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Aaron Pyle (left) and Shawn Lefevre work to install the work of New York-based artist Jason Bard Yarmosky at the University of Maine Museum of Art in Bangor Thursday. Yarmosky's show features large, realistic paintings of his elderly grandmother, who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.
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Alzheimer’s turns into artwork at upcoming Bangor exhibit

The show will hang through September 2, serving as the catalyst for a summer series of free noontime talks and workshops aimed at educating family caregivers about age-related dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.
Peter Werner talks about the 1961 reprints of the Gutenberg Bible he is in the process of binding for a customer. Werner of Blue Hill is a master bookbinder who learned the craft from his grandfather, Arno Werner.
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‘Understated elegance’: Inside the world of a Blue Hill bookbinder

“I love producing something beautiful and functional that you can hold in your hand,” said Peter Werner, a master bookbinder in Blue Hill.
WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU CURVES

Being in a feisty state of mind

Workmen stay busy at a 24-unit Avesta Housing project site in Gorham in 2016.

Maine House GOP has votes to sink bid to issue $15 million senior housing bond

The Maine House of Representatives initially voted 85-57 on Tuesday to issue that bond money.
CATCHING HEALTH

Help! Why can’t I get a decent night’s sleep?

Have insomnia? Sleep specialist Dr. Christopher Hughes talks about common causes and how to break the cycle. Listen to our podcast.
Deborah Klane (clockwise from right), Evan Klane and nurse Dece Dostie.

Already financially stressed, Maine caregivers fear Medicaid cuts in AHCA

AHCA opponents argue that it will result in cuts to care.
WHEN LIFE GIVES YOU CURVES

10 notes about this in-between time of year

YOUR COUNTDOWN TO RETIREMENT

Silver streaks

As baby boomers recognize the importance of mindset and movement in aging, they understand being a “silver streak” may add years to your life.

Study links diet soda to higher risk of stroke, dementia

Americans trying to stay healthy have abandoned sugary drinks for diet drinks in droves over the past few decades on the theory that the latter is better than the former. Now, more evidence has emerged to refute that rationale.