Judge gives Inn at Brunswick Station more time to change its name

The Inn at Brunswick Station, which went into business in 2011, has been ordered to change its name after being sued by a nearby establishment called The Brunswick Inn over its use of a similar name.
Christopher Cousins
The Inn at Brunswick Station, which went into business in 2011, has been ordered to change its name after being sued by a nearby establishment called The Brunswick Inn over its use of a similar name.
Posted March 19, 2014, at 10:19 a.m.
The Brunswick Inn, which has used that name since 2009, sued the Inn at Brunswick Station, over its use of a similar name.
Christopher Cousins
The Brunswick Inn, which has used that name since 2009, sued the Inn at Brunswick Station, over its use of a similar name.

BRUNSWICK, Maine — A federal judge has given the owners of The Inn at Brunswick Station an additional 30 days to change the establishment’s name and comply with a court ruling that the business infringed on the name of The Brunswick Inn.

JHR Development now has until May 5 to stop using the name “The Inn at Brunswick Station” or any similar name that uses both the word “Brunswick” and word “Inn,” according to court documents.

In December 2013, a jury awarded The Brunswick Inn owner Eileen Horner $10,000 after determining that The Inn at Brunswick Station’s name infringed on The Brunswick Inn’s trademark.

Horner sued The Inn at Brunswick Station in 2012, claiming that since the latter had opened in June 2011, guests have confused the two and cost her reservations and money. Horner had used the name The Brunswick Inn since 2009 and had trademarked it. The similar names have even confused the local fire department, which once responded to a cooking fire at the wrong inn, according to court documents.

U.S. District Court Judge Nancy Torresen ruled in February that JHR Development must change the name of The Inn at Brunswick Station. She said the inn could continue to maintain its website, innatbrunswickstation.com, for another year, “but only in a manner that automatically redirects users who enter that domain name into their web browsers to a new noninfringing website with a different noninfringing domain name.”

In a March 10 filing, JHR Development said the company has “been working diligently to select and implement a new name for their establishment,” but given the number of tasks and coordination with vendors, they would not be able to properly inform the public of a new name by the original date, April 4, and that would damage their business.

Torresen granted the motion for extension on March 11. Horner did not oppose the motion.

Mike Lyne of JHR Development did not immediately return a phone call Wednesday.

 

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