2011 Bangor Daily News Original Outhouse Contest

Posted July 18, 2011, at 10:01 a.m.
I believe my outhouse should merit consideration because: It was built in 1947. It’s a two-holer. No. One for the little guys, No. Two for the big-uns.
The sign outside above the door says “men,” but really it’s a unisex two-holer. It was erected when our log cabin came in two parts by railway from Aroostook County.
Outhouse No. 2
This outhouse was originally erected to be used as a pitstop for the snowmobile club in 1960.
It is grandfathered and is being considered as a stop for ATV (4-wheeler) club on the trail to be cleared once again, soon. It has housed a lot of spiders and mice during hard winters.
Richard E. Leen
I believe my outhouse should merit consideration because: It was built in 1947. It’s a two-holer. No. One for the little guys, No. Two for the big-uns. The sign outside above the door says “men,” but really it’s a unisex two-holer. It was erected when our log cabin came in two parts by railway from Aroostook County. Outhouse No. 2 This outhouse was originally erected to be used as a pitstop for the snowmobile club in 1960. It is grandfathered and is being considered as a stop for ATV (4-wheeler) club on the trail to be cleared once again, soon. It has housed a lot of spiders and mice during hard winters.
I believe my outhouse should merit consideration because: It was built in 1947. It’s a two-holer. No. One for the little guys, No. Two for the big-uns.
The sign outside above the door says “men,” but really it’s a unisex two-holer. It was erected when our log cabin came in two parts by railway from Aroostook County.
Outhouse No. 2
This outhouse was originally erected to be used as a pitstop for the snowmobile club in 1960.
It is grandfathered and is being considered as a stop for ATV (4-wheeler) club on the trail to be cleared once again, soon. It has housed a lot of spiders and mice during hard winters.
Richard E. Leen
I believe my outhouse should merit consideration because: It was built in 1947. It’s a two-holer. No. One for the little guys, No. Two for the big-uns. The sign outside above the door says “men,” but really it’s a unisex two-holer. It was erected when our log cabin came in two parts by railway from Aroostook County. Outhouse No. 2 This outhouse was originally erected to be used as a pitstop for the snowmobile club in 1960. It is grandfathered and is being considered as a stop for ATV (4-wheeler) club on the trail to be cleared once again, soon. It has housed a lot of spiders and mice during hard winters.
I believe my outhouse should merit consideration because: It was built in 1947. It’s a two-holer. No. One for the little guys, No. Two for the big-uns.
The sign outside above the door says “men,” but really it’s a unisex two-holer. It was erected when our log cabin came in two parts by railway from Aroostook County.
Outhouse No. 2
This outhouse was originally erected to be used as a pitstop for the snowmobile club in 1960.
It is grandfathered and is being considered as a stop for ATV (4-wheeler) club on the trail to be cleared once again, soon. It has housed a lot of spiders and mice during hard winters.
Richard E. Leen
I believe my outhouse should merit consideration because: It was built in 1947. It’s a two-holer. No. One for the little guys, No. Two for the big-uns. The sign outside above the door says “men,” but really it’s a unisex two-holer. It was erected when our log cabin came in two parts by railway from Aroostook County. Outhouse No. 2 This outhouse was originally erected to be used as a pitstop for the snowmobile club in 1960. It is grandfathered and is being considered as a stop for ATV (4-wheeler) club on the trail to be cleared once again, soon. It has housed a lot of spiders and mice during hard winters.
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free.
When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home.
He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
Ronald Haines
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free. When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home. He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free.
When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home.
He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
Ronald Haines
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free. When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home. He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free.
When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home.
He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
Ronald Haines
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free. When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home. He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free.
When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home.
He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
Ronald Haines
My husband is a collector of outhouses (he has 5). Of our two favorites, we chose this one to enter. FDR instituted the WPA (Work Progress Adm.) in 1935. Outhouses were built and offered to the public for $5. If you didn’t have the $5, you could get one for free. When he went to look at this one being demolished, he thought it was really in bad shape, but after longer assessment, realized it was a WPA, so he decided that was pretty special and we brought it home. He not only refurbished the outhouse to original, but located a manikan, reconfigured it to a sitting position, so now our outhouse is occupied by “Poopin Pete” as our 4-year-old grandson calls him. We have many visitors come to view our outhouses.
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
Laine Beede-Harvey
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
Laine Beede-Harvey
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
Laine Beede-Harvey
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
Laine Beede-Harvey
My outhouse #1 is special because it belonged to Grammy Harvey in Guilford. Me + I inherited it and recovered it myself- it has an iron stove pot. Outhouse #2 belongs to my neighbor on Madison St.- it is probably a 1845 house- it is her barn and six kids used it.
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door.
When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
Brenda Chapman
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door. When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door.
When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
Brenda Chapman
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door. When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door.
When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
Brenda Chapman
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door. When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door.
When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
Brenda Chapman
This outhouse was built 20 years ago. Two years ago at a family reunion we rigged the Halloween skeleton with a fishing line hooked to the door and hand of the skeleton to raise as you open the door. When family and guests came, we told them to open the door and see how cute we fixed it up. Needless to say many screams were bought forth, and laughs.
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Richard E. Faust
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Richard E. Faust
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Richard E. Faust
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Richard E. Faust
Our outhouse (still very much in use) located at our camp on Molasses Pond in Eastbrook. As one uses the outhouse, you are surrounded by the “wisdom of the centuries.” There are several hundred quotations, advice, philosophy, astute observations, clues to the “good life” and guides leading to a productive career. If you spend enough time during your “visit” and carefully read them all, you are awarded an honorary PhD.
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well.
Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility.
The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant.
The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
David Smith
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well. Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility. The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant. The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well.
Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility.
The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant.
The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
David Smith
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well. Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility. The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant. The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well.
Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility.
The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant.
The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
David Smith
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well. Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility. The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant. The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well.
Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility.
The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant.
The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
David Smith
Constructed from scrap material in 1951, this versatile outhouse has served three generations of the Smith family of Bucksport very well. Not only is it provided with a separate urinal in addition to the usual toilet seat, but both items are easily removed to facilitate easy “dig out” each spring. Appropriate gender labels guide the novice to the correct facility. The windowpane built into the door allows a fine view of Lake Alamoosook while still providing the necessary privacy for the occupant. The three-shelf library is stocked with a variety of magazines and pamphlets cover a wide range of subjects.
My outhouse is so great that even Santa stops by once a year to drop off a “gift.”
It is located at a camp near Parlin Pond, north of The Forks.
If you don’t have a sleigh, you can drive to it by the dirt logging road nearby.
Ron & Don Joseph
My outhouse is so great that even Santa stops by once a year to drop off a “gift.” It is located at a camp near Parlin Pond, north of The Forks. If you don’t have a sleigh, you can drive to it by the dirt logging road nearby.
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme.
The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up.
It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Walter Whitney
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme. The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up. It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme.
The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up.
It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Walter Whitney
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme. The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up. It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme.
The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up.
It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Walter Whitney
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme. The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up. It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme.
The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up.
It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Walter Whitney
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme. The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up. It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme.
The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up.
It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
Walter Whitney
Two years ago during the peak of winter, a nagging feeling came over me that something was missing. As I looked out the window and deliberated with myself, I decided the time had come. In three feet of snow the location was determined, materials were gathered and construction began. The outdoor facility was strategically placed in a private location at the edge of the property, specifically chosen for privacy to prevent embarrassment from unexpected bodily noises and aromas. The critical construction materials for this particular facility consisted of boards from an old building, rusty, non-matching hinges from a chicken coop, ⅓ squares of red wood shingles, diamond shaped windows, a rope long and strong enough to make a reachable sturdy looped doorknob to close the door and keep the chickens and other intruders out, and a fresh bag of lyme. The diamond-shaped windows that allow daylight and moonlight in are one of the many special features that this outdoor facility has to offer. Some additional exterior features consist of a hanging plant, a kerosene lantern, and an upside down horseshoe to trap in luck and not let it out. The interior has two seats that have hand-carved covers for when they aren’t in use and are marked “his” and “hers.” Between the seats is a 1903 Sears & Roebuck catalog that serves a dual purpose: to maintain personal hygiene and for interesting reading (did you know a 12-gauge shotgun was only $7.95?). Additional entertainment for the user consists of drawings from a neighborhood artist that are made up of sets of squares. Each square is in a different language and represents men from different places using their lavatories. For example, one square is a man from Alaska in an igloo with his hands out and thumbs up. It is understandably difficult to believe that anyone who would spend this much time building an outdoor facility with these offerings would have much of a life, but you’ll have to ask my friends to find out, if you can find any.
I have been using my outhouse every day since ‘73, having moved to Machias as a 25-year-old back-to-the-lander. We were renting a tiny cottage down the road while preparing to build our own cabin. But first things first -- I prefabricated a 4-foot by 4-foot outhouse, cutting each stud and board by hand and carrying the pieces to my site in the woods, as this was even before a road had been built.
My outhouse was the first structure on the land, and also my first carpentry project. Being an artist, of course, I had to get fancy and cut some rounded cedar cshingles for a strip across the front. I also carved the four phases of the moon into a pine board for the facia and I had a small, but tall, stained glass window with no home, so I put it in the eastern wall. you could see the sunrise in red, orange, purple, green and brown. My door has the traditional crescent moon.
I had read up on outhouse design, especially Chick Sales’ wonderful “The Specialist” and decided on a two-holer. Usually no one shares, but it gives lots of extra room for books and magazines and being two buckets means it’s that muc hlonger until I have to clean out.
Cleaning is as simple as pulling up on the back door flap and taking out two 5-gallon buckets for the compost. I ask my “depositers” to cover any deposits with a scoop of the mixture of peat/wood ash I provide in another 5-gallon bucket. I cut down maple syrup jugs for the scoops. TP resides on a small branch growing from the side of a 1-inch spruce.
Then there’s the walls! For me, the outhouse is a place of quiet contemplation and visual stimulation from the ever-growing, ever-changing collage of pictures, postcards, photos, cartoons, etc. that I affix to the walls.
The original outhouse site turned out not to be where we decided to build, so we did what homesteaders always do - had a potluck supper. When everyone was feeling strong enough, we picked it up on long poles and carried it to its new, and present, site between the cabin and the rabbit barn by way of the woodpile.
After 38 years, my outhouse is my old friend and a true “comfort station.” Since I choose to have composting toilets ONLY, both indoor and outdoor, SHE is an integral member of the homestead. The stained glass window has moved on to the east wall of my kitchen in the big house, replaced by a bumpy opaque glass one. Other than that, she’s pretty much the same as new, but with a weather look, as much as I could say of myself.
Gillyin Gatto
I have been using my outhouse every day since ‘73, having moved to Machias as a 25-year-old back-to-the-lander. We were renting a tiny cottage down the road while preparing to build our own cabin. But first things first -- I prefabricated a 4-foot by 4-foot outhouse, cutting each stud and board by hand and carrying the pieces to my site in the woods, as this was even before a road had been built. My outhouse was the first structure on the land, and also my first carpentry project. Being an artist, of course, I had to get fancy and cut some rounded cedar cshingles for a strip across the front. I also carved the four phases of the moon into a pine board for the facia and I had a small, but tall, stained glass window with no home, so I put it in the eastern wall. you could see the sunrise in red, orange, purple, green and brown. My door has the traditional crescent moon. I had read up on outhouse design, especially Chick Sales’ wonderful “The Specialist” and decided on a two-holer. Usually no one shares, but it gives lots of extra room for books and magazines and being two buckets means it’s that muc hlonger until I have to clean out. Cleaning is as simple as pulling up on the back door flap and taking out two 5-gallon buckets for the compost. I ask my “depositers” to cover any deposits with a scoop of the mixture of peat/wood ash I provide in another 5-gallon bucket. I cut down maple syrup jugs for the scoops. TP resides on a small branch growing from the side of a 1-inch spruce. Then there’s the walls! For me, the outhouse is a place of quiet contemplation and visual stimulation from the ever-growing, ever-changing collage of pictures, postcards, photos, cartoons, etc. that I affix to the walls. The original outhouse site turned out not to be where we decided to build, so we did what homesteaders always do - had a potluck supper. When everyone was feeling strong enough, we picked it up on long poles and carried it to its new, and present, site between the cabin and the rabbit barn by way of the woodpile. After 38 years, my outhouse is my old friend and a true “comfort station.” Since I choose to have composting toilets ONLY, both indoor and outdoor, SHE is an integral member of the homestead. The stained glass window has moved on to the east wall of my kitchen in the big house, replaced by a bumpy opaque glass one. Other than that, she’s pretty much the same as new, but with a weather look, as much as I could say of myself.
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
Linda Alley
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
Linda Alley
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
Linda Alley
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
Linda Alley
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
Linda Alley
This outhouse is sure a prize winner to me. I have begged my husband to do some much needed repairs. It leans heavily to one side and the cracks in the door, covered by old linoleum, do little to keep the winter breezes or mosquitoes out. I have now asked that for all occasions that might involve a gift, all I want is repairs to our outhouse. All occasions are included: Birthday (September, we’ll see if it does any good soon), anniversary, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Valentine’s Day … anything, but please update our privy a little. His response is that it has too much sentimental value and history. Believe me, he doesn’t hurry when he uses it. He and Uncle Henry’s are very good friends. On the wall inside there is a signature by John Tibbetts dates 1934 (a deceased family member), plus other notations on the walls. This outhouse has been used by four generations and was built prior to February 1930 when my husband’s grandparents purchased the cottage from the Maine Seacoast Missionary Society. The history of this place reflects back to when the Maine Seacoast Mission boat would chug up the river, what their purpose was I am not sure; supplies, encouragement, or maybe just the “good news” of God. This was prior to electricity and a small settlement complete with school was on the island. Now our cottage and fancy privy are pretty much all that remain. We venture to our lovely spot in all seasons, the draft during the winter makes you scurry about your business. My humor during company visits is vast -- most try to come and go without a trip to our fancy comode and those that do go usually have a comment or two to share upon return. Signs posted outside read “Outhouse” and “Ye Old Outhouse,” which it definitely qualifies. My dry wit extends to the outhouse where it is complete with air fresheners and a toilet plunger, in case it is needed. We also have a small cemetery with approximately 20 burial lots on our property, reflecting old days and times. The outhouse has seen the best and worst of what life has to offer and the view is spectacular if you leave the door open while going about your business.
Linda Alley
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board.
It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power.
Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic.
Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.”
Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board. It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power. Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic. Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.” Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board.
It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power.
Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic.
Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.”
Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board. It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power. Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic. Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.” Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board.
It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power.
Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic.
Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.”
Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board. It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power. Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic. Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.” Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board.
It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power.
Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic.
Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.”
Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board. It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power. Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic. Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.” Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board.
It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power.
Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic.
Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.”
Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
My favorite original outhouse is one that we built IN our house … located off a hallway near the back door. It has a regular flush toilet that we encased in barn boards to look like a one-holer -- to flush, just lift the top board. It’s in a tight, small space so I couldn’t get far enough away to take a photo that shows the whole room at once. On the left is a shelf where I keep all my old oil lamps, which come in handy when we lost power. Hanging in the corner is the light -- an old lantern that has been electrified. As you can see in the photo, I don’t dust it, so it looks more authentic. Another photo shows the outhouse rules, and the fourth photo is a picture hanging on the wall of an “outdoor outhouse.” Everyone who comes to visit loves our “inhouse outhouse.”
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!”
I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing.
Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look.
Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try.
Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look.
Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!” I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing. Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look. Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try. Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look. Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!”
I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing.
Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look.
Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try.
Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look.
Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!” I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing. Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look. Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try. Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look. Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!”
I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing.
Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look.
Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try.
Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look.
Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!” I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing. Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look. Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try. Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look. Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!”
I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing.
Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look.
Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try.
Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look.
Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
Growing up in the 1940s, outdoor toilets weren’t uncommon. I remember going there after meals to avoid washing dishes. A Sears Roebuck Catalogue was a staple, not for reading as you might think, but toilet paper. No wonder old timers spoke of having “pyles!” I inherited a log cabin built on Lake Sysladobsis in the 1930s. No indoor plumbing facilities … behold the backhouse. The younger generation was appalled, turned up their noses. We developed our original shabby-chic look in our ancestor’s original outhouse to make it more appealing. Primitive toille was painted on walls. Matching cushions placed on the stool provide comfort for mothers waiting for small children. No Sears Roebuck Catalogue, we have a 1913 edition of Abercrombie and Fitch. It better not be used for toilet paper! My aunt’s original bowl and pitcher sit in the corner for hand washing. If you’re in a hurry, it’s okay to use the handiwipes. Plenty of old nails provide a place to hang towels. Flowers add good smells, make you feel like you’re in Shoji Tabuchis’ bathroom in Branson. Lace curtains, ornately framed grandchildren’s artwork, an old mirror, and a rug on the floor complete our look. Early fixtures remain. Our ancestors smartly knew a cabinet on the wall kept toilet paper safe from mice. Not sure if a punched tin can holding moth balls kept critters or the stench away. Either way, it’s worth a try. Outside sits a tree stump wiht an old canoe seat back. Sometimes you have to wait your turn -- it’s a one-holer. A removable shutter is on the front door with painted instructions to hang below off season. A twig wreath completes the shabby-chic look. Our grandchildren would sure appreciate sweet smells from some of your potpourri.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
We have a camp in Bancfroft, Maine. Our old one was in bad shape. Each time I went for a 4-wheeler ride, I would look for cedar logs laying on side of the woods roads. That took about a year to do that, then I started to build. Another 2-3 years went by and my brother threatened to burn down what I had made, so I got help and finished it. We put power to the outhouse for lights and heat that we can turn on inside of camp. Now everyone loves the new/old outhouse.
These photos are the outhouse at my parent’s camp at Spring River lake in Township 10. It was built about 50 years ago by my father.
When I was very young, my family spent most summers there enjoying camp life, swimming in the lake and exploring outside in the woods.
One thing we didn’t always enjoy was having to use the outhouse! But my parents spent time keeping it nice and clean as you can keep an outhouse. They always painted it inside and out, hung up animal photos on the wall, and hung curtains in the windows and kept it clean from spider webs and bugs. Their efforts made a trip to the outhouse less uncomfortable. It is one of the best!
These photos are the outhouse at my parent’s camp at Spring River lake in Township 10. It was built about 50 years ago by my father. When I was very young, my family spent most summers there enjoying camp life, swimming in the lake and exploring outside in the woods. One thing we didn’t always enjoy was having to use the outhouse! But my parents spent time keeping it nice and clean as you can keep an outhouse. They always painted it inside and out, hung up animal photos on the wall, and hung curtains in the windows and kept it clean from spider webs and bugs. Their efforts made a trip to the outhouse less uncomfortable. It is one of the best!
These photos are the outhouse at my parent’s camp at Spring River lake in Township 10. It was built about 50 years ago by my father.
When I was very young, my family spent most summers there enjoying camp life, swimming in the lake and exploring outside in the woods.
One thing we didn’t always enjoy was having to use the outhouse! But my parents spent time keeping it nice and clean as you can keep an outhouse. They always painted it inside and out, hung up animal photos on the wall, and hung curtains in the windows and kept it clean from spider webs and bugs. Their efforts made a trip to the outhouse less uncomfortable. It is one of the best!
These photos are the outhouse at my parent’s camp at Spring River lake in Township 10. It was built about 50 years ago by my father. When I was very young, my family spent most summers there enjoying camp life, swimming in the lake and exploring outside in the woods. One thing we didn’t always enjoy was having to use the outhouse! But my parents spent time keeping it nice and clean as you can keep an outhouse. They always painted it inside and out, hung up animal photos on the wall, and hung curtains in the windows and kept it clean from spider webs and bugs. Their efforts made a trip to the outhouse less uncomfortable. It is one of the best!
These photos are the outhouse at my parent’s camp at Spring River lake in Township 10. It was built about 50 years ago by my father.
When I was very young, my family spent most summers there enjoying camp life, swimming in the lake and exploring outside in the woods.
One thing we didn’t always enjoy was having to use the outhouse! But my parents spent time keeping it nice and clean as you can keep an outhouse. They always painted it inside and out, hung up animal photos on the wall, and hung curtains in the windows and kept it clean from spider webs and bugs. Their efforts made a trip to the outhouse less uncomfortable. It is one of the best!
These photos are the outhouse at my parent’s camp at Spring River lake in Township 10. It was built about 50 years ago by my father. When I was very young, my family spent most summers there enjoying camp life, swimming in the lake and exploring outside in the woods. One thing we didn’t always enjoy was having to use the outhouse! But my parents spent time keeping it nice and clean as you can keep an outhouse. They always painted it inside and out, hung up animal photos on the wall, and hung curtains in the windows and kept it clean from spider webs and bugs. Their efforts made a trip to the outhouse less uncomfortable. It is one of the best!
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio.
Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio. Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio.
Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio. Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio.
Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio. Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio.
Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Our outhouse is a recycled ice shanty with aluminum siding for walls. We kept up the recycled theme by using a peaked skylight (yardsale) along the ridge pole, great for light. It has a shingled roof (leftovers from the camp roof), a propane heater (friends donation), puzzle books and the visual art of the walls lined with calendar pictures saved by our family and friends. We change them every year so no one who visits gets bored. In recent years, we have added a catwalk to it for mud season, electricity for lights, and entertainment via radio. Best of all, you don’t need a dime to get in the door.
Enclosed you will find photos of my 1930 outhouse located at 481 McCrillis Corner Rd. in East Wilton, ME. There is one photo of the outhouse taken from the outside at a distance, a shot of the two holes from the inside, and a picture of a 1950 “Ladies Home Journal” cover decorating one wall.
This fine specimen of a two-holer is unusal because the holes are two different sizes and oval rather than round. My interest in outhouse began as a child growing up in Franklin County where my mother and aunt collected poems about outhouses and privies being accustomed to using such structures. I remember their laughter when one of them would find a new poem to add to the collection which I have now inherited. By the way, it’s very important that you know the difference between an outhouse and a privy. A privy is always attached to a house or barn, and an outhouse as the name suggests is out away from the rest of the buildings.
By entering this contest, I am continuing the family tradition of connecting poetry and outhouses by submitting an original poem which I wrote recently to accompany my photographs. Enclosed you will find a Shakespearean sonnet inspired by my very own outhouse and this contest.

