Curiosity’s view from Mars

Posted Aug. 07, 2012, at 9:29 a.m.
Rising up in the distance is the highest peak of Mount Sharp at a height of about 3.4 miles. The Curiosity team hopes to drive the rover to the mountain to investigate its lower layers, which scientists think hold clues to past environmental change.
NASA
Rising up in the distance is the highest peak of Mount Sharp at a height of about 3.4 miles. The Curiosity team hopes to drive the rover to the mountain to investigate its lower layers, which scientists think hold clues to past environmental change.
Jennifer Trosper, left, Michael Malin and Joy Crisp from the , Mars Science Laboratory take questions during a news briefing on the last data and imagery from Sol 1 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., Monday, Aug. 6
Damian Dovarganes | AP
Jennifer Trosper, left, Michael Malin and Joy Crisp from the , Mars Science Laboratory take questions during a news briefing on the last data and imagery from Sol 1 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., Monday, Aug. 6
In this frame provided by NASA of a stop motion video taken during the NASA rover Mars landing, the heat shield falls away during Curiosity's descent to the surface of Mars on Sunday, Aug. 5.
NASA
In this frame provided by NASA of a stop motion video taken during the NASA rover Mars landing, the heat shield falls away during Curiosity's descent to the surface of Mars on Sunday, Aug. 5.
The first color landscape image of Mars from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows the landscape to the north and was acquired by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on the afternoon of the first day after landing on Aug. 6.
NASA
The first color landscape image of Mars from NASA's Mars rover Curiosity shows the landscape to the north and was acquired by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on the afternoon of the first day after landing on Aug. 6.
NASA's Curiosity rover and its parachute, left, descend to the Martian surface on Sunday, Aug. 5. The high-resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera captured this image of Curiosity while the orbiter was listening to transmissions from the rover.
NASA
NASA's Curiosity rover and its parachute, left, descend to the Martian surface on Sunday, Aug. 5. The high-resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera captured this image of Curiosity while the orbiter was listening to transmissions from the rover.
This photo shows one of the first images taken NASA's Curiosity rover. Part of the rim of Gale Crater, which is a feature the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined, stretches from the top middle to the top right of the image.
NASA
This photo shows one of the first images taken NASA's Curiosity rover. Part of the rim of Gale Crater, which is a feature the size of Connecticut and Rhode Island combined, stretches from the top middle to the top right of the image.
This Aug. 26, 2003 image made available by NASA shows Mars photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope on the planet's closest approach to Earth in 60,000 years. NASA’s robotic rover Curiosity landed safely on Mars late Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 to begin two years of exploration. The mission cost $2.5 billion.
NASA
This Aug. 26, 2003 image made available by NASA shows Mars photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope on the planet's closest approach to Earth in 60,000 years. NASA’s robotic rover Curiosity landed safely on Mars late Sunday, Aug. 5, 2012 to begin two years of exploration. The mission cost $2.5 billion.

NASA scientists hailed the Mars rover Curiosity’s flawless descent and landing as a ”miracle of engineering” on Monday as they scanned early images of an ancient crater that may hold clues about whether life took hold on Earth’s planetary cousin.

The one-ton, six-wheeled laboratory nailed an intricate and risky touchdown late on Sunday, much to the relief and joy of scientists and engineers eager to conduct NASA’s first astrobiology mission since the 1970s Viking probes. — Reuters

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