March 23, 2018
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Mental state of accused quadruple murderer remains in question

Josh Reynolds | AP
Josh Reynolds | AP
Orion Krause stands with his attorney Edward Wayland at Krause's arraignment in Ayer District Court in Ayer, Mass., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017.
By Alex Acquisto, BDN Staff

A report determining Orion Krause’s ability to stand trial, which was scheduled to be released Friday, has been delayed.

Krause — the 22-year-old Rockport man who was charged earlier this month in the grisly murders of his mother, grandparents and their home health aid in Groton, Massachusetts — has been at Bridgewater State Hospital for nearly three weeks.

Those at the hospital evaluating Krause’s competency to stand trial have extended the deadline to issue their recommendations from Sept. 29 to Oct. 20, his attorney Edward W. Wayland and the Ayer District Court clerk’s office confirmed on Friday. Details of competency reports are often not made public before they are final recommendations.

The report will be a court recommendation from psychiatrists about whether Krause can competently stand trial for the murders he’s been charged with committing. If he is not deemed competent, Wayland said, Krause will be committed at Bridgewater for treatment period of up to six months, or until he’s deemed mentally competent to stand trial.

Police reports from the Sept. 8 incident that were unsealed last week said Krause allegedly admitted to investigators that he killed the four victims with a baseball bat at the Lackey’s residence on Common Street. The wooden bat was found in the backyard of the residence with blood on it, according to police.

The bodies of Krause’s mother, Elizabeth “Buffy” Krause, 60, and her parents, Elizabeth “Esu” Lackey, 85, and her husband, Frank Danby “Dan” Lackey III, 89, were found sitting up in chairs the kitchen when police arrived, the police reports said.

The body of Bertha Mae Parker, 68, the Lackey’s home health aide, was discovered in a front yard flower bed, police said.

Wayland argued for Ayer District Court Judge Margaret Guzman to keep the records impounded, fearing their release might influence future jurors and only serve to further emotionally harm those close to the deceased, but the court released redacted versions of the police reports over his protests on Sept. 22.

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