A Moment’s Pause

Hand carved seats beyond the door invite
A moment’s pause underneath the pear
Tree. Lonely looking outhouse sitting right
Beside the orchard still was built with care
For two; a large and small hole, edges round
And smooth from wear and shaped in perfect oval
Form. A child visiting is found
Accompanied by a parent until
The distance from the house is braved alone
Or with an older sibling well aware
Of dangers in the night and over grown
Thistles off the path, if one should dare
To stray. Users of an outhouse have known
Adventure and solace rarely learned in town.
Enclosed you will find photos of my 1930 outhouse located at 481 McCrillis Corner Rd. in East Wilton, ME. There is one photo of the outhouse taken from the outside at a distance, a shot of the two holes from the inside, and a picture of a 1950 “Ladies Home Journal” cover decorating one wall. This fine specimen of a two-holer is unusal because the holes are two different sizes and oval rather than round. My interest in outhouse began as a child growing up in Franklin County where my mother and aunt collected poems about outhouses and privies being accustomed to using such structures. I remember their laughter when one of them would find a new poem to add to the collection which I have now inherited. By the way, it’s very important that you know the difference between an outhouse and a privy. A privy is always attached to a house or barn, and an outhouse as the name suggests is out away from the rest of the buildings. By entering this contest, I am continuing the family tradition of connecting poetry and outhouses by submitting an original poem which I wrote recently to accompany my photographs. Enclosed you will find a Shakespearean sonnet inspired by my very own outhouse and this contest. A Moment’s Pause Hand carved seats beyond the door invite A moment’s pause underneath the pear Tree. Lonely looking outhouse sitting right Beside the orchard still was built with care For two; a large and small hole, edges round And smooth from wear and shaped in perfect oval Form. A child visiting is found Accompanied by a parent until The distance from the house is braved alone Or with an older sibling well aware Of dangers in the night and over grown Thistles off the path, if one should dare To stray. Users of an outhouse have known Adventure and solace rarely learned in town.
Enclosed you will find photos of my 1930 outhouse located at 481 McCrillis Corner Rd. in East Wilton, ME. There is one photo of the outhouse taken from the outside at a distance, a shot of the two holes from the inside, and a picture of a 1950 “Ladies Home Journal” cover decorating one wall.
This fine specimen of a two-holer is unusal because the holes are two different sizes and oval rather than round. My interest in outhouse began as a child growing up in Franklin County where my mother and aunt collected poems about outhouses and privies being accustomed to using such structures. I remember their laughter when one of them would find a new poem to add to the collection which I have now inherited. By the way, it’s very important that you know the difference between an outhouse and a privy. A privy is always attached to a house or barn, and an outhouse as the name suggests is out away from the rest of the buildings.
By entering this contest, I am continuing the family tradition of connecting poetry and outhouses by submitting an original poem which I wrote recently to accompany my photographs. Enclosed you will find a Shakespearean sonnet inspired by my very own outhouse and this contest.

A Moment’s Pause

Hand carved seats beyond the door invite
A moment’s pause underneath the pear
Tree. Lonely looking outhouse sitting right
Beside the orchard still was built with care
For two; a large and small hole, edges round
And smooth from wear and shaped in perfect oval
Form. A child visiting is found
Accompanied by a parent until
The distance from the house is braved alone
Or with an older sibling well aware
Of dangers in the night and over grown
Thistles off the path, if one should dare
To stray. Users of an outhouse have known
Adventure and solace rarely learned in town.
Enclosed you will find photos of my 1930 outhouse located at 481 McCrillis Corner Rd. in East Wilton, ME. There is one photo of the outhouse taken from the outside at a distance, a shot of the two holes from the inside, and a picture of a 1950 “Ladies Home Journal” cover decorating one wall. This fine specimen of a two-holer is unusal because the holes are two different sizes and oval rather than round. My interest in outhouse began as a child growing up in Franklin County where my mother and aunt collected poems about outhouses and privies being accustomed to using such structures. I remember their laughter when one of them would find a new poem to add to the collection which I have now inherited. By the way, it’s very important that you know the difference between an outhouse and a privy. A privy is always attached to a house or barn, and an outhouse as the name suggests is out away from the rest of the buildings. By entering this contest, I am continuing the family tradition of connecting poetry and outhouses by submitting an original poem which I wrote recently to accompany my photographs. Enclosed you will find a Shakespearean sonnet inspired by my very own outhouse and this contest. A Moment’s Pause Hand carved seats beyond the door invite A moment’s pause underneath the pear Tree. Lonely looking outhouse sitting right Beside the orchard still was built with care For two; a large and small hole, edges round And smooth from wear and shaped in perfect oval Form. A child visiting is found Accompanied by a parent until The distance from the house is braved alone Or with an older sibling well aware Of dangers in the night and over grown Thistles off the path, if one should dare To stray. Users of an outhouse have known Adventure and solace rarely learned in town.
Enclosed you will find photos of my 1930 outhouse located at 481 McCrillis Corner Rd. in East Wilton, ME. There is one photo of the outhouse taken from the outside at a distance, a shot of the two holes from the inside, and a picture of a 1950 “Ladies Home Journal” cover decorating one wall.
This fine specimen of a two-holer is unusal because the holes are two different sizes and oval rather than round. My interest in outhouse began as a child growing up in Franklin County where my mother and aunt collected poems about outhouses and privies being accustomed to using such structures. I remember their laughter when one of them would find a new poem to add to the collection which I have now inherited. By the way, it’s very important that you know the difference between an outhouse and a privy. A privy is always attached to a house or barn, and an outhouse as the name suggests is out away from the rest of the buildings.
By entering this contest, I am continuing the family tradition of connecting poetry and outhouses by submitting an original poem which I wrote recently to accompany my photographs. Enclosed you will find a Shakespearean sonnet inspired by my very own outhouse and this contest.

