Contributors

 
CONTRIBUTORS
A view of the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee at Robert E. Lee Park in the Oak Lawn neighborhood of Dallas on August 16, 2017. The statue was unveiled by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on June 12, 1936. Dallas mayor Mike Rawlings has called for a task force to study the issue of whether or not to remove the city's Confederate monuments.

Are George Washington and Thomas Jefferson next?

By John M. Crisp, Tribune News Service on Aug. 22, 2017, at 8:48 a.m.
They were racists and white supremacists, but no one looks to them to affirm those repugnant values.
CONTRIBUTORS

It’s only been a year, but the monument is already benefiting the Katahdin region

By Richard Schmidt III on Aug. 22, 2017, at 7:19 a.m.
The establishment of the monument in the Katahdin region was like the power returning after a storm.
CONTRIBUTORS
People visit the makeshift memorial to car attack victim Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Virginia, Aug. 18, 2017.

Legalizing vehicular violence

By Catherine Rampell, The Washington Post on Aug. 22, 2017, at 6:55 a.m.
Republican lawmakers in at least six states have proposed bills designed to protect drivers who strike protesters.
CONTRIBUTORS

Canada’s NAFTA negotiators may find an unusual ally in LePage

By Jesse Robichaud on Aug. 21, 2017, at 10:03 a.m.
What makes LePage most valuable is that his connection to Canada neatly intersects with a political brand of populism and hyperbole that he shares with Trump.
GWYNNE DYER
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi gestures as he addresses the nation from the historic Red Fort during Independence Day celebrations in Delhi, India, Aug. 15, 2017.

India is starting to look more like Pakistan

By Gwynne Dyer on Aug. 21, 2017, at 6:54 a.m.
The bottom line is the religious minorities are being marginalized, and the people who define India as a “Hindu country” are in charge.
DAVID IGNATIUS
Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford and Chief of the General Staff of the Chinese People's Liberation Army Gen. Fang Fenghui shake hands after signing an agreement to strengthen communication between the two militaries amid tensions concerning North Korea at the Bayi Building in Beijing, Aug. 15, 2017.

US wonders if permanent treaty with North Korea makes sense

By David Ignatius, The Washington Post on Aug. 20, 2017, at 12:08 p.m.
The diplomatic trick here is simultaneously reassuring North Korea, China, South Korea and Japan that their vital interests would be protected.
SAM WATERSTON
President Donald Trump answers questions about his responses to the violence, injuries and deaths at the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville as he talks to the media in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York, August 15, 2017.

When ‘getting away with it’ is all Trump cares about

By Sam Waterston, The Washington Post on Aug. 20, 2017, at 10:29 a.m.
When Trump gets away with flouting a rule, even as he pretends to consent to it, when he gets away with a lie, even as he pretends to consent to the commandment not to lie, he readily congratulates himself.
CONTRIBUTORS

What LePage got wrong when he said Collins and King are ‘dangerous’

By Tom Saviello on Aug. 20, 2017, at 9:59 a.m.
The governor’s criticism of Medicaid expansion is unfounded and is not supported by the facts of what has happened in Maine.
MAINELY THOUGHTS

Dear Birth Mom: racial unrest in the news makes me think of you

on Aug. 19, 2017, at 1:24 a.m.
And about all the progress we’ve made as a country.
CONTRIBUTORS

Three reasons fascism spread in 1930s America, and might spread again today

By Seva Gunitsky, The Washington Post on Aug. 18, 2017, at 6:31 a.m.
The last time fascism was brazenly embraced was in the 1930s, and the lessons of that crucial decade bear increasing relevance for modern American life.

Maine’s disastrous new solar rules violate our right to energy independence

By Seth Berry on Aug. 18, 2017, at 6:28 a.m.
CMP and Emera will now monitor your home energy use and actually charge you for the electricity you make and consume onsite.
GEORGE MITCHELL
Former Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell.

The U.S. was formed around ideals, not a race or religion

By George J. Mitchell on Aug. 18, 2017, at 1 a.m.
The angry, violent and supremacist views of the neo-Nazis and white supremacists must be categorically and unequivocally rejected by all Americans.
CONTRIBUTORS
U.S. President Donald Trump and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walk from the Oval Office to the Residence of the White House in Washington, U.S. on February 13, 2017.

We should be deeply worried about NAFTA

By Nelson W. Cunningham, The Washington Post on Aug. 17, 2017, at 2:52 p.m.
He is the most unorthodox and nationalist president of the modern era.
CONTRIBUTORS
Pigeons are feed in Congress Square in Portland. Confederate statues are great places in which to build a foundation of carefully selected twigs, twine and assorted debris, then lay a warm beautiful egg that will someday hatch into a magnificent, glorious bird, the king of the air.

I am in favor of Confederate statues. I am definitely not a pigeon.

By Alexandra Petri, The Washington Post on Aug. 17, 2017, at 11:41 a.m.
This is a normal request from me, a human, perched here with you in solidarity on my two appendages.
CONTRIBUTORS
White supremacists stand behind their shields at a rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12, 2017.

Charlottesville is not the continuation of an old fight. It is something new.

By Danielle Allen, The Washington Post on Aug. 17, 2017, at 7:38 a.m.
What happened in Charlottesville makes everything look too simple. The fight, it would seem, is between neo-Nazis and those who resist them. Yet, the country’s struggle is new.
CONTRIBUTORS
President Donald Trump speaks about the violence, injuries and deaths at the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville as he talks to the media in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York, Aug. 15, 2017.

Trump just hit a new low

By Dana Milbank, The Washington Post on Aug. 17, 2017, at 7:26 a.m.
To equate neo-Nazis with those who oppose them is, even for our alt-right president, a new low.
CONTRIBUTORS
U.S. President Donald Trump answers questions about his response to the violence, injuries and deaths at the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville as he talks to the media in the lobby of Trump Tower in Manhattan, New York, U.S., August 15, 2017.

Charlottesville shakes the Trump presidency

By Ed Rogers, The Washington Post on Aug. 17, 2017, at 6:58 a.m.
To watch Trump’s defenders on Wednesday struggle with trying to defend his bizarre statements is beyond sad; it is pathetic.
CONTRIBUTORS

The Confederate battle flag isn’t a symbol of Southern heritage. It’s a flag of treason.

By Arthur Greif on Aug. 16, 2017, at 7:28 a.m.
The time has come to squarely face the history of the Confederacy.
CONTRIBUTORS

I worked all my life and then had a stroke. I need disability. But I’m so ashamed.

By Robert Fowler, The Washington Post on Aug. 16, 2017, at 7:13 a.m.
After my stroke, when I realized I wouldn’t be able to work, my wife drove me to the Social Security office to apply for benefits. It wasn’t supposed to be like this. It just happened.
CONTRIBUTORS
President Donald Trump smiles as he walks across the South Lawn after arriving via Marine One helicopter at the White House in Washington, U.S. August 14, 2017.

President Trump doesn’t realize his tax plan is actually impossible

By Matt O'Brien, The Washington Post on Aug. 15, 2017, at 11:13 a.m.
Trump is about two months away from discovering how complicated corporate tax cuts can be.