FAMILY TIES

Luge medalist may have connection to Hannibal Hamlin from Maine

Posted Feb. 16, 2014, at 9:57 a.m.
 Erin Hamlin (USA) waves to the crowd after receiving her bronze medal during the medal ceremony for the women's singles luge during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games at the Medals Plaza.
James Lang | USA Today Sports
Erin Hamlin (USA) waves to the crowd after receiving her bronze medal during the medal ceremony for the women's singles luge during the Sochi 2014 Olympic Winter Games at the Medals Plaza.

Three cheers for Erin Hamlin, the first American woman to ever win an Olympic medal in the luge event. For sure, I will be sending her a message to ask what her dad knows about his Hamlin line. As in, does he need any help in figuring out his relationship to former Vice President Hannibal Hamlin from Maine?

Erin’s parents, Ronald and Eileen Hamlin, consider Remsen, N.Y., their hometown. When I learn more about Erin’s ancestry, I will let you know.

As I told the Brewer Historical Society on Feb. 11, the day Erin won her bronze medal, I know that my claim to being a second cousin, five times removed, from Hannibal Hamlin is due to the fact that Hannibal and I both have Bonney ancestors.

Hannibal is buried in lot 3 Riverside CG of Bangor’s Mount Hope Cemetery, not far from State Street.

It is also my Bonney line which makes me a distant cousin of artist Waldo Peirce, who also is buried at Mount Hope.

As I write this, the snow is a bit deep for a pastoral walk among the more than 28,800 burial places in Mount Hope, the country’s second “garden cemetery.”

But it’s a fine time for looking up the location of any relatives or interesting people buried there.

Go to mthopebrg.com and enter a name or even just a surname to bring up a listing of burials there. The updated mapping function will help you pinpoint where you will want to look when spring comes.

Keep in mind that those buried in the “city” portion of the cemetery, including notables such as gangster Al Brady, are not included in the specific mapping, and you may need to contact Public Works for information about where a particular plot is.

“Showcase Your Ancestors,” a program hosted by the Penobscot County Genealogical Society is open to the public. Members and others are invited to bring in a family photograph or other memento and discuss your family tree at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 19, in the lecture hall on the third floor at Bangor Public Library, 145 Harlow St.

My suggestion is to use no more than five minutes for your remarks, so everyone who wants to participate can do so. For information, call Elizabeth Stevens at 947-8336, ext. 103, or email esteve@bpl.lib.me.us.

I think that rather than bring a photo, I may take along a patchwork quilt from my Moore-Leighton line that is more than 100 years old.

The third floor of the library is accessible by elevator if you use the door on the righthand side of the building.

Upcoming programs scheduled for Bangor Public Library include “World Acadian Congress 2014” with Dona Saucier at 3 p.m. Saturday, March 8; and “Hidden Bangor” with Wayne Reilly at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 19.

For information on researching family history in Maine, see Genealogy Resources under Family Ties at bangordailynews.com/browse/family-ties. Send genealogy queries to Family Ties, Bangor Daily News, P.O. Box 1329, Bangor 04402, or email familyti@bangordailynews.com.

 

SEE COMMENTS →

ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business
ADVERTISEMENT | Grow your business

Similar Articles

More in Living