A Moment’s Pause

Hand carved seats beyond the door invite
A moment’s pause underneath the pear
Tree. Lonely looking outhouse sitting right
Beside the orchard still was built with care
For two; a large and small hole, edges round
And smooth from wear and shaped in perfect oval
Form. A child visiting is found
Accompanied by a parent until
The distance from the house is braved alone
Or with an older sibling well aware
Of dangers in the night and over grown
Thistles off the path, if one should dare
To stray. Users of an outhouse have known
Adventure and solace rarely learned in town.
Enclosed you will find photos of my 1930 outhouse located at 481 McCrillis Corner Rd. in East Wilton, ME. There is one photo of the outhouse taken from the outside at a distance, a shot of the two holes from the inside, and a picture of a 1950 “Ladies Home Journal” cover decorating one wall. This fine specimen of a two-holer is unusal because the holes are two different sizes and oval rather than round. My interest in outhouse began as a child growing up in Franklin County where my mother and aunt collected poems about outhouses and privies being accustomed to using such structures. I remember their laughter when one of them would find a new poem to add to the collection which I have now inherited. By the way, it’s very important that you know the difference between an outhouse and a privy. A privy is always attached to a house or barn, and an outhouse as the name suggests is out away from the rest of the buildings. By entering this contest, I am continuing the family tradition of connecting poetry and outhouses by submitting an original poem which I wrote recently to accompany my photographs. Enclosed you will find a Shakespearean sonnet inspired by my very own outhouse and this contest. A Moment’s Pause Hand carved seats beyond the door invite A moment’s pause underneath the pear Tree. Lonely looking outhouse sitting right Beside the orchard still was built with care For two; a large and small hole, edges round And smooth from wear and shaped in perfect oval Form. A child visiting is found Accompanied by a parent until The distance from the house is braved alone Or with an older sibling well aware Of dangers in the night and over grown Thistles off the path, if one should dare To stray. Users of an outhouse have known Adventure and solace rarely learned in town.
In my neck of the woods an outhouse is a good idea. It was a good idea before I had a well and running water. And it is still a good idea when power outages occur, most common in winter months. It is a one-holer. Never could understand multi-seaters. The bench seat is a two inches thick foam insulation board, which is never cold to the touch. I’ve found that aromatic eucalyptus keeps the spiders away, so there are many bouquets of it inside. And my furry, four-legged friend Yaryu (now deceased) was in change of quality control. Notice the “out-shower,” another downeast summer necessity.
In my neck of the woods an outhouse is a good idea. It was a good idea before I had a well and running water. And it is still a good idea when power outages occur, most common in winter months. It is a one-holer. Never could understand multi-seaters. The bench seat is a two inches thick foam insulation board, which is never cold to the touch. I’ve found that aromatic eucalyptus keeps the spiders away, so there are many bouquets of it inside. And my furry, four-legged friend Yaryu (now deceased) was in change of quality control. Notice the “out-shower,” another downeast summer necessity.
In my neck of the woods an outhouse is a good idea. It was a good idea before I had a well and running water. And it is still a good idea when power outages occur, most common in winter months. It is a one-holer. Never could understand multi-seaters. The bench seat is a two inches thick foam insulation board, which is never cold to the touch. I’ve found that aromatic eucalyptus keeps the spiders away, so there are many bouquets of it inside. And my furry, four-legged friend Yaryu (now deceased) was in change of quality control. Notice the “out-shower,” another downeast summer necessity.
In my neck of the woods an outhouse is a good idea. It was a good idea before I had a well and running water. And it is still a good idea when power outages occur, most common in winter months. It is a one-holer. Never could understand multi-seaters. The bench seat is a two inches thick foam insulation board, which is never cold to the touch. I’ve found that aromatic eucalyptus keeps the spiders away, so there are many bouquets of it inside. And my furry, four-legged friend Yaryu (now deceased) was in change of quality control. Notice the “out-shower,” another downeast summer necessity.
In my neck of the woods an outhouse is a good idea. It was a good idea before I had a well and running water. And it is still a good idea when power outages occur, most common in winter months. It is a one-holer. Never could understand multi-seaters. The bench seat is a two inches thick foam insulation board, which is never cold to the touch. I’ve found that aromatic eucalyptus keeps the spiders away, so there are many bouquets of it inside. And my furry, four-legged friend Yaryu (now deceased) was in change of quality control. Notice the “out-shower,” another downeast summer necessity.
In my neck of the woods an outhouse is a good idea. It was a good idea before I had a well and running water. And it is still a good idea when power outages occur, most common in winter months. It is a one-holer. Never could understand multi-seaters. The bench seat is a two inches thick foam insulation board, which is never cold to the touch. I’ve found that aromatic eucalyptus keeps the spiders away, so there are many bouquets of it inside. And my furry, four-legged friend Yaryu (now deceased) was in change of quality control. Notice the “out-shower,” another downeast summer necessity.
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you?
Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you? Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you?
Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you? Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you?
Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
Richard V. Wood
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you? Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you?
Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
Richard V. Wood
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you? Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you?
Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
Richard V. Wood
We purchased our camp with outhouse some thirty years ago on the Upper Narrows of Cold Stream Pond. One of the first projects was to panel with pine the entire inside of the outhouse. Afterwards I built a fine vanity table and chair for those that may want to freshen up on the way out. Additionally, there is ample reading material provided for those that might like to linger a while. There are two windows, one on the North side and one on the South which allow excellent cross-ventilation and which I think it necessary in an outhouse, don’t you? Our outhouse has provided our family with excellent service over those thirty years except for one day on a cold February afternoon. We were having a family day of ice fishing at camp when my brother Brent had a sudden attack of the runs. He ran for the outhouse and, in anticipation of relief on the throne, he dropped his pants as he reached for the door but alas, the door was frozen shut! The ice fishing wasn’t all that great either!
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME
A Legend in Its Own Right
This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter.
“Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Bruce P. Leavitt
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME A Legend in Its Own Right This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter. “Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME
A Legend in Its Own Right
This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter.
“Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Bruce P. Leavitt
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME A Legend in Its Own Right This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter. “Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME
A Legend in Its Own Right
This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter.
“Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Bruce P. Leavitt
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME A Legend in Its Own Right This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter. “Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME
A Legend in Its Own Right
This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter.
“Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Bruce P. Leavitt
Outhouse is at camp, Plunkett Pond, Bennedicta, ME A Legend in Its Own Right This is the ultimate- an outhouse with charm and sophistication. Picture Humphrey Bogart dresses in his tux and holding a glass of wine. Round out the image with all the necessary amenities: the flowers, the wine, the Bogie salutation. And beyond that add the ultimate in comfort: an interchangeable seat. Cool, sleek wood in summer; heated styrofoam in winter. “Here’s looking at you, kid.”
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why.
When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it.
Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!!
Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
Lisa Holmes
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why. When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it. Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!! Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why.
When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it.
Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!!
Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
Lisa Holmes
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why. When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it. Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!! Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why.
When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it.
Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!!
Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
Lisa Holmes
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why. When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it. Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!! Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why.
When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it.
Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!!
Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
Lisa Holmes
Enclosed you will find some pictures of our outhouse on Sebec River. I never really thought much about it being that special, other than my husband and other family members helping to build it. But, about a month ago that changed and I’ll tell you why. When I was about fifteen years old my mom gave me an opal ring that I absolutely loved, it was special because it had been handed down to me from my great-great grandmother! We were all up to camp and one day I looked down and the stone was gone. I was so upset and looked everywhere, to no avail, I didn’t tell my Mom and she never asked about it. Well, about a month ago my husband and I were up to camp having our morning coffee on the porch over looking the river, it was a gorgeous morning and he had to make a nature call (you know what I mean). When he came back he laid something on the porch table. I didn’t have a clue what it was, until I put my glasses on!!! I couldn’t believe my eyes, it was the opal I had been missing for thirty-five years!!! I know, who would have thought it would turn up after all these years and still intact!!! Well, that’s my story and that is why I think our outhouse is pretty special. Thank you for taking the time to read my story.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive.
During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out.
Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests.
With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive. During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out. Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests. With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive.
During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out.
Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests.
With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive. During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out. Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests. With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive.
During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out.
Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests.
With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive. During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out. Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests. With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive.
During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out.
Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests.
With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
I am an outhouse located at Beech Hill Pond. I have had three owners over the years. I was born in 1950 on the West Shore Road and have had many good years. There are many attributes that make me a unique outhouse. I am able to host two users at the same time, I have electricity, I am painted and decorated, and now I have a new tiled floor. But I have not always been so impressive. During my life with my second owner, I began to deteriorate. I need a new skirt, new paint, roof work, and most of all a new floor. On the 4th of July celebrations of 2000, I was hosting two users. When they were doing their thing, my floor gave way and the larger of the two woman dropped six feet to the bottom of the outhouse. It required a ladder to get her out. Needless to say, the lady never returned to visit me and shortly after this traumatic event the camp was sold to the current owners. They have turned me around and given me a second life. I now have new paint inside and out, a new skirt, better lighting and most importantly a new floor to host my guests. With my second chance of life I feel I am one of the best outhouses out there. I have many friends on Beech Hill Pond, and I am by far the most attractive outhouse of them all.
Our outhouse was completed the summer of 1965. Pictured is the original outhouse on the original spot. All materials were gathered from the dump. The original color was tin. We have “spruced it up” with brown and green.
Notice the fence. Our rich Connecticut lawyer neighbors wanted a piece of rustic northern Maine. not for long. They spent a couple of hundred thousand dollars modernizing the rustic camp next door into a palace. They detested our outhouse so they put up a fence. True northern Mainers have kept their outhouse (even though we have inside plumbing) as a tribute to a kinder and more neighborly time of years gone by.
Our outhouse was completed the summer of 1965. Pictured is the original outhouse on the original spot. All materials were gathered from the dump. The original color was tin. We have “spruced it up” with brown and green. Notice the fence. Our rich Connecticut lawyer neighbors wanted a piece of rustic northern Maine. not for long. They spent a couple of hundred thousand dollars modernizing the rustic camp next door into a palace. They detested our outhouse so they put up a fence. True northern Mainers have kept their outhouse (even though we have inside plumbing) as a tribute to a kinder and more neighborly time of years gone by.
Our outhouse was completed the summer of 1965. Pictured is the original outhouse on the original spot. All materials were gathered from the dump. The original color was tin. We have “spruced it up” with brown and green.
