Acadia National Park’s icy beauty

Posted March 07, 2014, at 6:13 a.m.
Like a frozen waterfall, a four-story high wall of ice clings to the rocks near Otter Point in Acadia National Park at dawn.
Robert F. Bukaty
Like a frozen waterfall, a four-story high wall of ice clings to the rocks near Otter Point in Acadia National Park at dawn. Buy Photo
Early morning light shines through icicles on the rocks at Acadia National Park.
Robert F. Bukaty
Early morning light shines through icicles on the rocks at Acadia National Park. Buy Photo
Water droplets are frozen in place by a 1/8000 of a second shutter-speed in this image of a stream of water spouting out of the ice near the shore at Acadia National Park.
Robert F. Bukaty
Water droplets are frozen in place by a 1/8000 of a second shutter-speed in this image of a stream of water spouting out of the ice near the shore at Acadia National Park. Buy Photo
Minerals and other substances add earth-toned colors to icicles along the rocky coast at Acadia National Park in Maine.
Robert F. Bukaty
Minerals and other substances add earth-toned colors to icicles along the rocky coast at Acadia National Park in Maine. Buy Photo
Winter still has it's grip on Acadia National Park, just south of Thunder Hole.
Robert F. Bukaty
Winter still has it's grip on Acadia National Park, just south of Thunder Hole. Buy Photo
Like a bathtub ring, frozen seawater reveals the high-tide line on the rocks near Otter Point at Acadia National Park last Tuesday morning. The temperature was 1 degree F.
Robert F. Bukaty
Like a bathtub ring, frozen seawater reveals the high-tide line on the rocks near Otter Point at Acadia National Park last Tuesday morning. The temperature was 1 degree F. Buy Photo
Icicles are silhouetted by the morning sky at Acadia National Park.
Robert F. Bukaty
Icicles are silhouetted by the morning sky at Acadia National Park. Buy Photo

Acadia National Park is well known for its rugged natural beauty.  It attracts more than two million visitors each year.  Most of those folks come between July and September.

But Acadia’s scenery in the winter is equally stunning.  It’s a time the locals practically have the park all to themselves.

Photographer Robert Bukaty visited the park for a few days earlier this week, exploring the coast at dawn and skiing up – and down – the Cadillac Mountain road in the afternoons.

For three nights he had the entire Blackwoods Campground to himself.  No black flies, no thieving red squirrels, no noisy neighbors.

While brewing coffee early Tuesday morning he wondered why there weren’t any other campers. Then he looked at his thermometer. It was 1 degree.

This week’s photo essay, focusing on the icy coastline, is the first in a series of MaineFrames from Acadia.

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