From the community

Artist’s Reception at Courthouse Gallery, Wednesday, August 20, 5-7pm

Posted Aug. 14, 2014, at 10:34 a.m.
Philip Frey, &quotThe Long View," oil on linen, 30 x 40 inches.
Courthouse Gallery Fine Art
Philip Frey, "The Long View," oil on linen, 30 x 40 inches.

Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Location: Courthouse Gallery Fine Art, 6 Court Street, Ellsworth, Maine

For more information: 207-667-6611; courthousegallery.com

Courthouse Gallery Fine Art is pleased to present two exhibitions opening on Wednesday, August 20—Philip Frey: “In the Moment,” and Ed Nadeau and Paul Hannon: “Mainstream Allure.” The exhibitions will run through September 14. There will be an artist’s reception on Wednesday, August 20, from 5 to 7pm. The event is free and open to the public.

For his new body of work, artist Philip Frey turns his focus toward movement—water sparkles, objects are no longer inert, and large unencumbered areas free of figures leave Frey plenty of room to work his magic when he tones wide spaces devoid of detail with bold color and shimmering hues. Philip Frey will give an artist’s talk about his work and career on Wednesday, August 20 at 6pm at the gallery.

In their two-person show, Ed Nadeau and Paul Hannon share their diverse viewpoint of small city scenes and landscapes in Maine and Nova Scotia. Nadeau thrives on everyday life—whether it’s the remnant of a cigarette in the road or two crows perched on a power line high above a neighborhood street. Known for his paintings of a life lived “near the edge,” Nadeau has an uncanny ability to bring his unique narrative vision form the city to the landscape. A master storyteller, Nadeau continues to bring our attention to the power and intrigue of ordinary moments. Paul Hannon, who lives in Halifax, Nova Scotia, uses this quaint maritime city as inspiration for his captivating urban scenes. Hannon’s rich imagery recalls mid-century America, a wistful era of simpler times—before big-box stores, shopping malls, and the Internet—when mom and pop stores occupied every corner, in every neighborhood. Hannon prefers evening scenes, using the light from street lamps and neon signs to make subtle distinctions in expression—rainy streets shimmer with colorful hues, weathered facades are beautifully shadowed, and windows glow from within.

This post was contributed by a community member. Submit your news →

SEE COMMENTS →

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business

Similar Articles

More in Living