Notice the fence. Our rich Connecticut lawyer neighbors wanted a piece of rustic northern Maine. not for long. They spent a couple of hundred thousand dollars modernizing the rustic camp next door into a palace. They detested our outhouse so they put up a fence. True northern Mainers have kept their outhouse (even though we have inside plumbing) as a tribute to a kinder and more neighborly time of years gone by.
Our outhouse was completed the summer of 1965. Pictured is the original outhouse on the original spot. All materials were gathered from the dump. The original color was tin. We have “spruced it up” with brown and green. Notice the fence. Our rich Connecticut lawyer neighbors wanted a piece of rustic northern Maine. not for long. They spent a couple of hundred thousand dollars modernizing the rustic camp next door into a palace. They detested our outhouse so they put up a fence. True northern Mainers have kept their outhouse (even though we have inside plumbing) as a tribute to a kinder and more neighborly time of years gone by.
Our outhouse was completed the summer of 1965. Pictured is the original outhouse on the original spot. All materials were gathered from the dump. The original color was tin. We have “spruced it up” with brown and green.
Notice the fence. Our rich Connecticut lawyer neighbors wanted a piece of rustic northern Maine. not for long. They spent a couple of hundred thousand dollars modernizing the rustic camp next door into a palace. They detested our outhouse so they put up a fence. True northern Mainers have kept their outhouse (even though we have inside plumbing) as a tribute to a kinder and more neighborly time of years gone by.
Our outhouse was completed the summer of 1965. Pictured is the original outhouse on the original spot. All materials were gathered from the dump. The original color was tin. We have “spruced it up” with brown and green. Notice the fence. Our rich Connecticut lawyer neighbors wanted a piece of rustic northern Maine. not for long. They spent a couple of hundred thousand dollars modernizing the rustic camp next door into a palace. They detested our outhouse so they put up a fence. True northern Mainers have kept their outhouse (even though we have inside plumbing) as a tribute to a kinder and more neighborly time of years gone by.
Maul
Lincoln
Built in 1953 along with a one room log cabin by my folks, they used it for hunting and vacation. Located on Saponac Pond in Grand Falls, my wife and I still use the property today. I took the liberty of updating the outhouse last year. Along with a ramp to make access easier for us old folks, it also has electricity. Built of rough sawn pine board construction, I covered the outside with cedar shingles which also leaves the interior with a pleasant cedar aroma. A small electric heater is also used for those extended visits on cool mornings. We, too, have a framed copy of the poem “The Passing of the Backhouse” hanging on the wall.
Maul Lincoln Built in 1953 along with a one room log cabin by my folks, they used it for hunting and vacation. Located on Saponac Pond in Grand Falls, my wife and I still use the property today. I took the liberty of updating the outhouse last year. Along with a ramp to make access easier for us old folks, it also has electricity. Built of rough sawn pine board construction, I covered the outside with cedar shingles which also leaves the interior with a pleasant cedar aroma. A small electric heater is also used for those extended visits on cool mornings. We, too, have a framed copy of the poem “The Passing of the Backhouse” hanging on the wall.
Maul
Lincoln
Built in 1953 along with a one room log cabin by my folks, they used it for hunting and vacation. Located on Saponac Pond in Grand Falls, my wife and I still use the property today. I took the liberty of updating the outhouse last year. Along with a ramp to make access easier for us old folks, it also has electricity. Built of rough sawn pine board construction, I covered the outside with cedar shingles which also leaves the interior with a pleasant cedar aroma. A small electric heater is also used for those extended visits on cool mornings. We, too, have a framed copy of the poem “The Passing of the Backhouse” hanging on the wall.
Maul Lincoln Built in 1953 along with a one room log cabin by my folks, they used it for hunting and vacation. Located on Saponac Pond in Grand Falls, my wife and I still use the property today. I took the liberty of updating the outhouse last year. Along with a ramp to make access easier for us old folks, it also has electricity. Built of rough sawn pine board construction, I covered the outside with cedar shingles which also leaves the interior with a pleasant cedar aroma. A small electric heater is also used for those extended visits on cool mornings. We, too, have a framed copy of the poem “The Passing of the Backhouse” hanging on the wall.
Built in 1953 along with a one room log cabin by my folks, they used it for hunting and vacation. Located on Saponac Pond in Grand Falls, my wife and I still use the property today. I took the liberty of updating the outhouse last year. Along with a ramp to make access easier for us old folks, it also has electricity. Built of rough sawn pine board construction, I covered the outside with cedar shingles which also leaves the interior with a pleasant cedar aroma. A small electric heater is also used for those extended visits on cool mornings. We, too, have a framed copy of the poem “The Passing of the Backhouse” hanging on the wall.
Built in 1953 along with a one room log cabin by my folks, they used it for hunting and vacation. Located on Saponac Pond in Grand Falls, my wife and I still use the property today. I took the liberty of updating the outhouse last year. Along with a ramp to make access easier for us old folks, it also has electricity. Built of rough sawn pine board construction, I covered the outside with cedar shingles which also leaves the interior with a pleasant cedar aroma. A small electric heater is also used for those extended visits on cool mornings. We, too, have a framed copy of the poem “The Passing of the Backhouse” hanging on the wall.
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Bruce and Linda Gothrow
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Bruce and Linda Gothrow
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Bruce and Linda Gothrow
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Bruce and Linda Gothrow
Bruce and Gothrow of Bangor, created this lighthouse themed outhouse a few years ago at their camp at Brandy Pond in Hancock County. He built it to surprise his wife Linda on her return from a trip to Florida. Linda, as you can tell from the photos is a fan of lighthouses. There is a lighthouse on the toilet seat cover, on the back wall and on the door, which also has a fire alarm. A carpeted throne and vinyl flooring complete the interior. The red light atop the structure and the lighthouse lamp below are solar powered, as are the lights lining the walkway to the facility.
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine.
The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience!  Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. 
Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Gretchen Mourtgos
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine. The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience! Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine.
The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience!  Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. 
Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Gretchen Mourtgos
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine. The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience! Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine.
The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience!  Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. 
Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Gretchen Mourtgos
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine. The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience! Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine.
The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience!  Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. 
Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Gretchen Mourtgos
Gretchen Mourtgos of West Valley City, Utah, says, “Our love affair with an outhouse began in 1965 when my parents bought a small camp on Pennamaquan Lake in Charlotte, Maine. The one-seater outhouse had been built in the 50’s, so it was still in good shape. We painted it green, to blend in with the trees, and I painted a yellow honey bee and a hive on the front of the door. My mother always called an outhouse a “honey house” (because it smelled so good???), so being a kid I thought it would be fun to paint the “bee” motif on the front. Fast-forward to 1990. Now married, I was spending a month at the camp with my 4 children, ages 6-10. The old outhouse was starting to look a little shabby, so the kids and I decided to take on the project of rehabilitating it. My second oldest son, who was really into Snoopy, thought it would be a good idea to paint the outhouse to look like Snoopy’s doghouse. All agreed, since none of us had a better idea. We bought paint and brushes at the hardware store in Eastport and got to work. As you can see, Snoopy is on the side with a bowl of food. The sign hanging on the front door says “Home, Sweet Home”. To add a little feminine flair to the mix, the inside was painted a soothing lavender. This made the dark brown plastic toilet seat stand out as the focal point of the interior! The brown plastic seat replaced the old white wooden one in 1970’s because the old one had a crack in it that kept pinching our legs when we sat down on it! Several years ago when my parents were in their late seventies they decided to add a “real” bathroom onto the camp. This made it necessary to move Snoopy’s Place further back into the woods so there would be room for the new septic system. Luckily we were “grandfathered in” and were able to legally do this. We attached 2 x 4 handles onto the sides of the outhouse to make it easier to move. For those of you who have never moved an outhouse, it is hard work and an interesting experience! Several times over the years my Dad and I have re-painted the old place. It doesn’t look as good as when I painted it with the kids, but it is still presentable. It is leaning a little further back than it used to and an animal has chewed off the bottom corner of the door during last winter. I’ll have to see if my husband can patch the hole when we are there this year. Many generations of “Charlotte” wolf spiders have spun their webs in the corner of the screened window and scared our kids as they raised their hairy legs in a frightening spider stance when we entered to use the facilities.
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Chuck Kishman
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Chuck Kishman
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Chuck Kishman
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Chuck Kishman
Chuck Kishman of Conklin, Mich., says, "My outhouse was built out of unemployement and boredom!! Its constructed of old tongue and groove siding from an old out building that was on the farm years ago. Every piece of material was found around the property, from the wood to the nails. I invested not one cent! It was alot of fun to build, and it looks like it has been there for ever."
Richard Sabean of Lakeville said "It's out standing in the woods. This was home-built with a chainsaw. It's been in consistent use, summer and winter, for over a decade, and is still a comfort to all who visit."
Richard Sabean
Richard Sabean of Lakeville said "It's out standing in the woods. This was home-built with a chainsaw. It's been in consistent use, summer and winter, for over a decade, and is still a comfort to all who visit."
Kathy Witham, Milo, began the saga of her favorite house thusly: "It was Labor Day weekend, September 1959. We were packed and ready to spend our first weekend in our brand new camp on the west shore of Schoodic Lake. Dad and his friend Earl Sharrow, a local carpenter, had worked all summer felling trees to clear the
Kathy Witham
Kathy Witham, Milo, began the saga of her favorite house thusly: "It was Labor Day weekend, September 1959. We were packed and ready to spend our first weekend in our brand new camp on the west shore of Schoodic Lake. Dad and his friend Earl Sharrow, a local carpenter, had worked all summer felling trees to clear the
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley
Conrad and Yolanda Bulley of MIllinocket say their two-hole Frog Pond outhouse is an original, it’s attractive, comfortable and easy to maintain. The Dutch door eliminates the need for a window and provides plenty of light. The green stain, the style and variety of frog accessories, make for a pleasant visual experience. Regular lime treatments and multiple fine potpourri offerings, coupled with a discreet ventilation system provide enjoyable olfactory use in the facility. And facility is a never-needs-to-be-emptied comfort station. The hole was excavated by a backhoe and was 6 feet deep so don’t fall in, they advise. On top of all that, the Frog Pond has one of the best cell phone reception signals in the area of Ambajejus Lake.
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt
Bill and Marty Leavitt of Northport said they are proud of their outhouse and it is decorated well. “It carries on the tradition of relief in the woods. Our outhouse was built at Tanglewood 4-H Camp and Learning Center in Lincolnville. It has been on our land, in use, in Northport for more than 20 years. It is used for children coming to learn about the Maine landscape. It is used by school programs, campers and Boy Scouts. Our outhouse is located on PP Lane (porta-pottie even though it is not a porta-pottie) with Tinkle Ridge close by.”
Bill and Marty Leavitt
Bill and Marty Leavitt
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
Berwyn Peasley
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
Berwyn Peasley
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
Berwyn Peasley
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
Berwyn Peasley
This outhouse, said Berwyn Peasley of Brooksville, was made from scrap lumber, boarded and batted like the old times. “The toilet seat was a three-holer, used int he Penobscot Town Hall (1901) many years ago. We cut it to make a two-holer because the other had rotted away. Real pleasure to set on. It was built for comfort not speed.The door hendle was made from a spruce limb.the curtain made from burlap for security. The outhouse is located at the Penobscot Historical Society, between the schoolhouse and the main house.”
Edith Kinney of Limestone says her bathroom is decorated with pictures taken locally of outhouses she took while driving around Aroostook County and New Brunswick, Canada. Some are fancy, some funny and some very old and tired. This outhouse belongs to her neighbor who used it years ago for a couple of families from Quebec, Canada, who came every fall to pick potatoes on his farm.
Edith Kinney, Limestone
Edith Kinney of Limestone says her bathroom is decorated with pictures taken locally of outhouses she took while driving around Aroostook County and New Brunswick, Canada. Some are fancy, some funny and some very old and tired. This outhouse belongs to her neighbor who used it years ago for a couple of families from Quebec, Canada, who came every fall to pick potatoes on his farm.
The Blue Hill ‘Loo’ is an inviting and genuine relic from a by-gone era. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the late 60’s, its usefulness changed. The outhouses (originally there were two-side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses.

