November 16, 2018
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Immigration arrests up under Trump administration

Federal immigration arrests are up 37.6 percent under President Donald Trump, at a rate of more 400 a day, including violent offenders and gang members across the United States.

But the sharpest increase is among immigrants who have never been convicted of any crime, and those arrests have more than doubled.

In Trump’s first 100 days in office, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has arrested 41,318 immigrants, over 75 percent of whom have criminal records.

Another 10,845 immigrants with no criminal convictions were also arrested during that time period, compared with 4,242 during the same period last year.

Acting ICE Director Thomas Homan said morale and productivity are up among immigration agents under the Trump administration because they are allowed to do their jobs.

“Will the number of non-criminal arrests and removals increase this year? Absolutely,” Homan said in a conference call with reporters Tuesday. “That’s enforcing the laws on the books.”

Deportations are down about 12 percent during the same period to about 56,315 people this year, which Homan attributed to a significant backlog in the federal immigration courts and the fact that criminals sometimes take longer to deport because they are serving their sentences.

It is unclear how many people this year have been deported.

Former President Barack Obama also faced heated criticism for deporting high numbers of criminals and non-criminals, but unlike Trump, Obama actively lobbied since the start of his administration to pass an immigration bill that would create a path to legal residency for the 11 million illegal immigrants in the United States.

In contrast, Trump issued an executive order days after he took office in January lifting Obama’s orders that they focus largely on criminals and allowing them to arrest anyone in the U.S. illegally, including the parents of U.S. citizens, sparking outcry from immigrant advocates across the United States.

 


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