From the community

Judge hosts mock trial in Belfast

Ryan Thompson, Alex Doyne-Ditmas, Isabel Callan, Leeman Webb, Josh Bradeen, Madryn Evans-Moran, Taran Evans-Moran, Spencer Muniz, Adrian Doyne-Ditmas, Scratch Callan, Judge Susan W. Longley, Rio Greeley, Owen Allen, Brian Johnson, Clayton Martin, Patrick Martell, Brett Gotham and Bradley Frost
Ryan Thompson, Alex Doyne-Ditmas, Isabel Callan, Leeman Webb, Josh Bradeen, Madryn Evans-Moran, Taran Evans-Moran, Spencer Muniz, Adrian Doyne-Ditmas, Scratch Callan, Judge Susan W. Longley, Rio Greeley, Owen Allen, Brian Johnson, Clayton Martin, Patrick Martell, Brett Gotham and Bradley Frost
Posted May 02, 2012, at 12:31 p.m.
Last modified May 02, 2012, at 1:02 p.m.

BELFAST, Maine — Judge Susan W. Longley celebrated Law Day with members of the Game Loft at the Waldo County Probate Court in Belfast. Game Loft members appeared in court for a mock trial on an matter of concern to them — the issues of the missing magic cards.

According to Patrick Martell, a member of the Game Loft legal team, one issue of concern involves the strange disappearance of magic cards. “A $20 bill is safer on the floor of the Game Loft than one of these magic cards. And in court this week, we had our chance to present our case for justice to be served with our missing magic cards issue to be addressed once and for all.”

According to Judge Longley, “Law Day provides those of us in the justice system a way to honor the rule of law and its place in American society. As with members of the Game Loft in court today, Law Day gives many the opportunity to better understand how the law works, both procedurally and substantively. In Waldo County Probate Court today, we also introduced the students to mediation. And with the assistance of professional mediator Jacqui Clark, the Game Loft legal teams performed magnificently and even turned their difficult legal dispute into a creative and fun agreement favorable to everyone.”

Historically, each year since 1957, the American Bar Association has promoted May 1st as Law Day through-out the nation and encourages courts and members of local bars to find ways to help citizens realize that it is through the law that we have justice and freedom. In 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower established the first Law Day, and in 1961 the U.S. Congress issued a joint resolution making May 1 the official Law Day.

This year’s specific Law Day theme “No Courts, No Justice, No Freedom,” states Longley, “provides an outstanding opportunity for these students to learn about the working of a court system, how courts guard their rights and how justice and freedom can be achieved.”

Finally, according to Judge Longley, “Law Day activities need not occur only for the public on this one day. We in the legal profession value the public’ interest in learning about the law. Should other student or adult groups be interested in similar law day fun, Judge Longley would welcome the interest and would be happy to work with groups, help prepare members for a mock trial on any issue of importance to that group and hold this trial at the site of the group’s choice. For those groups interested in planning their own “law day” activity with the assistance Judge Longley, she can be contacted at 207-338-2780 or judgeofprobate@waldocountyme.gov.

 

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