During a Nor’easter in the 90’s, one back house was completely demolished by a huge falling spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad, we've lovingly preserved this last one as a great reminder of what living was like on our 1869 farm property so many ‘moons‘ ago.

My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it and to really appreciate the stained-glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit.

Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site 'Blue Hill Loo' (it's inside). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends in the summer. The children’s (and adult) giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming!

We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread ends and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life.

Not familiar with Geocaching? Check out the website www.geocaching.com. It’s a great way to get kids “Out There” and its educational, as well.
Diane Smith, Blue Hill
The Blue Hill ‘Loo’ is an inviting and genuine relic from a by-gone era. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the late 60’s, its usefulness changed. The outhouses (originally there were two-side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses. During a Nor’easter in the 90’s, one back house was completely demolished by a huge falling spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad, we've lovingly preserved this last one as a great reminder of what living was like on our 1869 farm property so many ‘moons‘ ago. My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it and to really appreciate the stained-glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit. Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site 'Blue Hill Loo' (it's inside). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends in the summer. The children’s (and adult) giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming! We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread ends and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life. Not familiar with Geocaching? Check out the website www.geocaching.com. It’s a great way to get kids “Out There” and its educational, as well.
The Blue Hill ‘Loo’ is an inviting and genuine relic from a by-gone era. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the late 60’s, its usefulness changed. The outhouses (originally there were two-side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses.

During a Nor’easter in the 90’s, one back house was completely demolished by a huge falling spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad, we've lovingly preserved this last one as a great reminder of what living was like on our 1869 farm property so many ‘moons‘ ago.

My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it and to really appreciate the stained-glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit.

Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site 'Blue Hill Loo' (it's inside). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends in the summer. The children’s (and adult) giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming!

We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread ends and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life.

Not familiar with Geocaching? Check out the website www.geocaching.com. It’s a great way to get kids “Out There” and its educational, as well.
Diane Smith, Blue Hill
The Blue Hill ‘Loo’ is an inviting and genuine relic from a by-gone era. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the late 60’s, its usefulness changed. The outhouses (originally there were two-side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses. During a Nor’easter in the 90’s, one back house was completely demolished by a huge falling spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad, we've lovingly preserved this last one as a great reminder of what living was like on our 1869 farm property so many ‘moons‘ ago. My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it and to really appreciate the stained-glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit. Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site 'Blue Hill Loo' (it's inside). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends in the summer. The children’s (and adult) giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming! We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread ends and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life. Not familiar with Geocaching? Check out the website www.geocaching.com. It’s a great way to get kids “Out There” and its educational, as well.
The Blue Hill ‘Loo’ is an inviting and genuine relic from a by-gone era. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the late 60’s, its usefulness changed. The outhouses (originally there were two-side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses.

During a Nor’easter in the 90’s, one back house was completely demolished by a huge falling spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad, we've lovingly preserved this last one as a great reminder of what living was like on our 1869 farm property so many ‘moons‘ ago.

My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it and to really appreciate the stained-glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit.

Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site 'Blue Hill Loo' (it's inside). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends in the summer. The children’s (and adult) giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming!

We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread ends and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life.

