscook Bay, like some people are making it out to be.  All they want is an alternative.  And the alternative is to open the areas that have been closed for 3 years already.  They aren’t asking to have it open seven days a week so they can go in and destroy it.  They want 2!  Two days!  That is it!  
    And as far as Commisioner Kaliher fielding “more phone calls from fishermen supporting the Cobscook Bay closure than from those who oppose it.”, well that’s because the ones who oppose it won’t call!  They all feel like it’s a waste of their oxygen because this is what happens. Nobody actually listens to what is being said.  Signing a petition is their only line of defense.  They went to the emergency meeting and obviously wasted most of their time.
    All these fisherman want is a place to work 2 days a week, seriously, I really don’t think it’s asking for the world.

    • Anonymous

      Not “fishing” but OVERfishing the same area year after year is what causes scallops to be depleted. That’s what I would argue.

  • Anonymous

    Just deal with it and stop whining, Easport.  Geeesh!

    • Anonymous

      Seriously? I hope you’re kidding. I’d like to see you lose your job and try to support your family with rising costs in fuel and keep food on the table. I can assure you that you would be doing the same thing these fisherman are doing. I don’t see it as “whining” I see it trying to maintain a living.

      • Anonymous

        Is pounding the remaining, undersized scallops maintaining a living or bankrupting our future?

        • Anonymous

          I don’t recall saying that I thought they should pound and scratch for scallops. I thought it was rude for someone to say “deal with it and stop whining” when there are people who have bills pay to me and mouths to feed. I was for closing South Bay but I think DMR should open an area that’s been closed for 3 years. I understand that the scallop situation is precarious and DMR is looking out for the future, however I’ve heard (yes hear say) that there are plenty of legal size scallops in the closed areas. I’m not an expert nor am I or my husband fisherman. This closure doesn’t affect me but it makes me mad when people are standing up for themselves and have proposed a plan that could work and people call it whining. Wouldn’t you do anything in your power to keep your job?

          • Anonymous

            He Does. He and his brother plasters the draggin bottom with traps so no one else can fish it.

  • Anonymous

    The part that doesn’t make much sense to me is that in the past the area opened a month before the rest of the state. This brought in 200 boats or more with no catch limit other then scallop size. This was changed significantly about 12 years ago with a December open, an increased ring size and a daily quota. Yet scalloping got worse? I remember boats numbering 200 or so for the first week catching 200 to 600 pounds per day. Now there is less then half as many boats with a quota which is far less then what used to be caught. Overfishing, I would have thought was more of a problem in the past. I’m wondering if the increased ring size has surpassed the scallops growth cycle in Cobscook Bay and how much GPS systems have affected the fishing. If you make a tow and hit scallops you can almost make the same tow again a lot more accurately then ever done in the past. Then there are the others that cut small scallops, they did it in the past but now the small scallops are larger because of the changed ring size. I’m not a biologist but there are factors at play here, what are they and how will it be corrected. The local fisherman in Lubec and Eastport have tried to fish in a conservative manner by changing the open date, setting quota and increasing ring size what is next?

    • Anonymous

      Increased ring size causing the problem? Really? The only thing limiting the scallops shell size is the shelling house.

      • Anonymous

        I’m not saying it does but if a scallops grew fastest up to a certain size then slowed wouldn’t it be possible that size limits could be beyond the fastest part of the growth cycle and why did 200 boats dragging alot of scallops the opening month for many years not see the problems they are having now. Unfortunately there has always been people cutting small scallops, are they worse now?

        • Anonymous

          Thanks for clarifying, Wes. Your comments are thought provoking. I agree, except for the 4 inch rings. The sampling in Whiting Bay showed tons of big scallops. They’ll definitely grow if they don’t get cut.
          The fishing pressure doesn’t even compare to the past. Hard to guess how it held up so long with such big catches and so many boats in days gone by.

  • Anonymous

    Scallops must be allowed to replenish… The only reason that Maine LOBSTER employs thousands of people is because lobster is well regulated and sustainable… Scallops are at less than 10 % of their former strength… This would be a no brainer, except for the people without brains…

    • Anonymous

      Scallops are regulated, if your know your facts.  The point here is that these closed areas have been closed and allowed to replenish.  They said it would be 3 years but they spun it so it took longer and got one over on the fishermen.  They are just trying to get back what they were promised in the first place.  It should have been open THIS scallop season.  AND the fishermen WANT it regulated!  Two days a week with a catch limit  is certainly not asking to go in and take everything they want.  How do you consider this to not be regulated?????  

