BDN Travel Bug makes it to New Hampshire

The BDN Travel Bug entered the geocaching world on Aug. 30, 2013. Travel bugs are trackable metal tags that can be attached to objects so they can be tracked on geocaching.com as they move from geocache to geocache.
Aislinn Sarnacki
The BDN Travel Bug entered the geocaching world on Aug. 30, 2013. Travel bugs are trackable metal tags that can be attached to objects so they can be tracked on geocaching.com as they move from geocache to geocache. Buy Photo
Posted Nov. 20, 2013, at 12:04 p.m.

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Travel bugs are trackable metal tags that can be attached to objects so they can be tracked on geocaching.com as they move from geocache to geocache.
Aislinn Sarnacki
Travel bugs are trackable metal tags that can be attached to objects so they can be tracked on geocaching.com as they move from geocache to geocache. Buy Photo

The BDN Travel Bug began its journey in the Bangor City Forest on Aug. 30, when it was placed in the traditional geocache Crazy Camo.

For those who don’t know about geocaching, it’s a recreational activity of hunting for and finding hidden objects by means of GPS coordinates. A travel bug is just one of the many elements of geocaching. It’s a trackable metal tag that can be attached to an item that moves from cache to cache.

A travel bug has one job: to travel. And it often has a secondary mission, requiring the geocachers who find it to perform some sort of task before dropping it in the next cache.

For example, the BDN Travel Bug started out attached to a small white seashell, strung on a metal chain. And on geocaching.com, it has a goal: “First, please remember to keep this bug moving to the next cache! But while you have it, feel free to add a local seashell onto the chain (it will have to have a hole of some sort). Or, you can take a photograph of something small but beautiful in the local environment, like a seashell, and post it on the BDN Travel Bug page. Sometimes it’s the small things in nature that are most beautiful! It would be great to collect a seashell from the west coast of the US!”

So far, the BDN Travel Bug hasn’t made it too far. Nevertheless, its adventure has been exciting. On geocaching.com, I can follow where it goes and which geocacher is currently in possession of the bug:

Geniecache found the BDN Travel Bug in “Crazycamo” on Sept. 10 and took a bunch of different geocaches, then placed it in “Fishing Point” on Sept. 30, 9.4 miles north of where it started.

Maine to Massachusetts retrieved it from “Fishing Point” on Oct. 4 and took it to the Granite State Geocachers Community Cookout 2013 in New Hampshire on Oct. 11, 155.6 miles southwest from where it started.

Snowsunflowers took it from the cookout and brought it to a number of caches before toting it to another geocaching event, the Mountainside Meet and Greet III, in New Hampshire on Oct. 16, 127.1 miles southwest from where it started.

Maniac1957 retrieved it from the event and then placed it in “Cooper Spring” on Oct. 27, 90.7 miles southwest from where it started. And that’s where it remains, according to the travel bug’s online logbook.

So if you happen to come across the BDN Travel Bug, add a shell (or share a nature photo online) and keep it moving.

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