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Phoenix House appoints Dr. Andrew Kolodny as chief medical officer

Posted Sept. 13, 2013, at 5:45 p.m.
Last modified Sept. 28, 2013, at 1:48 p.m.

Phoenix House, the nation’s leading nonprofit provider of substance abuse and treatment and prevention services, announced  its appointment of Andrew Kolodny, M.D., a nationally recognized psychiatrist and public health advocate, as chief medical officer, effective Sept. 9.

“Dr. Andrew Kolodny brings to Phoenix House a wealth of clinical experience in addiction medicine,” said Howard Meitiner, president and CEO of Phoenix House, in a press statement. “He will also contribute a passion for public education and policy reform as it relates to prescription drug abuse, which now accounts for more overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined. It will be our great fortune to have him at the helm of our clinical services as we strive to touch more lives and improve the quality of care in the era of healthcare reform.”

Dr. Kolodny joins Phoenix House from Maimonides Medical Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he has served as the chair of psychiatry since 2008.  In this capacity, he provided clinical and administrative oversight of psychiatric services and a residency-training program for one of the largest community teaching hospitals in the country. During his tenure, he demonstrated a hands-on approach to moving the organization forward, developing a psychiatric emergency room, a partial hospitalization, and a co-located primary care program.

Prior to his appointment at Maimonides, Dr. Kolodny established a stellar career in public health, with a special focus on addiction medicine. After completing a public psychology fellowship at Columbia University and serving as a fellow on Congressional Health Policy, he joined the New York City Department of Public Health, where his first assignment was to reduce overdose deaths. In this role, he successfully arranged for all New York City hospitals to begin administering the opioid addiction treatment Buprenorphine. As medical director of special projects in the Office of the Executive Deputy Commissioner for New York City Health and Mental Hygiene, he also developed and implemented naloxone overdose prevention programs, as well as emergency intervention and referral to treatment programs for drug and alcohol misuse.

Over the course of his career, Dr. Kolodny has also devoted himself to reducing the nation’s prescription drug abuse epidemic. He is a founder and the current president of Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP), a 1,000-member organization that seeks to promote cautious and safe prescribing practices. In addition to educating primary care physicians, PROP advocates for FDA regulations and other policy measures to curtail opioid over-prescription. Dr. Kolodny is a nationally recognized speaker and advocate, and his clinical practice focuses on opioid addiction treatment.

Dr. Kolodny earned his bachelor’s degree from Queens College and his medical degree from Temple University School of Medicine. He completed his residency in psychiatry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He resides in Brooklyn, New York.

As a leading nonprofit provider of substance abuse treatment and prevention services since 1967, Phoenix House helps more than 7,000 men, women and teens each day as they overcome addiction and begin new lives in recovery. Our research-tested treatment methods and clinical practices meet the needs of each individual client.  Our nearly 150 programs in CaliforniaFloridaMaineMassachusettsNew HampshireNew YorkRhode Island,TexasVermont, and Virginia/Maryland/Metro D.C. welcome clients from every level of society and address a broad range of behavioral problems. We work with kids at risk, support clients in recovery, and offer a wide array of treatment options as well as supportive services ranging from vocational training and counseling to expressive arts therapy.

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