Maine outdoors begins right off our doorsteps

Posted Dec. 04, 2012, at 9:43 a.m.
Dave Small
Dave Small
Dave Small
Dave Small
Dave Small
Dave Small
Dave Small
Dave Small
Dave Small

It’s beginning to look a lot like Winter!

What a great week it’s been. Several photo outings went well, meaning a few subjects were found, a little exploring done, and a large measure of the great Maine outdoors consumed.

An outing to Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge offered a few really nice opportunities. The alder catkins were lit just right to add to my library. I’ve been trying to capture a tree sparrow image for nearly two years. Sparrows are tough to identify … especially with my eyes! I settled for picturing every sparrow that I saw, then working on the identification issue upon upload to my big screen. The yellow lower mandible is the key identification feature. I finally got my tree sparrow picture displaying the yellow lower mandible prominently.

After a mile and a half hike out to one of the marsh overlooks, I suddenly realized that a dark image across the brook was a large bull moose. I get focused at times like this. There was another large antler just barely visible above the sedge. As I began shooting with the Canon, I became aware that there was a third moose.

What a spectacular sighting of such a majestic animal. I’ve been a lot closer to moose and obtained clearer and sharper images, but these have captured a special memory for me.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, “Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is a magical place.”

I-95 in Hampden offered the red-tailed hawk photo … my first of this proud bird. The pine grosbeaks have been visiting the cherry trees at the Lyle Littlefield Ornamental Garden at the University of Maine campus in Orono They are a lot of fun to watch.

On the Penobscot River just below Costigan I found a raft of goldeneye ducks. I’m always happy to see them arrive.

Right in my own backyard, this gray squirrel provided lots of entertainment trying to extract seeds from this pumpkin. I cut a two-inch hole in the pumpkin’s side, then watched as the squirrels chewed a larger hole, then started entering to get the seeds.

The wonderful Maine outdoors begins right off our doorsteps.

Enjoy!

Checkout this special Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge gallery on my website.

 

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