Contributors

 
CONTRIBUTORS
New White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci addresses the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., July 21, 2017.

The clock may have just run out on the White House press corps

By Jennifer Palmieri, The Washington Post on July 24, 2017, at 8:34 a.m.
Having the communications director serve as on-camera spokesperson seems an apt metaphor for Trump’s disdainful view of the press. In his mind, reporters do not exist to press him for answers on behalf of the American people but to communicate whatever message Trump chooses to give the American public.
CONTRIBUTORS

It’s time to fix our outdated air traffic control system

By Mike Willey on July 24, 2017, at 7:36 a.m.
In a world where $150 smartphones have satellite-based GPS navigation systems, we still use 1950s-era radar and slips of paper to track the planes in our airspace.
GWYNNE DYER
A woman walks with a child amid rubble at Bustan al-Qasr neighborhood in Aleppo, Syria July 16, 2017.

No peace yet in Iraq (or Syria)

By Gwynne Dyer on July 24, 2017, at 6:43 a.m.
There’s lots of fighting left to be done and lots of opportunities yet for the United States and Russia to stumble into a confrontation. Stay tuned.
CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER
Supporters of the the parents of critically ill baby Charlie Gard, Connie Yates and Chris Gard, hold a banner before handing in a petition to Great Ormond Street Hospital, in central London, Britain July 9, 2017.

What to do for little Charlie Gard

By Charles Krauthammer, The Washington Post on July 23, 2017, at 3:11 p.m.
One cannot imagine a more wrenching moral dilemma than the case of little Charlie Gard.
CONTRIBUTORS
Every year since 2010, Social Security revenues, excluding interest earned, have been lower than payouts, and things promise to get worse.

Let’s run the fantasy math on Social Security

By Allan Sloan, The Washington Post on July 23, 2017, at 11:04 a.m.
Preserving Social Security in anything like its current form for our kids and grandkids involves sacrifice, not financial subterfuge.
CONTRIBUTORS
Salena Sawtelle combs Ora Bartlet's hair before taking him to eat breakfast at the Stillwater Health Care facility in Bangor recently.

How our nursing home is attracting caregivers to tend to aging Mainers

By Phillip Bennett on July 23, 2017, at 10:13 a.m.
Maine nursing homes face an intractable CNA shortage with no precedent, and they have been struggling for some time with how to deal with it.
CONTRIBUTORS

Nothing is more empowering than when others see the goodness in us

By Robin Barstow on July 23, 2017, at 10 a.m.
It feels good to see goodness in another person. And it feels good when the goodness in us is seen. Acknowledging this gives strength to the goodness.
CONTRIBUTORS
A U.S. Marine (L) shakes hand with Afghan National Army (ANA) soldiers during a training exercise in Helmand province, Afghanistan July 5, 2017.

America is disrespecting its wartime allies

By Matt Zeller, The Washington Post on July 22, 2017, at 11:13 a.m.
Only in America do certain dreams become reality. Yes, people are still fighting and dying for a chance — just a chance — to experience that reality for their families. We owe that to them. We must remain shoulder to shoulder with our allies.
CONTRIBUTORS

Why the second American Revolution deserves as much attention as the first

By Gregory P. Downs, The Washington Post on July 22, 2017, at 7:46 a.m.
It is not hard to see why people celebrate Independence Day and forget the period of Reconstruction after the Civil War, even though that period was, in many respects, a Second Founding.
CONTIRBUTORS
President Donald Trump attends a "Made in America" event on pharmaceutical glass manufacturing at the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, July 20, 2017.

How can Trump become a dictator if he can’t accomplish anything?

By Christian Caryl, The Washington Post on July 21, 2017, at 1:53 p.m.
He blusters and bumbles, and the business of government limps along despite him.
CONTRIBUTORS
White House National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster speaks in the White House briefing room in Washington, May 16, 2017.

