May 20, 2018
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Thomaston auction to feature Brooke Astor items, Native American art, Maine paintings, more

Thomaston Place Auction Galleries will present an array of fine art and historical treasures at its Spring Feature Auction on May 31 and June 1, featuring important Native American beaded buckskin artifacts, many paintings and sculptures, a collection of items from Brooke Astor’s Maine cottage, plus estate jewelry, early silver, rare documents, clocks and antique furniture.

“This sale will include many rare and historically significant pieces that could be great additions to private and museum collections. We will also be presenting a great selection of fine decorative items, plus a boat — just in time for summer,” said owner and auctioneer Kaja Veilleux.

Featured among the museum-quality examples of Native American craftsmanship will be an 1850-1880 Northern Plains Indian Hidatsa buckskin shirt from the Dakotas with quill and seed bead decoration, fringe and buffalo hair tassels. A pair of circa 1880 Northern Plains Indians Lakota Sioux buckskin leggings and two circa 1880 Lakota Sioux beaded buckskin pouches will also be presented. The sale will offer other examples of Native American craftsmanship, such as carved items, pottery, basketry, jewelry and textiles, and five lots of Native American photography.

Leading the fine art category will be paintings by Jack Lorimer Gray (NY/CAN, 1927-1981), western painter James Taylor Harwood (UT/CA, 1860-1940) titled “Where the Blackbirds Nest,” and an oil on canvas tonalist work by Bruce Crane (CT/NY, 1857-1937) of Main Street, Old Lyme, Connecticut.

Maine artwork includes two oil on canvas paintings by Stephen Etnier; a work by Marguerite Zorach entitled “Grande Valle”; a portrait of a young girl by E.E. Finch; an oil on Masonite painting depicting Black Head, Monhegan, by Andrew George Winter; a painting depicting the Portland Headlight by Clement Drew; and an unsigned portrait of Rufus King Sewell.

The furniture selection will include a Hepplewhite Period huntboard form butler’s desk, a Port Clyde, Maine, 19th century pine workbench with original gray paint and breadboard ends, a Russian painted three-drawer chest dated 1851, plus several early Maine-made painted stands.

Three highlights will be a pair of 14K yellow gold candlesticks with gilt silver reticulated candle-shades by Gorham; a platinum, 3-stone diamond ring by Tiffany & Co.; and an 18th century Boston coin silver porringer by David Colson Moseley, apprentice and brother-in-law to Paul Revere.

There will be 39 lots of items from the Maine cottage of the late philanthropist and socialite Brooke Astor, such as several autograph collections (including those of British royalty, politicians and celebrities), rare books and maps, and fine paintings and sculptures.

Also, of particular local interest will be a 19th century Maine tall clock with wooden works, pumpkin pine Chippendale case, and painted dial marked “S. Edwards, Gorham,” a group of seven bird carvings by Maine carvers, a weathervane made by Ernest Thorne Thompson (1897-1992) of New Brunswick and Damariscotta, plus a variety of early Maine samplers and hooked rugs.

Finally, the auction will offer a 2006 15-foot-long Boston Whaler 150 Sport speedboat with Karavan trailer and a 2004 Mini Cooper S Hatchback automobile.

The auction will begin at 11 a.m. both days. A complete, full-color catalog, with detailed descriptions and photographs, is available, and all lots can be viewed at Thomaston Place Auction Galleries’ website, www.thomastonauction.com.

In addition to live bidding, Thomaston Place accepts bids via absentee, phone and on the Internet, via invaluable.com, auctionzip.com and liveauctioneers.com. The buyer’s premium is 15 percent. Call 354-8141 for more information, or to reserve seats in the auction hall.

The gallery will be open for previews from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, May 26-Friday, May 30, and from 9 to 11 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday, May 31 and June 1.

 


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