FAMILY TIES

New granddaughter continues impressive lineage

Posted June 29, 2014, at 6:58 a.m.
Roxanne Moore Saucier
Michael C. York | BDN
Roxanne Moore Saucier

The week before Arabelle Georgette Saucier was born in Minnesota, the thought popped into my head that she would start out holding her head up so she could see what was going on.

And so she did, studying her daddy for all she was worth. As for big brother Aidan, she reclined calmly in his lap, well aware that he had been waiting quite some time to adore her.

Memere and Pepere are enjoying every view of grandchild No. 6 via email and social media, and looking forward to our spot on her social calendar in the coming months.

One frequent question is how our younger son wound up living in Minnesota. The answer is, “He followed his lady love there — and he’d have been a fool not to.”

Arabelle is descended from women who are worth following to Minnesota, so I’m hoping a four-generation photo is in their near future.

Arabelle Georgette Saucier, mom Heather Taylor Saucier, grandmother Julie Powell Mackenzie and great-grandmother Leora Wilcox Barthel comprise of businesswomen, shepherdesses, artists, writers, environmentalists and world-class observers of life.

The four, of course, represent Arabelle’s mitochondrial DNA line, the mother’s mother’s mother and so on. Brother Aidan inherited the mitochondrial DNA and all those wonderful attributes, as well, but not being a girl he cannot pass them on to his own children.

We tend to focus on our male ancestry because we identify with our surname, so let me use the occasion of Arabelle’s birth to encourage genealogists and others to take note of our maternal lines — and to appreciate them.

Even a couple of paragraphs about this ancestral line can be a wonderful gift. And try to take the line back one more generation. Arabelle, I don’t know much about Rose Weedeck Wilcox, but I know people who do. Let us learn together.

In writing about World War II veterans last week, I didn’t get around to reminding readers about the World War II Pages that ran in the Bangor Daily News, 1942-1944.

Having seen the pages for Abbot and Sangerville, I worked on the list of town pages that ran on various dates in the BDN, with a good bit of assistance from Charlie Campo, retired librarian at the paper.

These pages, which include small photos of many of those from the town serving in World War II at the time, can be found on microfilm of the Bangor Daily News at Bangor Public Library, University of Maine Fogler Library in Orono, Maine State Library in Augusta, and University of Maine at Presque Isle Library, among others.

Do share this list with other genealogists who might be interested, and remind them that Family Ties runs on Mondays in the Bangor Daily News.

• Danforth, Dec. 1, 1942.

• Brownville, Dec. 7, 1942

• East Millinocket, Jan. 8, 1943.

• Van Buren, Jan. 26, 1943.

• Fort Kent, Feb. 10, 1943.

• Millinocket, Feb. 23, 1943.

• Mt. Desert, March 9, 1943.

• Lincoln, March 22, 1943.

• Milo, March 26, 1943.

• Wytopitlock, April 1, 1943.

• Limestone, April 13, 1943.

• Winterport, April 20, 1943.

• Medway, April 22, 1943.

• St. Francis, April 27, 1943.

• Madawaska and environs, May 4, 1943.

• Hampden, May 11, 1943.

• Howland-Enfield, May 18, 1943.

• Corinna, May 25, 1943.

• Orono, May 31, 1943.

• Stockholm, June 8, 1943.

• Island Falls, June 15, 1943.

• Stockton Springs, June 17, 1943.

• Winn, Chester, Woodville, June 22, 1943.

• Harrington, June 24, 1943.

• Woodland (Baileyville), June 29, 1943.

• Dennysville, July 6, 1943.

• Guilford, July 13, 1943.

• Greenville, July 20, 1943.

• Dover-Foxcroft, July 27, 1943.

• Orrington, Aug. 3, 1943.

• Frankfort, Aug. 10, 1943.

• Seboeis, Aug. 12, 1943.

• Brownville Junction, Aug. 17, 1943.

• Jonesport, Aug. 24, 1943.

• Patten, Aug. 31, 1943.