Not familiar with Geocaching? Check out the website www.geocaching.com. It’s a great way to get kids “Out There” and its educational, as well.
Diane Smith, Blue Hill
The Blue Hill ‘Loo’ is an inviting and genuine relic from a by-gone era. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the late 60’s, its usefulness changed. The outhouses (originally there were two-side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses. During a Nor’easter in the 90’s, one back house was completely demolished by a huge falling spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad, we've lovingly preserved this last one as a great reminder of what living was like on our 1869 farm property so many ‘moons‘ ago. My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it and to really appreciate the stained-glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit. Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site 'Blue Hill Loo' (it's inside). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends in the summer. The children’s (and adult) giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming! We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread ends and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life. Not familiar with Geocaching? Check out the website www.geocaching.com. It’s a great way to get kids “Out There” and its educational, as well.
Many outhouses built during the Victorian Era were still in use when conventional indoor plumbing made it's mark in the early 1900's. I built ours using the distinctive style of those times. It looks very at home out in the field and has been a joy to use as we built our house.
Quentin Young, Sedgwick
Many outhouses built during the Victorian Era were still in use when conventional indoor plumbing made it's mark in the early 1900's. I built ours using the distinctive style of those times. It looks very at home out in the field and has been a joy to use as we built our house.
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
David McLean
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
David McLean
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
David McLean
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
David McLean
Our little "powder room" sits on 17 Round Pond Road in Charlotte, Maine. I built what I considered to be an outhouse, but my wife insisted that it would be referred as the "powder room." My wife painted a "For Rent" sign on it last summer and we actually had people want to rent it! This powder room replaced an old run-down privy. We are very proud of our outhouse and it serves us well when we are enjoying our camp on beautiful Round Pond in DownEast Maine!
Ervin Marston of Bangor said this is a picture of “our outhouse on Millinocket. After 50 years of havinga two-holer we have converted to a one-holer which is almost like our one at home except no flushing. It is also a convenient height off the floor for the over 70 folks. As you can see the Reader’s Digest is our book of choice with short stories. The unique thing about our outhouse is we have a big window that we can enjoy a beautiful view of Mt. Katahdin while doing our business.
Ervin Marston
Ervin Marston of Bangor said this is a picture of “our outhouse on Millinocket. After 50 years of havinga two-holer we have converted to a one-holer which is almost like our one at home except no flushing. It is also a convenient height off the floor for the over 70 folks. As you can see the Reader’s Digest is our book of choice with short stories. The unique thing about our outhouse is we have a big window that we can enjoy a beautiful view of Mt. Katahdin while doing our business.
Ervin Marston of Bangor said this is a picture of “our outhouse on Millinocket. After 50 years of havinga two-holer we have converted to a one-holer which is almost like our one at home except no flushing. It is also a convenient height off the floor for the over 70 folks. As you can see the Reader’s Digest is our book of choice with short stories. The unique thing about our outhouse is we have a big window that we can enjoy a beautiful view of Mt. Katahdin while doing our business.
Ervin Marston
Ervin Marston of Bangor said this is a picture of “our outhouse on Millinocket. After 50 years of havinga two-holer we have converted to a one-holer which is almost like our one at home except no flushing. It is also a convenient height off the floor for the over 70 folks. As you can see the Reader’s Digest is our book of choice with short stories. The unique thing about our outhouse is we have a big window that we can enjoy a beautiful view of Mt. Katahdin while doing our business.
Gerald Bilodeau of Belfast says “my ‘en plein air’ throne is located on the banks of Pushaw Stream. The seat is padded with moss for soft and cool seating.”
Gerald Billdeau
Gerald Bilodeau of Belfast says “my ‘en plein air’ throne is located on the banks of Pushaw Stream. The seat is padded with moss for soft and cool seating.”
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
Raymond Fournier
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
Raymond Fournier
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
Raymond Fournier
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
Raymond Fournier
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
Raymond Fournier
When I was building my camp 50 years ago, said Raymond Fournier of Otis, I had a temporary outhouse made with a recycled Air Force locker from Dow Airfield in Bangor. It was so small we were forced to back in with our pants already down. Everyone made so much fun of it that I said, “the next outhouse I build will be a classic.” Some people refer to their outhouse as the throne, so mine is definitely one. I used an antique potty chair and cut the legs off and set it on a form that you have to step up to. Dried flowers are draped from columns with a scepter mounted within reach befitting a throne. Also a French boudoir working telephone and $100 bills toilet paper add some class. Multicolored carpet squares cover the walls. The windows are ersatz stained glass for privacy. It also is lighted with a crystal chandelier that hangs from a beamed ceiling. Electric baseboard heat maintains comfort during cold weather when the water is turned off. There is an almost life-sized queen’s guard in full uniform that stands sentry duty in his own small building next to the loo. My family and friends gave me an outhouse warming when it was finished. I especially like the sign that reads “this is a high class place, act respectable.” For many years friends from surrounding camps would come and have their picture taken, some still do. When they come I put on my throne cap that a friend had made special for me. Many visitors have sent me photocopies of themselves sitting on the throne.
It is "au natural", a completely unexpected find in the middle of nowhere, says Michelle Anderson of Presque Isle.
Michelle Anderson
It is "au natural", a completely unexpected find in the middle of nowhere, says Michelle Anderson of Presque Isle.
It is "au natural", a completely unexpected find in the middle of nowhere, says Michelle Anderson of Presque Isle.
Michelle Anderson
It is "au natural", a completely unexpected find in the middle of nowhere, says Michelle Anderson of Presque Isle.
Rustic but Royal. 
Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Beverly Campbell, Waterville
Rustic but Royal. Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Rustic but Royal. 
Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Beverly Campbell, Waterville
Rustic but Royal. Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Rustic but Royal. 
Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Beverly Campbell, Waterville
Rustic but Royal. Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Rustic but Royal. 
Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Beverly Campbell, Waterville
Rustic but Royal. Fit for the "Dairy-ere" of a King. Built in 2008 with scrap wood by my brother and I. The windows are translucent pictures of French flowers with candle stick lights in each that flicker in the dark. It is also my wood shed that houses the wood for the Dover Stove to keep the camp warm and comfy when there is achill in the air.
Our outhouse is unique and as the wording screams at the top of the door.
IT SUTS US (ITSUTSUS). The outta 1, is really a well house in disquise. We do not 
like to follow suit and like to be different. So 12 years ago when we built here in Greenbush, our Outhouse/Well-House fit right into the scenery. "ALMOST"
Phillis Clark, Greenbush
Our outhouse is unique and as the wording screams at the top of the door. IT SUTS US (ITSUTSUS). The outta 1, is really a well house in disquise. We do not like to follow suit and like to be different. So 12 years ago when we built here in Greenbush, our Outhouse/Well-House fit right into the scenery. "ALMOST"
Our outhouse is unique and as the wording screams at the top of the door.
IT SUTS US (ITSUTSUS). The outta 1, is really a well house in disquise. We do not 
like to follow suit and like to be different. So 12 years ago when we built here in Greenbush, our Outhouse/Well-House fit right into the scenery. "ALMOST"
Phillis Clark, Greenbush
Our outhouse is unique and as the wording screams at the top of the door. IT SUTS US (ITSUTSUS). The outta 1, is really a well house in disquise. We do not like to follow suit and like to be different. So 12 years ago when we built here in Greenbush, our Outhouse/Well-House fit right into the scenery. "ALMOST"
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
Nina Bohlen, Lubec
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
Nina Bohlen, Lubec
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
Nina Bohlen, Lubec
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
Nina Bohlen, Lubec
This outhouse/studio at 1112 north Lubec Road, was a work in progress, when I read the article about an outhouse competition in the Bangor Daily news. The original building “Wiffle Tree Manor “ was 6'by8'shed ,to which a screened porch had been added. The outhouse was a separate building. Both were in need of repair. What to do? Russell Wright of Lubec ,who did the renovation suggested why not make the shed into an outhouse Special thanks go to Brian Brody. After the round hole was cut in the floor,he dug out the 4'hole,eventually hanging head first into the hole,digging with a garden trowel into a bucket. The porch was finished with plexiglass windows and a screen door. While using this spacious outhouse, you have a three way view,windows on either side in the building or out the open door. The result of this innovative work is a twofer, a spacious outhouse and a mosquito free summer studio. Thank you Russell Wright, Brian Brody and Bud Boomer
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
Frank Ouellette, Bangor
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
Frank Ouellette, Bangor
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
Frank Ouellette, Bangor
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
Frank Ouellette, Bangor
As a father of four daughters and a husband, I live with five women.... Sharing bathrooms with five females, their school friends, their beauty tools and products is, well lets say, challenging. I pride myself in the fact that I do put the toilet seat down but I wanted a bathroom that only "the man of/in the house" could use. No products, no womens fitness / cheerleading magazines, a bathroom for just me. So in the room above our garage came MANLAND. To minimize the temptation to use MY space I installed a urinal in my outhouse and even named my outhouse to be clear on my position. Enjoy.
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Kenneth Bustard, Bucksport
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Kenneth Bustard, Bucksport
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Kenneth Bustard, Bucksport
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Kenneth Bustard, Bucksport
Neighbors have described our outhouse as "best outhouse this side of the Mississippi." It is not uncommon for travelers familiar with it's location ( Rebel Hill, Merrill ) to make a "pit stop" here instead of the local Irving station. We have received "thank yous" from hunters passing by, grateful for it's availability. Our outhouse provides a pleasurable experience for all users. Fresh pine scents, reading material and all the comforts of home.
Our outhouse at Cedar Lake is complete with an antique 'throne'. And, it has a 'potty chair' insert for the grandchildren. We took an antique chair, removed the leather insert, and replace it with a toilet seat. When the grandchildren came to visit, we inserted the 'potty seat' and pushed up the sturdy step Grampy made for them to get to it. 
In the first picture big sister, Baylee, takes little sister, Emma, to the 'Potty Chair Outhouse' first thing in the morning.

The second picture is the 'potty chair' throne.

And the third picture shows the outhouse, affectionately called 'The Changing Room' because many suits were put on and taken off there to keep wet, sandy clothes and feet out of the camp.
Diane Bilodeau
Our outhouse at Cedar Lake is complete with an antique 'throne'. And, it has a 'potty chair' insert for the grandchildren. We took an antique chair, removed the leather insert, and replace it with a toilet seat. When the grandchildren came to visit, we inserted the 'potty seat' and pushed up the sturdy step Grampy made for them to get to it. In the first picture big sister, Baylee, takes little sister, Emma, to the 'Potty Chair Outhouse' first thing in the morning. The second picture is the 'potty chair' throne. And the third picture shows the outhouse, affectionately called 'The Changing Room' because many suits were put on and taken off there to keep wet, sandy clothes and feet out of the camp.
Our outhouse at Cedar Lake is complete with an antique 'throne'. And, it has a 'potty chair' insert for the grandchildren. We took an antique chair, removed the leather insert, and replace it with a toilet seat. When the grandchildren came to visit, we inserted the 'potty seat' and pushed up the sturdy step Grampy made for them to get to it. 
In the first picture big sister, Baylee, takes little sister, Emma, to the 'Potty Chair Outhouse' first thing in the morning.