      • Anonymous

        There was no spinning: the opening date has always been May of 2012.  If people thought it was going to open in January of 2012, it was because they didn’t read the regulation or any of the articles or press releases and/or haven’t been going to Scallop Advisory Council meetings or talking to people who know the facts.  I agree with much of what you’ve said, but it’s important to get the facts straight: no one on the SAC and no one at DMR ever said it would open in January of this year.  It was always going to be just prior to the opening of the 2012/2013 season. No one is trying to pull the wool over anyone’s eyes, and it’s not DMR’s fault if people are operating based on rumors and assumptions rather than actually checking the regulations or calling DMR offices or Marine Patrol.  Most of the regulators want this fishery to be profitable too. 

  • Anonymous

    Drags have to be outlawed.  It might be OK if they just caught scallops, but they take everything including the grass, seaweed and rocks, and leave the dragged area unproductive for anything for the next 5 years.

    • Anonymous

      No matter  how you spin it VOLDENUIT2, you are going to have the people that take everything.  ESPECIALLY if you don’t give them a place to work.  You are going to have way more illegal things going on and really ruin it.

  • Anonymous

    They already had scallop season in October and November. Urchin draggers got them all cleaned up and off to the freezers. Ten bucks a pound for scallops and the urchins to boot they laughed all the way to the bank. The law included.

  • Anonymous

    There have been times in the past when whole boat loads of scallops were dumped due to lack of market. The desire to fatten wallets or make a living (take your pick) is causing all fisheries world wide to suffer. When will it end? Probably when all the fish are gone. Sad, sad and more sad, but true.

    Some scallop draggers liken dragging to a farmer plowing the fields. Who was plowing these fields 200 years ago? answer—– nobody, there was plenty there because only what was needed to survive was removed, not what was needed to buy a brand new shiny F-250.

    Wait another few years and watch the lobster fishery in the same boat….. no pun intended.

    • Anonymous

      I can agree that there are some out there that like to fatten their wallets.  No matter what you do, you are always going to have those type of people.  Unfortunately, they make the rest of the working men look bad.  I can tell you that most of the fishermen around my area DO NOT drive brand new shiny vehicles.  Most of the trucks are older models, worn out from working, and probably are lucky to make it to the beach in the morning.  Don’t put all those people in the same category.  Most of these fishermen only remove what is needed and are just trying to survive. They aren’t driving around new vehicles with loads of money in their pockets like some make it out to be.

    • Anonymous

      I agree, they will destroy the Lobster Fishery next. Greed just sheer Greed.

    • Anonymous

      Dragging is like a farmer plowing his fields.
      If driving a bulldozer through your sweet peas is your idea of sustainable farming.

  • Anonymous

    So is the state going to reimburse the fisherman for there license fees and if they cant open the closed areas for 2 days per week maybe Lepage should take his open for business sign down.Or is there business stealing money from people that want to work.

  • Anonymous

    if they must shut down teh scallop fishing, they should have an alternative species for them to catch, and if they require new equipment, then low or no interest loans should be made to established fishermen/womeny to obtain the needed equipment.

  • Anonymous

    Live with it. You destroyed the scallop fishery and now your greed want to decimate the scallops for years to come.    No Way !!!!!!!!!!    Nasty disease that , ” Fisherman’s Greed” .

    • Anonymous

      I support BDN’s policy of letting this troll confirm his prepubescence and low brain weight with every post.

  • Anonymous

    I applaud the DMR and all the fishermen who are thinking of the future. Yes, it makes for hard times now, but if you continue to think only of the moment, you’ll always be struggling.  The fishery always has ups and downs, but if these closed areas are managed properly, the ups will be increased and the downs will be softened.  There’s a lot of misinformation being put out there by people who haven’t been following what’s gone on in the last four years: the Whiting Bay Denny’s Bay area was originally set to open in 2011, but it was fishermen in that area that requested it be postponed in order to avoid a gold rush of people from away rushing to the only open closed area.  Maine’s scallop fishery is on the verge of becoming far more sustainable and far more profitable.  Opening these closed areas now would be the worst thing anyone could possibly do, and it would only ensure that Maine’s scallop fishermen will continue to struggle rather than becoming more profitable.

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