From the community

Old Town Rotary donates $140,000 to Sarah’s House of Maine

Posted Oct. 14, 2013, at 1:29 p.m.
Peter Bosse (left), president of the Old Town Rotary Club, presents a check for $140,000 to Sarah's House of Maine, a hospitality house for cancer payments to be located in the former Fox Run Furniture building on Main Road in Holden.  Accepting the check is Ben Robinson (center), chairman of Sarah's House of Maine and husband of the late Sarah Robinson, who came up with the idea for the hospitality house while receiving treatment for cancer at the Lafayette Family Cancer Center, Eastern Maine Medical Center's Cancer Care of Maine facility in Brewer. The Rotary Club's donation represents the proceeds of the sale of a house that club members built on Abbott Street in Old Town with the help of numerous volunteers and businesses. Also in the photo: Dan Thornton (second from left), president-elect of the Old Town Rotary Club; Lindsay Turner, twin sister of Sarah Robinson and a board member of Sarah's House of Maine; David Walker, who purchased the Abbott Street house; and Stan Peterson of the Old Town Rotary Club, who led the Abbott Street house project.
Peter Bosse (left), president of the Old Town Rotary Club, presents a check for $140,000 to Sarah's House of Maine, a hospitality house for cancer payments to be located in the former Fox Run Furniture building on Main Road in Holden. Accepting the check is Ben Robinson (center), chairman of Sarah's House of Maine and husband of the late Sarah Robinson, who came up with the idea for the hospitality house while receiving treatment for cancer at the Lafayette Family Cancer Center, Eastern Maine Medical Center's Cancer Care of Maine facility in Brewer. The Rotary Club's donation represents the proceeds of the sale of a house that club members built on Abbott Street in Old Town with the help of numerous volunteers and businesses. Also in the photo: Dan Thornton (second from left), president-elect of the Old Town Rotary Club; Lindsay Turner, twin sister of Sarah Robinson and a board member of Sarah's House of Maine; David Walker, who purchased the Abbott Street house; and Stan Peterson of the Old Town Rotary Club, who led the Abbott Street house project.

HOLDEN, Maine — The Old Town Rotary Club has donated $140,000 to Sarah’s House of Maine, a hospitality house for cancer patients at Eastern Maine Medical Center’s Cancer Care of Maine facility in Brewer.

Sarah’s House will be located in the former Fox Run Furniture building on Main Road in Holden, just a short drive from the Lafayette Family Cancer Center.  Sarah’s House will provide cancer patients who have to travel long distances with a place they can stay for little or no cost while receiving treatment.

The Old Town Rotary Club’s donation represents the proceeds from the sale of a house that the club built on Abbott Street in Old Town.  Club members and many local contractors donated their time to build the Abbott Street house, and most of the construction materials also were donated by local businesses.

The check presentation ceremony was held Oct. 10, at Sarah’s House in Holden, at a “thank you” dinner sponsored by the Old Town Rotary Club for volunteers and contributors who assisted with the Abbott Street house project. The Abbott Street house was purchased by David Walker, superintendent of schools for RSU 34 (Alton, Bradley, and Old Town).

Sarah’s House is the dream of Sarah Robinson, an Old Town Rotarian who was diagnosed with cancer in 2010. Sarah and her husband, Ben, had to travel from Old Town to Boston for treatment. Through that experience, they learned about places where cancer patients could stay for little or no cost during their treatment.

When Sarah returned to the Lafayette Family Cancer Center in Maine, she met patients who, like her, had traveled hundreds of miles in the course of receiving treatment. Many of the patients Sarah met had spent hours in the car, driving from Maine’s most rural areas to receive care. With first-hand knowledge of the physical, emotional, and financial challenges experienced by those undergoing cancer treatment, Sarah wanted to help and invested time and energy into bringing people together around her vision.

Sarah died in December 2011, but with the two years given to her, she worked diligently to promote her dream of a cancer hospitality house for residents of eastern, central, and northern Maine.  As a result of her efforts, Tommy Thornton of Milford, a fellow member of the Old Town Rotary Club donated land on Abbott Street in Old Town for construction of a house to provide seed money for Sarah’s House.

Ben has joined with others in this region who want to see Sarah’s dream come true.  They have formed an organization, Sarah’s House of Maine, which has has been raising funds to make Sarah’s House a reality.

The first phase of creating Sarah’s House requires an immediate investment of $893,000. This sum will cover necessary renovations to the Holden location and the first five years of operations. Long-term sustainability, at little to no cost to our guests, will require an endowment of $3 million in order to provide maintenance and staffing. A campaign is now underway to meet both short- and long-term goals.

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