The second picture is the 'potty chair' throne.

And the third picture shows the outhouse, affectionately called 'The Changing Room' because many suits were put on and taken off there to keep wet, sandy clothes and feet out of the camp.
Diane Bilodeau
Our outhouse at Cedar Lake is complete with an antique 'throne'. And, it has a 'potty chair' insert for the grandchildren. We took an antique chair, removed the leather insert, and replace it with a toilet seat. When the grandchildren came to visit, we inserted the 'potty seat' and pushed up the sturdy step Grampy made for them to get to it. In the first picture big sister, Baylee, takes little sister, Emma, to the 'Potty Chair Outhouse' first thing in the morning. The second picture is the 'potty chair' throne. And the third picture shows the outhouse, affectionately called 'The Changing Room' because many suits were put on and taken off there to keep wet, sandy clothes and feet out of the camp.
Our outhouse at Cedar Lake is complete with an antique 'throne'. And, it has a 'potty chair' insert for the grandchildren. We took an antique chair, removed the leather insert, and replace it with a toilet seat. When the grandchildren came to visit, we inserted the 'potty seat' and pushed up the sturdy step Grampy made for them to get to it. 
In the first picture big sister, Baylee, takes little sister, Emma, to the 'Potty Chair Outhouse' first thing in the morning.

The second picture is the 'potty chair' throne.