Disloyalty begets disloyalty

By Jennifer Rubin, The Washington Post on July 21, 2017, at 8:54 a.m.
It’s every man for himself in this administration. Defending Trump carries the risk of personal embarrassment or even a visit from the special prosecutor.
CONTRIBUTORS
Maine State Police officers go to their vehicles at a road block on Russell Road in Madison, where Somerset County sheriff's deputies shot and killed a man suspected of shooting four people, July 5, 2017.

The long, dark history of violence against women

By Jerome Nadelhaft on July 21, 2017, at 6:02 a.m.
One could hope that an acute awareness of intimate partner violence would be enough to prompt state legislatures to act. But it is likely that something else is needed, an awareness of how long people have been fighting to guarantee all married women the right to live.
MAINELY THOUGHTS

How much does Medicaid reimburse for affronts to human dignity?

on July 20, 2017, at 12:53 p.m.
Something inherent in the darker side of our nature still needs to believe some humans have less value than others when it comes to basic human dignity.
CONTRIBUTORS


The former top climate policy official at the Department of Interior filed a complaint on July 19 and a whistleblower disclosure form with the Office of Special Counsel. The official, Joel Clement, says the Trump administration is threatening public health and safety by trying to silence scientists like him.

I’m a scientist and a Mainer. I’m blowing the whistle on the Trump administration.

By Joel Clement, The Washington Post on July 20, 2017, at 10:04 a.m.
“I am a scientist, a policy expert, a civil servant and a worried citizen. Reluctantly, I am also a whistleblower on an administration that chooses silence over science.”
CONTRIBUTORS
Students walk across the University of Maine Mall in Orono between classes in this 2011 file photo. The UMaine System board of trustees on Monday created a 17-seat panel tasked with finding a new replacement for outgoing President Susan Hunter, who oversees the Orono and Machias campuses, when she retires in June 2018.

Americans love higher education, just not their universities

By Jeffrey J. Selingo, The Washington Post on July 20, 2017, at 9:44 a.m.
This marks quite a shift in public opinion.
CONTRIBUTORS
Maine’s programs serving adults with intellectual and development disabilities has been described as a “system in crisis” after years of low staffing and poor oversight.

Maine’s forgotten adults adrift in ‘a system in crisis’ after years of neglect

By Colleen Hennessy on July 20, 2017, at 9:40 a.m.
We need to start paying attention to this easily ignored community and holding our state accountable for its lack of planning, reform or innovation.
CONTRIBUTORS

The selfishness of the rich

By Edwin Treworgy on July 20, 2017, at 8:10 a.m.
The cold hearts of the rich are devastating to millions of veterans and poor families. The poor shiver with the cold and suffer with hunger, while the rich feast. Their bodies are inadequately clothed, and there is little comfort for them in their shacks. Survival, not comfort or happiness, is their goal.
DANA MILBANK
Callista Gingrich takes her seat for a U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing to discuss in part her nomination as President Donald Trump's pick to be U.S. ambassador to the Vatican, on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. July 18, 2017.

What will Callista Gingrich do as ambassador to the Vatican?

By Dana Milbank, The Washington Post on July 20, 2017, at 7:34 a.m.
Let us consider the qualifications of President Donald Trump’s nominee to be Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Holy See: one Callista Gingrich of Virginia.
CONTRIBUTORS
An anti-facist protester yells at law enforcement during competing demonstrations in Portland, Oregon, June 4, 2017.

Liberal America has a political violence problem

By Albert Eisenberg, The Philadelphia Inquirer on July 20, 2017, at 6:50 a.m.
It’s time for liberal America to speak out against violence and the rhetoric that incites it.
CONTRIBUTORS
Ellsworth Fire Lt. Gary Saunders washes down a firefighter on Thursday, May 2, 2013, in a demonstration of how the department attempts to rid turnout gear of soot, smoke and dust that contain dangerous chemicals.

Maine owes it to firefighters to protect them from toxic flame retardants

By Linda Baker on July 19, 2017, at 10:46 a.m.
Firefighter cancer is linked to the deadly chemicals firefighters are exposed to on the job.