Weekly Yesterday for March 27-April 2, 2014

Forty Senior Girl Scouts had supper at the YWCA followed by a skating party at the New Auditoruim Saturday night, Jan. 14, 1956. Prominent in arranging the event were, left to right, front row, Sylvia Haliotis, Jane Goode, Sandra Peavey, Nancy Todtman, Lynne Footman, and Mary Jane Wiswell; back row, Maureen Perry, Meredith Winterbottom and Bettye Ware.
Danny Maher
Forty Senior Girl Scouts had supper at the YWCA followed by a skating party at the New Auditoruim Saturday night, Jan. 14, 1956. Prominent in arranging the event were, left to right, front row, Sylvia Haliotis, Jane Goode, Sandra Peavey, Nancy Todtman, Lynne Footman, and Mary Jane Wiswell; back row, Maureen Perry, Meredith Winterbottom and Bettye Ware.
Posted March 24, 2014, at 3:56 p.m.

YESTERDAY …

10 years ago — March 27, 2004

(As reported in the Bangor Daily News)

HOLDEN — The town of Holden is one of 160 Maine Review Committee communities that use the Penobscot Energy Recovery Co. in Orrington to dispose of their trash.

For this reason, the Holden Town Council — and community leaders from across the state — have been asked to sign a resolve supporting the West Old Town landfill as a site the state can use for future waste disposal. But at a special town meeting Friday, councilors did not affix Holden’s stamp of approval to the resolve.

Councilor Michael Lagasse started the meeting on a doubtful note: “I’m not sure that we know enough about this to take this position.”

BANGOR — The future of University College of Bangor is one aspect of the University of Maine System’s proposed reorganization plan that has yet to be determined.

University College is currently under the management structure of the University of Maine at Augusta. Under the reorganization proposal, the administration of UMA will be handled by the University of Southern Maine in Portland.

The reorganization plan calls for the shifting of all two-year programs to the Maine Community College System and the merging of some baccalaureate programs to other campuses.

25 years ago — March 27, 1989

BANGOR — After meeting with members of the Penobscot County legislative delegation who relayed constituent complaints about the recently approved pay plan for county employees, county commissioners said they will stand by the new pay schedule and look ahead to official negotiations in the fall.

District 113 Rep. Jack Richards told the commissioners that the delegation, in response to more than 50 constituent complaints, held a meeting to discuss the matter and the dissatisfaction of county employees with the pay scale.

“They’re not overly happy with the amount of money they’re making,” Richards said.

BREWER — The Brewer City Council will be asked Tuesday night to require all department heads hired in the future to be residents of the city, according to Councilor Larry Doughty, who filed the proposed order.

Doughty had mentioned several times in recent years that various department heads did not live in the city and did not own property within the city limits. Anyone working for the city and collecting large salaries, Doughty sad, should be required to reside in Brewer and to live under the rules set by themselves and other department heads.

“I’m not sure it’s a good idea,” Councilor Gerald Robertson said of Doughty’s proposal.

50 years ago — March 27, 1964

BANGOR — Bangor Urban Renewal Authorities said Thursday operations had begun this week to move nearly 200 vehicles, the used and junk car stock of the Baker Auto Sales Company on Birch Street, out of the Stillwater Park Redevelopment project area.

The vehicles will be moved to the Cody’s Auto Parts lot in East Corinth, it was stated. Also, Bainbridge “Benny” Baker, proprietor of the Bangor business, reportedly will open a used car lot here.

It is the second commercial firm to be affected by the Stillwater Park project location program. The first, the Goss Woodworking Shop conducted on a part-time basis, sold its machinery some time ago, it was reported. There were four commercial firms listed in the park area.

BANGOR — Another section of what was once the elite part of Bangor, the original homestead of John Cassidy, who made a fortune in timberlands, was sold to Donald Bean for a reported price of $80,000, Thursday.

The original Cassidy estate, including four adjoining homes, built for Cassidy children, was once the center of the best residential section of the city. It is bounded by Main, Summer, and Railroad Streets.

100 years ago — March 27, 1914

BANGOR — Handsome young women wearing gowns of the latest Paris design, New York’s newest coats and the most charming of spring waists paraded around the aisles and showrooms of The Fashion Thursday night, while throngs and swarms of women gazed, studiously and admiringly, and other throngs, finding it impossible to get into the store, crowded the sidewalks in front or lined the opposite curb, gazing wistfully up at the brilliantly lighted style parlors and wishing they had come earlier.

Good-looking girls in stylish gowns are attractive enough, to be sure, but when they parade in pink, blue and green wigs the show takes on a novel aspect sufficient to create a sensation anywhere.

And will anyone wear the pink, green and blue wigs? H-m! Well, you never can tell. They will look well with evening attire.

BREWER — From present conditions, it is doubtful if there will be any salmon fishing at the [Brewer Salmon] pool on the opening day of the season, next Wednesday, or by the down-river weirmen. The ice is thick and heavy and unless there is some very mild weather, with wind and rain, very soon, the salmon season on the Penobscot will be several weeks late this year.

Compiled by Brian Swartz

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