Yesterday

The Old Town Indians are a young, but hustling ball club this season and should give the opposition a lot of trouble in the remaining weeks. The Indians' infield will consist of (from left) Russ Godin at first, Dick Martin at second, Artie Miles at shortstop, and Gene Guerin at third. The players posed for the photographer on Monday, May 11, 1953.
BDN file photo by Danny Maher
The Old Town Indians are a young, but hustling ball club this season and should give the opposition a lot of trouble in the remaining weeks. The Indians' infield will consist of (from left) Russ Godin at first, Dick Martin at second, Artie Miles at shortstop, and Gene Guerin at third. The players posed for the photographer on Monday, May 11, 1953.
Posted April 15, 2014, at 10:43 a.m.

YESTERDAY …

10 years ago — April 17, 2004

(As reported in the Bangor Daily News)

BANGOR — Bill and Shirley Jordan of Oakland waited at Bangor International Airport on Thursday afternoon for a flight that would take them to Orlando, Fla., and a 10-day break from Maine’s dreary spring weather. The couple admitted they could have flown from Portland, Manchester, N.H., or even Boston but chose Bangor because they didn’t want to deal with the hassle of a busier airport.

The Jordans are a good example of why passenger traffic at BIA is up 23 percent in the first quarter of 2004, compared to the same three months of 2003. By comparison, nationwide traffic rose only 2.3 percent over the same time, according to Federal Aviation Administration statistics, and Portland International Jetport saw an increase of just 3.6 percent in its first quarter of 2004.

ORONO — Competing globally in the manufacturing sector is responsible business, but the United States is losing its advantage by regulatory and tax policies that are adding costs to production, according to the chief executive officer of MeadWestvaco Corp.

It’s a double-edged sword for worldwide companies such as MeadWestvaco, which last year garnered 30 percent of its $7.5 billion in sales revenue from outside the United States.

“We like that,” said John A. Luke Jr., chairman and chief executive officer, about the non-U.S.-generated income during a speech at the Maine Pulp and Paper Foundation’s open house Thursday night.

American businesses need the international marketplace to generate sales and increase their companies’ value to shareholders. However, shifting production overseas, or purchasing products such as pulp and paper from low-cost manufacturers in Southeast Asia or Europe, may threaten the country’s standard of living and eventually could become a national defense issue.

 

25 years ago — April 17, 1989

BREWER — The Photo Source of Brewer is sponsoring the third annual Photo Contest in recognition of the Brewer Day Celebration.

The contest is open to photographers of all ages. Categories are: open, people, nature, and open black and white. More than $800 in prizes will be awarded, including cameras, photo accessories, gift certificates from area merchants and a color portrait session from Morelli Studio.

OLD TOWN — Although the school board will have about a month to pare the figure somewhat, board members recently began work on a $7.4 million school budget for 1989-90 that includes a 15-percent increase over last year’s request, Superintendent John J. Grady said recently.

Although Grady said the board’s goal is to whittle the increase down to about 12 percent before the budget is committed to the City Council next month, about half of the increase is the result of what he termed “one-year impact” costs.

The one-year costs, he said, include $130,000 budgeted for the first payment of the high school addition, the cost of moving the ninth grade to the high school and opening new positions there, leasing two double-wide portables for the high school, and negotiating new contracts with teachers and administrators.

 

50 years ago — April 17, 1964

BANGOR — The League of Women Voters met Wednesday morning at the home of Mrs. Lawrence Cutler. Harold Thurlow, executive director of the Urban Renewal Department and Lowell Sherwood, assistant director, spoke to the group on the progress being made on the Stillwater Park Urban Renewal Project.

To date the Urban Renewal Authority has been acquiring the land in the project area and 50 of the 68 families have been relocated. The first demolition in the Stillwater Park area of 28 buildings has been completed, and 26 more buildings are being demolished at this time.

Mr. Thurlow reported that work is progressing on the construction of streets, sidewalks, water and sewers in the Park.

ORONO — Thirty-five Maine high schools will send 160 students to the University of Maine Saturday to participate in the annual Maine Speech Festival.

Students will enter Original Speaking and Oral Interpretation divisions of the 61-year-old festival, which is conducted annually to encourage the use of better speech and to stimulate interest in speech training.

There are no winners in the festival, although certificates and appropriate medals to speakers with superior ratings are awarded.

 

100 years ago — April 17, 1914

BANGOR — Bangor’s army of unemployed, once composed of more than 200, has fast dwindled away until there remain but 50 quartered at the Salvation Army Barracks under the care of Ensign Armstrong.

Thursday the remnants of this once strong array were inspected by an agent of the Great Northern Paper Company. Ten men were hired outright and 25 more were promised work very soon. The other 15 were such men as the agents of the companies could not use.

Ten of the men will go to work this morning for the Great Northern and the 25 will be kept until the company can use them, which 15 of the men who were non-usable will be sent forth of shift for themselves, as the Salvation Army cannot keep them any longer.

In the future those who are deemed good men for work, but who cannot be used, will be given a paper signed by an agent to that effect, showing that jobs will be given them as speedily as possible and this certificate of usefulness will be necessary to obtain lodging at the Barracks.

BANGOR — Notwithstanding that the genial chief of the weather bureau got gloriously mixed, and dumped a lot of January weather into the middle of April, last night’s entertainment for the Good Samaritan Home was a decided success. A very comfortable sum will be realized — exactly how much has not been figured out — and there was no flaw in the elaborate arrangements.

 

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