From the community

In Race for Portland City Council, Lyons Picks Up Three Endorsements

Posted Oct. 07, 2013, at 12:36 p.m.

PORTLAND, ME – Wells Lyons has received the endorsements of three council members in his campaign for an At-Large seat on the council. Supporting Lyons are John Anton, David Marshall and Kevin Donoghue.

John Anton, retiring Portland City Councilor At-Large, is supporting Lyons in the campaign. If elected, Lyons would replace Anton on the council. “Wells Lyons has what it takes to serve Portland. His energy, intellect and persistence will all be assets on the Council, while his experience as an entrepreneur will provide creative solutions and a critical eye towards city policies,” says Anton.

David Marshall, District 2 Councilor, adds “From supporting bonds for reinvestment in our schools to opposing the sale of Congress Square Park, Wells Lyons is consistently a progressive voice. As a level-headed and thoughtful leader, Wells Lyons will be an effective City Councilor.”

Kevin Donoghue, District 1 Councilor, says “Wells Lyons is the partner Portland needs. He will work hard for the working families in our city, finding solutions to make Portland a place where we can all succeed. He has the energy and aptitude to both serve his constituents and support his colleagues in complex policy work. Please join me in electing Wells Lyons as Portland’s newest City Councilor.”

“I’m honored to have the support of John, Kevin and Dave. They’re thoughtful, engaged councilmembers who truly care about our city,” said Lyons. “I’ll serve with the same dedication and commitment they have shown.”

Lyons, a Democrat, has also received the endorsements of Progressive Majority and the Maine League of Young Voters. This is his second run for City Council – in last year’s race he received over 13,000 votes.

Election Day is November 5th.

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