• Hodgdon, Sept. 7, 1943.

• Eagle Lake, Sept. 14, 1943.

• Carroll, Sept. 21, 1943.

• Newport, Sept. 28, 1943.

• Corinth, Oct. 5, 1943.

• Stacyville, Oct. 6, 1943.

• Parkman, Oct. 11, 1943.

• Shirley, Oct. 13, 1943.

• Lee, Oct. 14, 1943.

• Springfield, Webster, Lakeville; Nov. 1, 1943 & Nov. 2, 1943.

• Dedham, Nov. 2, 1943.

• Cutler, Nov. 3, 1943.

• Portage, Nov. 8, 1943.

• Greenbush, Nov. 10, 1943.

• Carmel, Nov. 15, 1943.

• Hermon, Nov. 16, 1943.

• Abbot, Nov. 22, 1943.

• Lubec, Nov. 25, 1943.

• Pittsfield, Nov. 25, 1943.

• Pembroke, Dec. 1, 1943.

• Passadumkeag, Dec. 7, 1943.

• Milford, Dec. 20, 1943.

• Prospect, Dec. 27, 1943.

• Etna, Dec. 30, 1943.

• Sangerville, Jan. 3, 1944.

• Glenburn, Jan. 4, 1944

• St. John, Jan. 5, 1944.

• Gouldsboro, Jan. 13, 1944.

• Hudson, Jan. 18, 1944.

• Brooklin, Jan. 25, 1944.

• University of Maine, Feb. 4, 1944.

• Harmony, Feb. 8, 1944.

• Daigle, Feb. 23, 1944.

• Ashland, March 1, 1944.

• Veazie, April 13, 1944.

• Sedgwick, May 1, 1944.

• Burlington, May 5, 1944.

• Plymouth, May 17, 1944.

• Monson, May 26, 1944.

• Former B&A Railroad employees, May 30, 1944.

• Topsfield, June 6, 1944.

• Cherryfield, June 19, 1944.

• Bridgewater, June 26, 1944.

• Dixmont, July 5, 1944.

I missed the flash mob that came together on Bangor’s waterfront to dance its love for former Bangor Police Chief Don Winslow and wife Dora. The world agrees that I write better than I dance, so here’s an excerpt from the Aug. 11, 1998, edition of the Bangor Daily News:

“The gavel came down, and Wanda Winslow beamed. Then she and husband Don added to the applause after council affirmation Monday evening of the city’s new head of the police department, Chief Don Winslow, their son. All of the city councilors present offered their congratulations to the new police chief.

‘An external search really was not needed,’ commented Councilor Gerry Palmer Jr., who sat in on the committee that interviewed the three city employees, including the two finalists from the department. ‘We are very much blessed with the quality and caliber of city staff,’ added Councilor James Tyler. Waiting for the council to take up the appointment, Winslow, one of five children, had not only the support of his parents in attendance, but his wife, Dora, and daughters Melissa and Meredith.

His sister, Carol, was there, as was ‘best friend since kindergarten’ Bruce Buchanan, Detective Sgt. Ron Gastia, their spouses, Carol’s children, numerous other friends, and former Old Town Fire Chief Ken Sirois, Winslow’s boss before he came to the Bangor Police Department 19 years ago.”

Donny and I always enjoy chatting about his Mayflower ancestry, and he’s a good sport when I bring it up during programs I’ve given for the Kiwanis Club, for example.

Donny and Dora Winslow are a class act as individuals, and as a couple. They are a blessing to everyone who knows them, so I’m hoping that the love and faith of their countless Bangor area friends bless them during life’s challenges.

Signed, Roxanne Saucier, the Writing Flash Mob on June 27, 2014.

For information on researching family history in Maine, see Genealogy Resources under Family Ties at bangordailynews.com/browse/family-ties. Send genealogy queries to Family Ties, Bangor Daily News, P.O. Box 1329, Bangor 04402, or email familyti@bangordailynews.com.

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