Last of winter from over the Penobscot

Posted March 26, 2013, at 5:56 a.m.
The recently replaced Piscataquis River bridge in Howland looking toward the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt.
The recently replaced Piscataquis River bridge in Howland looking toward the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt. Buy Photo
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt.
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt. Buy Photo
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt.
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt. Buy Photo
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt.
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt. Buy Photo
The Penobscot River Bridge in Howland is among many bridges that cross the Penobscot River. Seen during the 2013 spring melt.
The Penobscot River Bridge in Howland is among many bridges that cross the Penobscot River. Seen during the 2013 spring melt. Buy Photo
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt.
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt. Buy Photo
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt.
An aerial view of the Penobscot River during the 2013 spring melt. Buy Photo

The Penobscot is one of the largest river systems in New England. The source of the river, which flows from northern branches that cross most of the state, finally carries its waters to the Penobscot Bay and out to sea.

In March, the spring melt delivers massive chunks of ice past the city of Bangor with the river’s flow. The floating glaciers and sheets of ice that crisscross the river can vanish overnight when warm temperatures settle in.

These are a series of aerial photographs of the Penobscot River at the beginning of the spring melt.

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