From the community

“The equal marriage of the sun and frost.”

Posted March 21, 2013, at 2:03 p.m.
Last modified March 22, 2013, at 11:45 a.m.
My guess would be that both of these maple tree are near two hundred years old each.
My guess would be that both of these maple tree are near two hundred years old each.
What is in this picture? An old maple tree, two traditional looking sap buckets, and an old field stone fence.
What is in this picture? An old maple tree, two traditional looking sap buckets, and an old field stone fence.
After I had taken this picture, I could see where over the many years taps had been inserted into the tree.
After I had taken this picture, I could see where over the many years taps had been inserted into the tree.
Two sap buckets are hooked to this tree one in the center front and the other to the left.  A low field stone fence runs near the maple trees. The fence most likely marks an old property boundary line. This stand of maple trees remembers when, what we call route 176, was a dusty road. Each year this tree keep on giving us the joy of having maple syrup.
Two sap buckets are hooked to this tree one in the center front and the other to the left. A low field stone fence runs near the maple trees. The fence most likely marks an old property boundary line. This stand of maple trees remembers when, what we call route 176, was a dusty road. Each year this tree keep on giving us the joy of having maple syrup.

Sunday afternoon I took a drive toward Blue Hill. Patches of snows rested in fields.

Winters maybe had have made its final curtain call?

Following route 176 seemed like a good idea because sections of this route

have a rural feeling. I was hoping to photograph some traditional

looking sap buckets attached to old maple trees. Over a slight rise in the road then around a curve, I spotted a stand of maple trees with attached sap buckets. Parking along the road side, I powered up my Galaxy III, scrambled over a shallow watery ditch, and quickly scanned the trees for the most scenic pictures. There was ten or more tree with taps. I selected the trees which appeared to be the oldest with a field stone fence in the background. The stand of maples was like a “pot of gold” for me or I should say like a pitcher of golden Maine maple syrup. John Burroughs from Signs and Season in 1886 described this memorable time of year,

“A sap-run is the sweet good-by of winter. It is the fruit of the equal marriage of the sun and frost.”

Joseph S Palmer, Trenton, Maine

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