Seeing life at low level


Two northern wasp moths (Virginia ctenucha) draw nectar from thistles blooming in the Bangor City Forest.
BDN Brian Swartz
Two northern wasp moths (Virginia ctenucha) draw nectar from thistles blooming in the Bangor City Forest.
Posted Aug. 14, 2013, at 8:43 a.m.
Rain-laden clouds sweep toward the Orono Bog and its boardwalk on a warm, moist summer afternoon.
BDN Brian Swartz
Rain-laden clouds sweep toward the Orono Bog and its boardwalk on a warm, moist summer afternoon.
Pausing briefly during its frenetic flight across Orono Bog, four-winged dragonfly alights on a tamarack limb.
BDN Brian Swartz
Pausing briefly during its frenetic flight across Orono Bog, four-winged dragonfly alights on a tamarack limb.

Photos and text by Brian Swartz

Weekly Staff Editor

 

Adults can easily miss the small stuff at Bangor City Forest and Orono Bog. Whether biking, jogging, or walking on the forest’s roads or trails (no biking or running on the Orono Bog Walk, please), we notice the scenery at (or close to) eye level, not that beneath our feet.

Recently my 7-year-old grandson accompanied me to the forest and bog. He’s approximately 60 to 65 percent of my height, and his elevation places him nearer to what I don’t notice.

That advantage became evident as we cruised through the forest and across the bog.

Instructed by me to “call out anything pretty that you see,” the grandson expanded that definition to include bugs, raindrop splatters, spider webs and other “small stuff” that I overlooked. With my camera I photographed his definition of things “pretty,” plus a few traditional images I would take if hiking alone.

On your next trip to the Bangor City Forest or Orono Bog, check out what’s happening around shoelace height. Based on what my grandson noticed, it’s a fascinating world down there.

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