OTHER VOICES

The U.S. is complicit in Egypt’s violence

Smoke is seen over Ramses Square after Islamist protests descended into a bloodbath across Egypt with around 50 killed alone on a &quotDay of Rage" called by followers of ousted President Mohamed Morsi to denounce a crackdown by the army-backed government after clashes in Cairo, August 16, 2013.
STEVE CRISP | REUTERS
Smoke is seen over Ramses Square after Islamist protests descended into a bloodbath across Egypt with around 50 killed alone on a "Day of Rage" called by followers of ousted President Mohamed Morsi to denounce a crackdown by the army-backed government after clashes in Cairo, August 16, 2013.
Posted Aug. 16, 2013, at 4:21 p.m.

Before the July 3 coup in Egypt, the Obama administration privately warned the armed forces against ousting the government of Mohammed Morsi, pointing to U.S. legislation that requires the cutoff of aid to any country where the army plays a “decisive role” in removing an elected government. Yet when the generals ignored the U.S. warnings, the White House responded by electing to disregard the law itself. After a prolonged and embarrassing delay, the State Department announced that it had chosen not to determine whether a coup had taken place, and Secretary of State John F. Kerry declared that Egypt’s military was “restoring democracy.”

Because of those decisions, the Obama administration is complicit in the new and horrifyingly bloody crackdown launched Wednesday by the de facto regime against tens of thousands of protesters who had camped out in two Cairo squares. At least 278 people were reported killed, including many women and children.

The Obama administration duly protested the latest crackdown, just as it previously urged the military not to use force against the demonstrations and to release Morsi and other political prisoners. The military’s disregard for these appeals was logical and predictable: Washington had already demonstrated that its warnings were not credible. Indeed, even as police were still gunning down unarmed civilians in the streets of Cairo Wednesday, a White House spokesman was reiterating to reporters the administration’s determination not to make a judgement about whether the terms of the anti-coup legislation had been met.

This refusal to take a firm stand against massive violations of human rights is as self-defeating for the United States as it is unconscionable.

The Washington Post (Aug. 15)

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