And the third picture shows the outhouse, affectionately called 'The Changing Room' because many suits were put on and taken off there to keep wet, sandy clothes and feet out of the camp.
Dianne Bilodeau
Our outhouse at Cedar Lake is complete with an antique 'throne'. And, it has a 'potty chair' insert for the grandchildren. We took an antique chair, removed the leather insert, and replace it with a toilet seat. When the grandchildren came to visit, we inserted the 'potty seat' and pushed up the sturdy step Grampy made for them to get to it. In the first picture big sister, Baylee, takes little sister, Emma, to the 'Potty Chair Outhouse' first thing in the morning. The second picture is the 'potty chair' throne. And the third picture shows the outhouse, affectionately called 'The Changing Room' because many suits were put on and taken off there to keep wet, sandy clothes and feet out of the camp.
Karen Wood of Wesley said her family’s outhouse originally was a milk shed in Westport, Mass., that was brought to Maine on a flatbed trailer, along iwth a chicken coop and put on the family property as a hunting camp and outhouse. In Westport it stored the day’s milk at the farm, it was brought in by the Tripboys to serve as a privy when they came to hunting camp. Sincde the 1970s the chicken coop has had a few additions with one just two years ago. The outhouse is still original, with a fresh coat of paint. The flowers o the door were added by Wood to give it more eye appeal. “We have seen a few critters comint out of the privy during the night, and the birds have heard many screams because of the spiders that visit durig the day. I keep a can of engine cleaner on the shelf, just in case some larger critter visits while I’m inside,” Wood said. “We live out in the woods of Wesley and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. We left the city to enjoy the quiet of the woods and appreciate what nature has to offer.”
Karen Wood
Karen Wood of Wesley said her family’s outhouse originally was a milk shed in Westport, Mass., that was brought to Maine on a flatbed trailer, along iwth a chicken coop and put on the family property as a hunting camp and outhouse. In Westport it stored the day’s milk at the farm, it was brought in by the Tripboys to serve as a privy when they came to hunting camp. Sincde the 1970s the chicken coop has had a few additions with one just two years ago. The outhouse is still original, with a fresh coat of paint. The flowers o the door were added by Wood to give it more eye appeal. “We have seen a few critters comint out of the privy during the night, and the birds have heard many screams because of the spiders that visit durig the day. I keep a can of engine cleaner on the shelf, just in case some larger critter visits while I’m inside,” Wood said. “We live out in the woods of Wesley and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. We left the city to enjoy the quiet of the woods and appreciate what nature has to offer.”
Karen Wood of Wesley said her family’s outhouse originally was a milk shed in Westport, Mass., that was brought to Maine on a flatbed trailer, along iwth a chicken coop and put on the family property as a hunting camp and outhouse. In Westport it stored the day’s milk at the farm, it was brought in by the Tripboys to serve as a privy when they came to hunting camp. Sincde the 1970s the chicken coop has had a few additions with one just two years ago. The outhouse is still original, with a fresh coat of paint. The flowers o the door were added by Wood to give it more eye appeal. “We have seen a few critters comint out of the privy during the night, and the birds have heard many screams because of the spiders that visit durig the day. I keep a can of engine cleaner on the shelf, just in case some larger critter visits while I’m inside,” Wood said. “We live out in the woods of Wesley and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. We left the city to enjoy the quiet of the woods and appreciate what nature has to offer.”
Karen Wood
Karen Wood of Wesley said her family’s outhouse originally was a milk shed in Westport, Mass., that was brought to Maine on a flatbed trailer, along iwth a chicken coop and put on the family property as a hunting camp and outhouse. In Westport it stored the day’s milk at the farm, it was brought in by the Tripboys to serve as a privy when they came to hunting camp. Sincde the 1970s the chicken coop has had a few additions with one just two years ago. The outhouse is still original, with a fresh coat of paint. The flowers o the door were added by Wood to give it more eye appeal. “We have seen a few critters comint out of the privy during the night, and the birds have heard many screams because of the spiders that visit durig the day. I keep a can of engine cleaner on the shelf, just in case some larger critter visits while I’m inside,” Wood said. “We live out in the woods of Wesley and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. We left the city to enjoy the quiet of the woods and appreciate what nature has to offer.”
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
While Milford woodworker Bill Everett's entry is certainly downsized, it's not without some Maine humor with touches like the blue tarp for the roof, the Moxie sticker, the bird roost and the doggy door in the rear.
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era.
Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill.
When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses.
During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago.
My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit.
Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer.
The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh?
We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area.
Please come visit.
The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life.
Diane Smith
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era. Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses. During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago. My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit. Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer. The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh? We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for life.
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era.
Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill.
When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses.
During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago.
My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit.
Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer.
The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh?
We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area.
Please come visit.
The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for lif
Diane Smith
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era. Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses. During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago. My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit. Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer. The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh? We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for lif
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era.
Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill.
When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses.
During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago.
My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit.
Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer.
The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh?
We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area.
Please come visit.
The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for lif
Diane Smith
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era. Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses. During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago. My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit. Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer. The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh? We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for lif
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era.
Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill.
When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses.
During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago.
My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit.
Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer.
The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh?
We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area.
Please come visit.
The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for lif
Diane Smith
The Blue Hill Loo is an inviting, genuine relic from the 50’s-60’s era. Its location is 835 Morgan Bay Road in East Blue Hill. When plumbing was finally installed in the main farmhouse in the 50’s, its usefulness changed.The outhouses (originally there were two - side by side) were moved from behind the old barn to the edge of the property and then served as children’s playhouses. During a Nor’easter in the 90’s one backhouse was completely demolished by a falling ancient spruce tree. To see it in ruins seemed so sad. We lovingly preserved this last one as a great historical reminder of what living was like on our c.1870’s farm property so many “moons” ago. My photography leaves a lot to be desired. You really must come see it in person before you judge it. To really appreciate the stained glass moon & star we added to class it up a bit. Also, we proudly own the noted favorite area geocache site (inside the Loo). Folks come here from all over to see it and even do return visits to show their friends and tourists in the summer. The children’s giggles we hear from the direction of the outhouse are heartwarming…and educational too! Eh? We aren’t too far away for a delightful afternoon drive to the Blue Hill area. Please come visit. The 3 Jersey cows across the road love bread heals and stale biscuits. If you treat them, you’ll have earned their friendship for lif
For one thing, it's on an island. The other thing is that it has a window that has been painted on over the begonias. Pretty classy place to visit, says Jim Miller of Belfast
Jim Miller
For one thing, it's on an island. The other thing is that it has a window that has been painted on over the begonias. Pretty classy place to visit, says Jim Miller of Belfast
For one thing, it's on an island. The other thing is that it has a window that has been painted on over the begonias. Pretty classy place to visit, says Jim Miller of Belfast.
Jim Miller
For one thing, it's on an island. The other thing is that it has a window that has been painted on over the begonias. Pretty classy place to visit, says Jim Miller of Belfast.
June Ingraham of Rockland said their outhouse is at their camp in Greenville.
June and William Ingraham
June Ingraham of Rockland said their outhouse is at their camp in Greenville.
June Ingraham of Rockland said their outhouse is at their camp in Greenville.
June and William Ingraham
June Ingraham of Rockland said their outhouse is at their camp in Greenville.
What makes this outhouse outstanding is that it is still standing. What makes it special are the memories we have surrounding the outhouse. Being locked in it, being intruded on and having someone film the surprised look on your face to provide hours of family entertainment. Daring each other to go in it at night without the light on. Having a "How long can you last" contest to see how long we could stay in it. We leave it up as a memorial to days gone by. Who knows maybe someone will dare to go it it again.
Ron Dube
What makes this outhouse outstanding is that it is still standing. What makes it special are the memories we have surrounding the outhouse. Being locked in it, being intruded on and having someone film the surprised look on your face to provide hours of family entertainment. Daring each other to go in it at night without the light on. Having a "How long can you last" contest to see how long we could stay in it. We leave it up as a memorial to days gone by. Who knows maybe someone will dare to go it it again.
What makes this outhouse outstanding is that it is still standing. What makes it special are the memories we have surrounding the outhouse. Being locked in it, being intruded on and having someone film the surprised look on your face to provide hours of family entertainment. Daring each other to go in it at night without the light on. Having a "How long can you last" contest to see how long we could stay in it. We leave it up as a memorial to days gone by. Who knows maybe someone will dare to go it it again.
Ron Dube
What makes this outhouse outstanding is that it is still standing. What makes it special are the memories we have surrounding the outhouse. Being locked in it, being intruded on and having someone film the surprised look on your face to provide hours of family entertainment. Daring each other to go in it at night without the light on. Having a "How long can you last" contest to see how long we could stay in it. We leave it up as a memorial to days gone by. Who knows maybe someone will dare to go it it again.
What makes this outhouse outstanding is that it is still standing. What makes it special are the memories we have surrounding the outhouse. Being locked in it, being intruded on and having someone film the surprised look on your face to provide hours of family entertainment. Daring each other to go in it at night without the light on. Having a "How long can you last" contest to see how long we could stay in it. We leave it up as a memorial to days gone by. Who knows maybe someone will dare to go it it again.
Ron Dube
What makes this outhouse outstanding is that it is still standing. What makes it special are the memories we have surrounding the outhouse. Being locked in it, being intruded on and having someone film the surprised look on your face to provide hours of family entertainment. Daring each other to go in it at night without the light on. Having a "How long can you last" contest to see how long we could stay in it. We leave it up as a memorial to days gone by. Who knows maybe someone will dare to go it it again.
This outhouse is the nature lover's delight. The exterior is adorned with a hand-carved moon and stars. Inside the visitor to the hallowed halls is entertained by unique items that help wile away the time. For example, a wooden grape-man (not pictured) and "warminghut" license plate, both hand-carved, decorate the walls as do other interesting artifacts and relics. On a more serious note, a mason jar holds the cremated ashes of the previous outhouse along with a small photo album showing the steps of its demise. The outhouse's museum-like quality insures that each time a visitor enters, he or she will see something not noticed before. No need for a chamber pot. A motion-sensored light greets nightly
Beth White
This outhouse is the nature lover's delight. The exterior is adorned with a hand-carved moon and stars. Inside the visitor to the hallowed halls is entertained by unique items that help wile away the time. For example, a wooden grape-man (not pictured) and "warminghut" license plate, both hand-carved, decorate the walls as do other interesting artifacts and relics. On a more serious note, a mason jar holds the cremated ashes of the previous outhouse along with a small photo album showing the steps of its demise. The outhouse's museum-like quality insures that each time a visitor enters, he or she will see something not noticed before. No need for a chamber pot. A motion-sensored light greets nightly
This outhouse is the nature lover's delight. The exterior is adorned with a hand-carved moon and stars. Inside the visitor to the hallowed halls is entertained by unique items that help wile away the time. For example, a wooden grape-man (not pictured) and "warminghut" license plate, both hand-carved, decorate the walls as do other interesting artifacts and relics. On a more serious note, a mason jar holds the cremated ashes of the previous outhouse along with a small photo album showing the steps of its demise. The outhouse's museum-like quality insures that each time a visitor enters, he or she will see something not noticed before. No need for a chamber pot. A motion-sensored light greets nightly
Beth White
This outhouse is the nature lover's delight. The exterior is adorned with a hand-carved moon and stars. Inside the visitor to the hallowed halls is entertained by unique items that help wile away the time. For example, a wooden grape-man (not pictured) and "warminghut" license plate, both hand-carved, decorate the walls as do other interesting artifacts and relics. On a more serious note, a mason jar holds the cremated ashes of the previous outhouse along with a small photo album showing the steps of its demise. The outhouse's museum-like quality insures that each time a visitor enters, he or she will see something not noticed before. No need for a chamber pot. A motion-sensored light greets nightly
This outhouse is the nature lover's delight. The exterior is adorned with a hand-carved moon and stars. Inside the visitor to the hallowed halls is entertained by unique items that help wile away the time. For example, a wooden grape-man (not pictured) and "warminghut" license plate, both hand-carved, decorate the walls as do other interesting artifacts and relics. On a more serious note, a mason jar holds the cremated ashes of the previous outhouse along with a small photo album showing the steps of its demise. The outhouse's museum-like quality insures that each time a visitor enters, he or she will see something not noticed before. No need for a chamber pot. A motion-sensored light greets nightly
Beth White
This outhouse is the nature lover's delight. The exterior is adorned with a hand-carved moon and stars. Inside the visitor to the hallowed halls is entertained by unique items that help wile away the time. For example, a wooden grape-man (not pictured) and "warminghut" license plate, both hand-carved, decorate the walls as do other interesting artifacts and relics. On a more serious note, a mason jar holds the cremated ashes of the previous outhouse along with a small photo album showing the steps of its demise. The outhouse's museum-like quality insures that each time a visitor enters, he or she will see something not noticed before. No need for a chamber pot. A motion-sensored light greets nightly
Steve Patten of Springfield had some downtime while building his camp in Prentis. Not wanting to waste it, he set to building this outhouse he calls his masterpiece.
Steve Patten
Steve Patten of Springfield had some downtime while building his camp in Prentis. Not wanting to waste it, he set to building this outhouse he calls his masterpiece.
Steve Patten of Springfield had some downtime while building his camp in Prentis. Not wanting to waste it, he set to building this outhouse he calls his masterpiece.
Steve Patten
Steve Patten of Springfield had some downtime while building his camp in Prentis. Not wanting to waste it, he set to building this outhouse he calls his masterpiece.
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
Cheryl Boulier
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
Cheryl Boulier
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
Cheryl Boulier
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
Cheryl Boulier
Cheryl Boulier of Presque Isle says her outhouse is made of barn board, large enough for two and is complete with a decorative flower box on the side and makes its home in my flower garden. Truly a topic of conversation for those walking past our home.
The Gillespies of Boardman Street in Calais sent in this picture of their outhouse in T1 R1 on the St. Croix River. Woody Woodpecker on the door elicits a laugh from first-time guests.
Gillespie Photo
The Gillespies of Boardman Street in Calais sent in this picture of their outhouse in T1 R1 on the St. Croix River. Woody Woodpecker on the door elicits a laugh from first-time guests.
The Gillespies of Boardman Street in Calais sent in this picture of their outhouse in T1 R1 on the St. Croix River. Woody Woodpecker on the door elicits a laugh from first-time guests.
Gillespie Photo
The Gillespies of Boardman Street in Calais sent in this picture of their outhouse in T1 R1 on the St. Croix River. Woody Woodpecker on the door elicits a laugh from first-time guests.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne
Bernard and Diane Chadbourne of Windy Ridge in Ripley say their outhouse story started in 1951, the year Barnard was born at his grandparents house in Harmony. In 1975 he built the outhouse in Ripley, using the door from his grandparents’ outhouse. The facility was used for 14 years while the family grew, first with the marriage to Diane in 1977, then with the birth of their children Arie and Eric. After their home had electricity installed in 1991 the family used the outhouse as a backup during power failures. Today it still serves that purpose and is an architectural oddity serving as backup to another generation, grandchildren Taylor, Sophie and Preslee.
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
Melanie Leach
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
Melanie Leach
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
Melanie Leach
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
Melanie Leach
Our outhouse is an original!! It was rescued from a home that was burned many years ago by the Sedgwick Fire Department. It was last owned by Melvin Brown and stood abandoned for many years. When ours needed replacing, my husband found this one, still standing, and we brought it home. We replaced the floor and the roof, but other that that, and a few coats of paint, he is as he was made. We estimate he is circa 1930's. The half-moon on the front door is actually a part of the seat we had to cut out to make the toilet seat fit!
This outhouse has been in used for over 30 years, said  Sebastian Francis of Indian Island. It is now semi-retired but once in awhile someone brave enough goes to used it, even with the 3 spiders hanging out by the door.
Sebastian Francis
This outhouse has been in used for over 30 years, said Sebastian Francis of Indian Island. It is now semi-retired but once in awhile someone brave enough goes to used it, even with the 3 spiders hanging out by the door.
This outhouse has been in used for over 30 years, said  Sebastian Francis of Indian Island. It is now semi-retired but once in awhile someone brave enough goes to used it, even with the 3 spiders hanging out by the door.
Sebastian Francis
This outhouse has been in used for over 30 years, said Sebastian Francis of Indian Island. It is now semi-retired but once in awhile someone brave enough goes to used it, even with the 3 spiders hanging out by the door.
This outhouse has been in used for over 30 years, said  Sebastian Francis of Indian Island. It is now semi-retired but once in awhile someone brave enough goes to used it, even with the 3 spiders hanging out by the door.
Sebastian Francis
This outhouse has been in used for over 30 years, said Sebastian Francis of Indian Island. It is now semi-retired but once in awhile someone brave enough goes to used it, even with the 3 spiders hanging out by the door.
Carol Leonard of Hopkinton, N.H., sent this picture of her family’s new Pooporium at Camp Kwitchabitchin on at Bad Beaver Farm, 222 Red Bridge Road, Ellsworth, that was made last spring with home-sawn lumber by her husband, Tom. The windows came from a 1920’s lake house in New Hampshire that was torn down to make way for a McMansion. The door is a beautiful old solid wood door that she painted the deep dark green that I’ve used on all the trim. Tom decided to put a shed roof on the structure with a slight pitch to it for snow melt. She found shee had some shutters in a shed that fit the windows perfectly. She painted the shutters the same trim green and Tom put up a little plant shelf under the window that holds a crock planted by my mother. I found some elegant lace curtains in a thrift store that she hung in the windows.
Carol Leonard
Carol Leonard of Hopkinton, N.H., sent this picture of her family’s new Pooporium at Camp Kwitchabitchin on at Bad Beaver Farm, 222 Red Bridge Road, Ellsworth, that was made last spring with home-sawn lumber by her husband, Tom. The windows came from a 1920’s lake house in New Hampshire that was torn down to make way for a McMansion. The door is a beautiful old solid wood door that she painted the deep dark green that I’ve used on all the trim. Tom decided to put a shed roof on the structure with a slight pitch to it for snow melt. She found shee had some shutters in a shed that fit the windows perfectly. She painted the shutters the same trim green and Tom put up a little plant shelf under the window that holds a crock planted by my mother. I found some elegant lace curtains in a thrift store that she hung in the windows.
Interior of pooporium
Carol Leonard
Interior of pooporium
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Donna Melanson
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Donna Melanson
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Donna Melanson
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Donna Melanson
Some people have described out Outhouse as the Uptown Outhouse. Our outhouse is located on West Grand Lake, Maine
Will Dupuis of Boothbay Harbor sent pictures of this cute little latrine that  is nestled in a beautiful stand of trees next to the club house owned by the Boothbay Region Fish and Game Association. In the spring, there are lady slippers poking out from under leaves all overlooking a quiet trout pond. (I am actually not a member of the club, but the public has access to the pond as the state stocks it regularly. Just thought you should have a pic)
Will Dupuis
Will Dupuis of Boothbay Harbor sent pictures of this cute little latrine that is nestled in a beautiful stand of trees next to the club house owned by the Boothbay Region Fish and Game Association. In the spring, there are lady slippers poking out from under leaves all overlooking a quiet trout pond. (I am actually not a member of the club, but the public has access to the pond as the state stocks it regularly. Just thought you should have a pic)
Will Dupuis of Boothbay Harbor sent pictures of this cute little latrine that  is nestled in a beautiful stand of trees next to the club house owned by the Boothbay Region Fish and Game Association. In the spring, there are lady slippers poking out from under leaves all overlooking a quiet trout pond. (I am actually not a member of the club, but the public has access to the pond as the state stocks it regularly. Just thought you should have a pic)
Will Dupuis
Will Dupuis of Boothbay Harbor sent pictures of this cute little latrine that is nestled in a beautiful stand of trees next to the club house owned by the Boothbay Region Fish and Game Association. In the spring, there are lady slippers poking out from under leaves all overlooking a quiet trout pond. (I am actually not a member of the club, but the public has access to the pond as the state stocks it regularly. Just thought you should have a pic)

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